Tuesday May 26, 2009

Mirroring flash SSDs

As flash memory has become more and more prevalent in storage from the consumer to theenterprise people have been charmed by the performance characteristics, but get stuck on the longevity. SSDs based on SLC flash are typically rated at 100,000 to 1,000,000 write/erase cycles while MLC-based SSDs are rated for significantly less. For conventional hard drives, the distinct yet similar increase in failures over time has long been solved by mirroring (or other redundancy techniques). When applying this same solution to SSDs, a common concern is that two identical SSDs with identical firmware storing identical data would run out of write/erase cycles for a given cell at the same moment and thus data reliability would not be increased via mirroring. While the logic might seem reasonable, permit me to dispel that specious argument.

The operating system and filesystem

From the level of most operating systems or filesystems, an SSD appears like a conventional hard drive and is treated more or less identically (Solaris' ZFS being a notable exception). As with hard drives, SSDs can report predicted failures though SMART. For reasons described below, SSDs already keep track of the wear of cells, but one could imagine even the most trivial SSD firmware keeping track of the rapidly approaching write/erase cycle limit and notifying the OS or FS via SMART which would in turn the user. Well in advance of actual data loss, the user would have an opportunity to replace either or both sides of the mirror as needed.

SSD firmware

Proceeding down the stack to the level of the SSD firmware, there are two relevant features to understand: wear-leveling, and excess capacity. There is not a static mapping between the virtual offset of an I/O to an SSD and the physical flash cells that are chosen by the firmware to record the data. For a variety of reasons — flash call early mortality, write performance, bad cell remapping — it is necessary for the SSD firmware to remap data all over its physical flash cells. In fact, hard drives have a similar mechanism by which they hold sectors in reserve and remap them to fill in for defective sectors. SSDs have the added twist that they want to maximize the longevity of their cells each of which will ultimately decay over time. To do this, the firmware ensures that a given cell isn't written far more frequently than any other cell, a process called wear-leveling for obvious reasons.

To summarize, subsequent writes to the same LBA, the same virtual location, on an SSD could land on different physical cells for the several reasons listed. The firmware is, more often than not, deterministic thus two identical SSDs with the exact same physical media and I/O stream (as in a mirror) would behave identically, but minor timing variations in the commands from operating software, and differences in the media (described below) ensure that the identical SSDs will behave differently. As time passes, those differences are magnified such that two SSDs that started with the same mapping between virtual offsets and physical media will quickly and completely diverge.

Flash hardware and physics

Identical SSDs with identical firmware, still have their own physical flash memory which can vary in quality. To break the problem apart a bit, an SSD is composed of many cells, and each cell's ability to retain data slowly degrades as it's exercised. Each cell is in fact a physical component of an integrated circuit composed. Flash memory differs from many other integrated circuits in that it requires far higher voltages than others. It is this high voltage that causes the oxide layer to gradually degrade over time. Further, all cells are not created equal — microscopic variations in the thickness and consistency of the physical medium can make some cells more resilient and others less; some cells might be DOA, while others might last significantly longer than the norm. By analogy, if you install new light bulbs in a fixture, they might burn out in the same month, but how often do they fail on the same day? The variability of flash cells impacts the firmware's management of the underlying cells, but more trivially it means that two SSDs in a mirror would experience dataloss of corrsponding regions at different rates.

Wrapping up

As with conventional hard drives, mirroring SSDs is a good idea to preserve data integrity. The operating system, filesystem, SSD firmware, and physical properties of the flash medium make this approach sound both in theory and in practice. Flash is a new exciting technology and changes many of the assumptions derived from decades of experience with hard drives. As always proceed with care — especially when your data is at stake — but get the facts, and in this case the wisdom of conventional hard drives still applies.

Tuesday Mar 10, 2009

SSDs for HSPs

We're announcing a couple of new things in the flash SSD space. First, support the Intel X25-E SSD in a bunch of our servers. This can be used to create a Hybrid Storage Pool like in the Sun Storage 7000 series, or as just a little flash for high performance / low power / tough environmentals.

Second, we're introducing a new open standard with the Open Flash Module. This creates a new form factor for SSDs bringing flash even closer to the CPU for higher performance and tighter system integration. SSDs in HDD form factors were a reasonable idea to gain market acceptance in much the same way as you first listened to your iPod over your car stereo with that weird tape adapter. Now the iPod is a first class citizen in many cars and, with the Open Flash Module, flash has found a native interface and form factor. This is a building block that we're very excited about, and it was designed specifically for use with ZFS and the Hybrid Storage Pool. Stay tuned: these flash miniDIMMs as they're called will be showing up in some interesting places soon enough. Speaking personally, this represents an exciting collaboration of hardware and software, and it's gratifying to see Sun showing real leadership around flash through innovation.

