Adventures in OpenSolaris - Getting to GigE

Note: This entry is part of series which starts here

I have an old computer that I decided to install OpenSolaris on. I have a GigE switch in my lab and decided the onboard, 100MB card was not good enough, and decided to go GigE. The old adage that if ain't broke don't fix it, should have come to mind here, but....

The first thing I did was check the HCL list. With a few models I headed off to MicroCenter. They happened to have a D-Link DGE-530T and since it was on the compatibility list I decided to go for. I installed the card, and followed the instructions on the HCL list. During the installation I got errors and the card does not work.

I went back to the HCL list and looked at the details. The card that is known to work has the following config:
Node 0x00002c
assigned-addresses: 820e0810.00000000.e2000000.00000000.00004000.810e0814.00000000.00002000.00000000.00000100
reg: 000e0800.00000000.00000000.00000000.00000000.020e0810.00000000.00000000.00000000.00004000.010e0814.00000000.00000000.00000000.00000100
compatible: 'pci1186,4b01.1186.4b01.11' + 'pci1186,4b01.1186.4b01' + 'pci1186,4b01' + 'pci1186,4b01.11' + 'pci1186,4b01' + 'pciclass,020000' + 'pciclass,0200'
model: 'Ethernet controller'
power-consumption: 00000001.00000001
66mhz-capable:
fast-back-to-back:
devsel-speed: 00000001
interrupts: 00000001
max-latency: 0000001f
min-grant: 00000017
subsystem-vendor-id: 00001186
subsystem-id: 00004b01
unit-address: '1'
class-code: 00020000
revision-id: 00000011
vendor-id: 00001186
device-id: 00004b01
name: 'pci1186,4b01'

My card has:
Node 0x000010
assigned-addresses: 8100fb20.00000000.0000dc80.00000000.00000020
reg: 0000fb00.00000000.00000000.00000000.00000000.0100fb20.00000000.00000000.00000000.00000020
compatible: 'pci8086,24c3.1028.142.1' + 'pci8086,24c3.1028.142' + 'p model: 'Ethernet controller'
power-consumption: 00000001.00000001
66mhz-capable:
fast-back-to-back:
devsel-speed: 00000001
interrupts: 00000001
max-latency: 0000001f
min-grant: 00000017
subsystem-vendor-id: 00001186
subsystem-id: 00004c00
unit-address: 'c'
class-code: 00020000
revision-id: 00000011
vendor-id: 00001186
device-id: 00004c00
name: 'pci1186,4c00'

Now to be fair I am not a hardware expert, but obviously the names are different. I started googling around and found this blog post. We now know from the blog post that the name defines the Vendor ID and the Product ID. Since the first half is the same, and since they are both DLinks things are adding up.

Now what about the product ID? There is a website that documents all of the unique codes on PCI cards. The websites shows that a 4b01 has a Marvell 88E8001 Chip. The website also shows that the 4c00 has the Marvell 88E8003 Chip. Even though I have a different chipset, I decided to give it whirl and ran the following command:
/usr/sbin/update_drv -a -i "pci1186,4c00" skge

This brought the interface on-line and it seems to be working!

My adventure continues with getting to SATA.

Technorati Tags: ,

Comments:

Post a Comment:
Comments are closed for this entry.
About

user12609114

Search

Top Tags
Categories
Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today