lundi janv. 10, 2011

Screencast - installing a GlassFish company-internal repository

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The GlassFish Update Center is a really severely underused feature of the product (IMO). Of course you can install GlassFish and simply ignore the update center and not use it to install updates, 3rd party frameworks, your own packages or upcoming patches but that would be ignoring one of the unique features of the product.

This new screencast shows how to setup a GlassFish Update Center repository behind your company's firewall. It shows access to support.oracle.com (which replaced sunsolve) to grab the content of the repository, setting up an internal server (a Publisher), and updating existing GlassFish installs to use it or installing new app servers from this repo.

The offline version is here (75 MB).

The screencast scenario is largely based on this "Extending and Updating GlassFish Server Inside a Closed Network" documentation (for GlassFish 3.0.1) and you may also find "Upgrading to Oracle GlassFish Server From GlassFish Server Open Source Edition" to be useful. Finally, the blog about support from Oracle mentioned at the end of the screencast is here.

jeudi févr. 25, 2010

GlassFish à la manoeuvre chez PSA Peugeot Citroen

Le choix de GlassFish par PSA Peugeot Citroën n'est pas nouveau mais je suis tout de même très content de voir aujourd'hui la société communiquer sur son utilisation du produit en production. Les échanges avec Sun sont nombreux depuis près d'un an et concernent pour l'instant GlassFish v2.x.

jeudi oct. 09, 2008

More Production GlassFish

vendredi août 22, 2008

I'm moving from the (NetBeans) GlassFish development server to a production server and my application won't run! Help!

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I've recently seen a flurry of people moving to production GlassFish servers coming from a NetBeans development environment so I thought I'd write down in this post what I've been replying on the various mailing lists and forums.

NetBeans auto-magically creates all the resources required in the GlassFish runtime (JNDI resources, connexion pools, and other configuration), so directly deploying an application (.war, .ear artifacts) in a newly-installed GlassFish instance will most likely fail because the resources the application replies on are not present. To fix this you have several options:

1/ add the remote production GlassFish server to the list of NetBeans servers. The trick is that you first need to point NetBeans to a local install and later describe the remote server with IP and Port number.

2/ use the GLASSFISH_HOME/bin/asupgrade tool to inject all the applications/resources/configuration from a source to the production target. Note this tool can work across multiple version of GlassFish and migrates things like security stores, virtual servers, etc... If using strictly the same bits (same version of GlassFish) in development and production, you could also probably use GLASSFISH_HOME/bin/asadmin backup-domain and the GLASSFISH_HOME/bin/asadmin restore-domain commands.

3/ re-create all the resources using either the CLI (asadmin) or the GUI (http://localhost:4848). For Make sure you can ping the database when creating connection pools.



% bin/asadmin create-jdbc
Closest matching command(s): 
    create-jdbc-connection-pool
    create-jdbc-resource

All of this (deployed applications, JNDI resources, virtual hosts, and configuration) is stored in GLASSFISH_HOME/domains/domain1/conf/domain.xml. You shouldn't edit this by hand but it may be useful for troubleshooting and diff'ing the development and production environments..

Update : Peter Williams suggests a fourth way using sun-resources.xml .

dimanche mars 09, 2008

Wotif.com, a good GlassFish experience (available as audio podcast)

Greg Luck, Wotif.com's Chief Architect has a GlassFish case-study available as the latest GlassFish Podcast episode.

A gentleman at the end asks a question about whether this was truly a successful GlassFish experience for Wotif.com given the issues faced before going into production. Having been in sales for the past 7 years and still pretty involved, I think that this certainly qualifies as a good experience but you probably need to listen to the podcast and to Greg's answer to this question.

If you haven't heard of Wotif.com, they're the largest hotel booking site in Australia, and growing.

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