Saturday Mar 07, 2009

Presentation: Hybrid Storage Pools and SSDs

Today at The First Workshop on Integrating Solid-state Memory into the Storage Hierarchy (WISH 2009) I gave a short talk about our experience integrating flash into the storage hierarchy and the interaction with SSDs. In the talk I discussed the recent history of flash SSDs as well as some key areas for future improvements. You can download it here. The workshop was terrific with some great conversations about the state of solid state storage and its future directions; thank you to the organizers and participants.

Monday Mar 02, 2009

More from the storage anarchist

In my last blog post I responded to Barry Burke author of the Storage Anarchist blog. I was under the perhaps naive impression that Barry was an independent voice in the blogosphere. In fact, he's merely Storage Anarchist by night; by day he's the mild-mannered chief strategy officer for EMC's Symmetrix Products Group — a fact notable for its absence from Barry's blog. In my post, I observed that Barry had apparently picked his horse in the flash race and Chris Caldwell commented that "it would appear that not only has he chosen his horse, but that he's planted squarely on its back wearing an EMC jersey." Indeed.

While looking for some mention of his employment with EMC, I found this petard from Barry Burke chief strategy officer for EMC's Symmetrix Products Group:

And [the "enterprise" differentiation] does matter – recall this video of a Fishworks JBOD suffering a 100x impact on response times just because the guy yells at a drive. You wouldn't expect that to happen with an enterprise class disk drive, and with enterprise-class drives in an enterprise-class array, it won't.

Barry, we wondered the same thing so we got some time on what you'd consider an enterprise-class disk drive in an enterprise-class array from an enterprise-class vendor. The results were nearly identical (of course, measuring latency on other enterprise-class solutions isn't nearly as easy). It turns out drives don't like being shouted at (it's shock, not the traditional RV drives compensate for). That enterprise-class rig was not an EMC Symmetrix though I'd salivate over the opportunity to shout at one.

Thursday Feb 26, 2009

Dancing with the Anarchist

Barry Burke, the Storage Anarchist, has written an interesting roundup ("don't miss the amazing vendor flash dance") covering the flash strategies of some players in the server and storage spaces. Sun's position on flash comes out a bit mangled, but Barry can certainly be forgiven for missing the mark since Sun hasn't always communicated its position well. Allow me to clarify our version of the flash dance.

Barry's conclusion that Sun sees flash as well-suited for the server isn't wrong — of course it's harder to drive high IOPS and low latency outside a single box. However we've also proven not only that we see a big role for flash in storage, but that we're innovating in that realm with the Hybrid Storage Pool (HSP) an architecture that seamlessly integrates flash into the storage hierarchy. Rather than a Ron Popeil-esque sales pitch, let me take you through the genesis of the HSP.

The HSP is something we started to develop a bit over two years ago. By January of 2007, we had identified that a ZFS intent-log device using flash would greatly improve the performance of the nascent Sun Storage 7000 series in a way that was simpler and more efficient that some other options. We started getting our first flash SSD samples in February of that year. With SSDs on the brain, we started contemplating other uses and soon came up with the idea of using flash as a secondary caching tier between the DRAM cache (the ZFS ARC) and disk. We dubbed this the L2ARC.

At that time we knew that we'd be using mostly 7200 RPM disks in the 7000 series. Our primary goal with flash was to greatly improve the performance of synchronous writes and we addressed this with the flash log device that we call Logzilla. With the L2ARC we solved the other side of the performance equation by improving read IOPS by leaps and bounds over what hard drives of any rotational speed could provide. By August of 2007, Brendan had put together the initial implementation of the L2ARC, and, combined with some early SSD samples — Readzillas — our initial enthusiasm was borne out. Yes, it's a caching tier so some workloads will do better than others, but customers have been very pleased with their results.

These two distinct uses of flash comprise the Hybrid Storage Pool. In April 2008 we gave our first public talk about the HSP at the IDF in Shanghai, and a year and a bit after Brendan's proof of concept we shipped the 7410 with Logzilla and Readzilla. It's important to note that this system achieves remarkable price/performance through its marriage of commodity disks with flash. Brendan has done a terrific job of demonstrating the performance enabled by the HSP on that system.

While we were finishing the product, the WSJ reported that EMC was starting to use flash drives into their products. I was somewhat deflated initially until it became clear that EMC's solution didn't integrate flash into the storage hierarchy nearly as seamlessly or elegantly as we had with the HSP; instead they had merely replaced their fastest, most expensive drives with faster and even more expensive SSDs. I'll disagree with the Storage Anarchist's conclusion: EMC did not start the flash revolution nor are they leading the way (though I don't doubt they are, as Barry writes, "Taking Our Passion, And Making It Happen"). EMC though has done a great service to the industry by extolling the virtues of SSDs and, presumably, to EMC customers by providing a faster tier for HSM.

