jeudi sept. 18, 2008

Building GlassFish v2 from source

Why build from source? First, because as with any open source projects, if there's a bug \*you\* can fix it. Second because you can get money for that. Finally, because even with GlassFish v3 Prelude around the corner, GlassFish v2 is still going to be in production for a long period at many customer sites.

v3 is very easy to build using the latest and greatest svn and mvn while building GlassFish v2 from source still requires CVS, maven 1.0.2 (1.1 doesn't work) and Java 5 (no Java 6). All this is detailed on this wiki page. The following is a stripped down version of the process for GlassFish v2ur2 (tagged SJSAS91_UR2_BRANCH).
Update: the tag for v2.1, released in January 2009 is SJSAS-9_1_1-B60E-23_Dec_2008.
Update: the tag for v2.1.1, released in october 2009 is SJSAS-2_1_1-B31G-19_Oct_2009.

First, make sure you have Java 5 as de default version by setting JAVA_HOME appropriately. Also set MAVEN_HOME to use 1.0.2 and MAVEN_OPTS to "-Xmx1024m". Finally, have $HOME/build.properties configured (or pass those as -D maven options):
glassfish.os.name=<OS Name: Possible values : WINNT | SunOS | Linux | SunOS_X86 | Darwin>
glassfish.cvs.username=<java.net_id>

The first step is the CVS checkout of the bootstrap (first magic string is the branch tag):
% cvs -d :pserver:username-AT-cvs.dev.java-DOT-net:/cvs login
% cvs co -r SJSAS91_UR2_BRANCH glassfish/bootstrap
% cd glassfish/bootstrap

This should complete in a matter of seconds.

The second step combines the full checkout and build process (second magic string is the correct set of maven goals)
% maven bootstrap checkout build build-jarinstaller

Checking out the entire source tree takes 15 minutes (modulo your bandwidth of course). The rest of the process takes another 15 minutes on my fairly recent laptop (and compiles around 10k classes in the process). The resulting installer jar can then be found in the ./publish directory:
% ls ./publish/\*.jar
glassfish-installer.jar

The -Dmodules= flag helps you checkout or build a specific set of modules. This and a lot more is documented on the wiki. Julien discussed building v3 a few weeks back. Whatever the version, remember we like bug reports and patches even more! :)

jeudi juil. 31, 2008

Why should I buy a subscription when community support is good enough?

Sun's fiscal year recently came to an end and I can tell you that GlassFish subscriptions are doing well. I can't really say more other than it includes many new customers. Winning new customers is hard, so we're pretty happy. I've previously commented on the value of support but in the meantime, I've heard other concerns which I'd like to adress here.

There is no one good true model for open source monetization and I don't pretend ours is perfect, but here's what you get when you buy a GlassFish subscription. Feedback welcome.

Hotline for Bug fixing
Of course you could say that community support (email, forum, blogs) is really good and maybe good enough. Fair enough. When you file issues (remember, we love bug reports, we're even about to give away $50,000 to bug submitters), it is considered as community support and thus best effort on Sun's side. As a side note, we probably have progress to make in bug triage but that's a different topic. The only reliable way to escalate an issue and have it fixed is the GlassFish subscription. This is what will get your bug fixed and delivered to you under an SLA.

Access to patches
sunsolve.sun.com is where patches (incremental add-ons to a production system vs. reinstall of an unknown quality build from glassfish.org's trunk) are made available to customers with GlassFish subscriptions. Eduardo is maintaining a high-quality blog about everything released via that mechanism at blogs.sun.com/GlassFishForBusiness. Take a look and see what you're missing out on. GlassFish v2ur2 Patch 2 should be out day now.

Indemnification
It seems that the value of indemnification heavily depends on the part of the world you're from, ranging from "absolute must-have" to "indemnifi-what?". In a nutshell, Sun takes extreme care in managing is source code which includes things like the Sun Contributor Agreement (SCA) which enable us to provide the protect you from patent claims people expect.

Questions? Suggestions? Fire!

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