In the same article, Barry alludes to some of the problems with EMC's approach using SSDs from STEC:

STEC rates their ZeusIOPS drives at something north of 50,000 read IOPS each, but as I have explained before, this is a misleading number because it’s for 512-byte blocks, read-only, without the overhead of RAID protection. A more realistic expectation is that the drives will deliver somewhere around 5-6000 4K IOPS (4K is a more typical I/O block size).
The Hybrid Storage Pool avoids the bottlenecks associated with a tier 0 approach, drives much higher IOPS, scales, and makes highly efficient economical use of the resources from flash to DRAM and disk. Further, I think we'll be able to debunk this notion that the enterprise needs its own class of flash devices by architecting commodity flash to build an enterprise solution. There are a lot of horses in this race; Barry has clearly already picked his, but the rest of you may want survey the field.

Monday Feb 23, 2009

HSP talk at the OpenSolaris Storage Summit

The organizers of the OpenSolaris Storage Summit asked me to give a presentation about Hybrid Storage Pools and ZFS. You can download the presentation titled ZFS, Cache, and Flash. In it, I talk about flash as a new caching tier in the storage hierarchy, some of the innovations in ZFS to enable the HSP, and an aside into the how we implement an HSP in the Sun Storage 7410.

Thursday Feb 19, 2009

Flash workshop at ASPLOS

Before this year's ASPLOS conference, I'll be speaking at the First Workshop on Integrating Solid-state Memory into the Storage Hierarchy (WISH2009). It looks like a great program with some terrific papers on how to use flash effectively and how to combine various solid state technologies to complement conventional storage.

I'll be talking about the work we've done at Sun on the Hybrid Storage Pool. In addition I'll discuss some of the new opportunities that flash and other solid state technologies create. The workshop takes place in Washington D.C. on March 7th. Hope to see you there.

In semi-related news, along with Eric and Mike I'll be speaking at the OpenSolaris Storage Summit in San Francisco this coming Monday the 23rd.

Update March 7, 2009: I've subsequently posted the slides I used for the WISH 2009 and OpenSolaris Storage Summit 2009 talks.

Monday Oct 20, 2008

Hybrid Storage Pool goes glossy

I've written about Hybrid Storage Pools (HSPs) here several times as well as in an article that appeared in the ACM's Queue and CACM publications. Now the folks in Sun marketing on the occasion of our joint SSD announcement with Intel have distilled that down to a four page glossy, and they've done a terrific job. I suggest taking a look.

The concept behind the HSP is a simple one: combine disk, flash, and DRAM into a single coherent and seamless data store that makes optimal use of each component and its economic niche. The mechanics of how this happens required innovation from the Fishworks and ZFS groups to integrate flash as a new tier in storage hierarchy for use in our forthcoming line of storage products. The impact of the HSP is pure economics: it delivers superior capacity and performance for a lower cost and smaller power footprint. That's the marketing pitch; if you want to wade into the details, check out the links above.

Monday Aug 11, 2008

A glimpse into Netapp's flash future

The latest edition of Communications of the ACM includes a panel discussion between "seven world-class storage experts". The primary topic was flash memory and how it impacts the world of storage. The most interesting comment came from Steve Kleiman, Senior Vice President and Chief Scientist at Netapp:

My theory is that whether it’s flash, phase-change memory, or something else, there is a new place in the memory hierarchy. There was a big blank space for decades that is now filled and a lot of things that need to be rethought. There are many implications to this, and we’re just beginning to see the tip of the iceberg.

The statement itself isn't earth-shattering — it would be immodest to say so as I reached the same conclusion in my own CACM article last month — with price trends and performance characteristics, it's obvious that flash has become relevant; those running the numbers as Steve Kleiman has will come to the same conclusion about how it might integrate into a system. What's interesting is that the person at Netapp "responsible for setting future technology directions for the company" has thrown his weight behind the idea. I look forward to seeing how this is manifested in Netapp's future offerings. Will it look something like the Hybrid Storage Pool (HSP) that we've developed with ZFS? Or might it integrate flash more explicitly into the virtual memory system in ONTAP, Netapp's embedded operating system? Soon enough we should start seeing products in the market that validate our expectations for flash and its impact to enterprise storage.

Wednesday Jul 23, 2008

Hybrid Storage Pools: The L2ARC

I've written recently about the hybrid storage pool (HSP), using ZFS to augment the conventional storage stack with flash memory. The resulting system improve performance, cost, density, capacity, power dissipation — pretty much evey axis of importance.

An important component of the HSP is something called the second level adaptive replacement cache (L2ARC). This allows ZFS to use flash as a caching tier that falls between RAM and disk in the storage hierarchy, and permits huge working sets to be serviced with latencies under 100us. My colleague, Brendan Gregg, implemented the L2ARC, and has written a great summary of how the L2ARC works and some concrete results. Using the L2ARC, Brendan was able to achieve a 730% performance improvement over 7200RPM drives. Compare that with 15K RPM drives which will improve performance by at most 100-200%, while costing more, using more power, and delivering less total capacity than Brendan's configuration. Score one for the hybrid storage pool!

Tuesday Jul 01, 2008

Hybrid Storage Pools in CACM

As I mentioned in my previous post, I wrote an article about the hybrid storage pool (HSP); that article appears in the recently released July issue of Communications of the ACM. You can find it here. In the article, I talk about a novel way of augmenting the traditional storage stack with flash memory as a new level in the hierarchy between DRAM and disk, as well as the ways in which we've adapted ZFS and optimized it for use with flash.

So what's the impact of the HSP? Very simply, the article demonstrates that, considering the axes of cost, throughput, capacity, IOPS and power-efficiency, HSPs can match and exceed what's possible with either drives or flash alone. Further, an HSP can be built or modified to address specific goals independently. For example, it's common to use 15K RPM drives to get high IOPS; unfortunately, they're expensive, power-hungry, and offer only a modest improvement. It's possible to build an HSP that can match the necessary IOPS count at a much lower cost both in terms of the initial investment and the power and cooling costs. As another example, people are starting to consider all-flash solutions to get very high IOPS with low power consumption. Using flash as primary storage means that some capacity will be lost to redundancy. An HSP can provide the same IOPS, but use conventional disks to provide redundancy yielding a significantly lower cost.

My hope — perhaps risibly naive — is that HSPs will mean the eventual death of the 15K RPM drive. If it also puts to bed the notion of flash as general purpose mass storage, well, I'd be happy to see that as well.

Tuesday Jun 10, 2008

Flash, Hybrid Pools, and Future Storage

Jonathan had a terrific post yesterday that does an excellent job of presenting Sun's strategy for flash for the next few years. With my colleagues at Fishworks, an advanced product development team, I've spent more than a year working with flash and figuring out ways to integrate flash into ZFS, the storage hierarchy, and our future storage products — a fact to which John Fowler, EVP of storage, alluded recently. Flash opens surprising new vistas; it's exciting to see Sun leading in this field, and it's frankly exciting to be part of it.

Jonathan's post sketches out some of the basic ideas on how we're going to be integrating flash into ZFS to create what we call hybrid storage pools that combine flash with conventional (cheap) disks to create an aggregate that's cost-effective, power-efficient, and high-performing by capitalizing on the strengths of the component technologies (not unlike a hybrid car). We presented some early results at IDF which has already been getting a bit of buzz. Next month I have an article in Communications of the ACM that provides many more details on what exactly a hybrid pool is and how exactly it works. I've pulled out some excerpts from that article and included them below as a teaser and will be sure to post an update when the full article is available in print and online.

While its prospects are tantalizing, the challenge is to find uses for flash that strike the right balance of cost and performance. Flash should be viewed not as a replacement for existing storage, but rather as a means to enhance it. Conventional storage systems mix dynamic memory (DRAM) and hard drives; flash is interesting because it falls in a sweet spot between those two components for both cost and performance in that flash is significantly cheaper and denser than DRAM and also significantly faster than disk. Flash accordingly can augment the system to form a new tier in the storage hierarchy – perhaps the most significant new tier since the introduction of the disk drive with RAMAC in 1956.

...

A brute force solution to improve latency is to simply spin the platters faster to reduce rotational latency, using 15k RPM drives rather than 10k RPM or 7,200 RPM drives. This will improve both read and write latency, but only by a factor of two or so. ...

...

ZFS provides for the use of a separate intent-log device, a slog in ZFS jargon, to which synchronous writes can be quickly written and acknowledged to the client before the data is written to the storage pool. The slog is used only for small transactions while large transactions use the main storage pool – it's tough to beat the raw throughput of large numbers of disks. The flash-based log device would be ideally suited for a ZFS slog. ... Using such a device with ZFS in a test system, latencies measure in the range of 80-100µs which approaches the performance of NVRAM while having many other benefits. ...

...

By combining the use of flash as an intent-log to reduce write latency with flash as a cache to reduce read latency, we can create a system that performs far better and consumes less power than other system of similar cost. It's now possible to construct systems with a precise mix of write-optimized flash, flash for caching, DRAM, and cheap disks designed specifically to achieve the right balance of cost and performance for any given workload with data automatically handled by the appropriate level of the hierarchy. ... Most generally, this new flash tier can be thought of as a radical form of hierarchical storage management (HSM) without the need for explicit management.

Updated July, 1: I've posted the link to the article in my subsequent blog post.

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Adam Leventhal, Fishworks engineer

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