Wednesday Jul 29, 2015

WebLogic Update @ Voxxed Days Istanbul

It's relatively rare Java focused conferences have clearly WebLogic centric sessions. This is understandable as conference organizers must carefully balance between education, vendor-neutrality, sharing useful information and outright sales pitches. The distinction is very tenuous and historically frequently abused at Java conferences. As a result Java conference organizers (and attendees) often choose to err on the side of caution and avoid content focused on commercial products (note that while WebLogic is beyond a doubt a commercially licensed product developers can use it freely on their own local machines with an OTN license). An unfortunate side effect of this problem is that many developers remain woefully unaware of the changes happening in mission critical bits of industry infrastructure such as WebLogic. The exception to this unfortunate situation is events like Oracle OpenWorld and other Oracle technology centric conferences where WebLogic is far better represented.

For these reasons it was a breadth of fresh air to be able to deliver a brief WebLogic centric session at Voxxed Days Istanbul 2015. I am so grateful to the organizers for lending me the benefit of the doubt and recognizing the distinction between selling and informing current/prospective users about important technological changes that can help their organizations. Titled "What's New in WebLogic 12.1.3 and Beyond", the talk essentially covers the very important hard work that we have already done in WebLogic 12.1.3 including supporting some of the most critical Java EE 7 APIs as well as the fundamental changes coming soon in WebLogic 12.2.1 including full Java EE 7 platform support. Below is the slide deck for the talk (click here if you can't see the embedded slide deck.):

If you have not yet taken a look at WebLogic 12.1.3 and the road map for 12.2.1, the deck should offer a quick way to do so. Here is the abstract for the talk to give you better context:

WebLogic 12.1.3 was released about a year ago. It brings a large set of changes including support for some key new Java EE 7 APIs such as WebSocket, JAX-RS 2, JSON-P and JPA 2.1, support for Java SE 8, WebSocket fallback support, support for Server-Sent Events (SSE), improved Maven support, enhanced REST administration support, Oracle Database 12c driver support and much, much more. In this session we will take a detailed tour of these features. In addition we will also cover updated WebLogic support in the Oracle Cloud, the new Oracle public Maven repository, using WebLogic with Arquillian for testing and well as official Docker support for WebLogic. Towards the end of the session we will discuss what's coming in WebLogic 12.2.1 this year including full support for Java EE 7, multi-tenancy and more.

Besides the brief WebLogic talk I also covered Java EE 7 and Java EE 8 at Voxxed Days Istanbul as well as the Istanbul and Ankara JUG. More details of the event are posted on my personal blog.

Friday Jul 17, 2015

Accessing WebLogic Logs via REST

One of the most significant changes in the WebLogic 12.1.3 release is improvements in the REST management interface. Oracle ACE Director and WebLogic expert Dr. Frank Munz does a very nice job summarizing the changes on his blog. The REST management capability is really quite a nice addition to the existing DevOps oriented capabilities such as WLST and of course the admin console. One of the very interesting things you can do via the REST management interface in WebLogic 12.1.3 is easily access all WebLogic logs. Dr. Frank Munz explains nicely step by step how to do this via another excellent blog entry well worth a read.

The best way to learn the details of the REST management capabilities is of course always the WebLogic documentation.

Tuesday Jun 30, 2015

Oracle Cloud Application Foundation Innovation Awards Now Open for Nominations!

Is your organization using Oracle Cloud Application Foundation that includes Oracle WebLogic Server, Oracle Coherence and Oracle Tuxedo to deliver unique business value? The Innovation Awards awards honor our customers and partners for their cutting-edge solutions. Winners are selected based on the uniqueness of their business case, business benefits, level of impact relative to the size of the organization, complexity and magnitude of implementation, and the originality of architecture.

The 2015 awards will be presented during Oracle OpenWorld 2015, October 26-29, in San Francisco.

Submit your nomination for WebLogic/Coherence/Tuxedo by July 31!

Award winners receive:

  • Oracle Fusion Middleware Innovation Award for WebLogic trophy
  • One free pass to Oracle OpenWorld 2015
  • Priority consideration for placement in Profit magazine, Oracle Magazine, or other Oracle publications and press releases
  • Oracle Fusion Middleware Innovation logo for inclusion on your own website and/or press release   

All nominees receive consideration for:

  • Participating in OpenWorld panels and speaking opportunities
  • Featured Customer Success Story on Oracle.com
  • Placement in Profit magazine and/or Oracle Magazine
  • Placement in an Oracle press release or Oracle Fusion Middleware podcast
Nomination deadline: 5:00 p.m. PT July 31, 2015
All nominated solutions should be in production or in active pilot phase

For additional information, please email Innovation-Middleware_us@oracle.com

Thursday Jun 18, 2015

Managing Logs in WebLogic

Logging is your first line of defense in terms administering, debugging and monitoring any part of the data center and especially the application server. WebLogic generates a number of very helpful log files for that reason. In addition WebLogic also provides ways to robustly manage these log files in terms of tuning things like log rotation and filtering. Ahmed Aboulnaga introduces some of these capabilities in a recent article on OTech Magazine (his article is mostly focused on the admin console).

The most detailed and up-to-date way to learn about WebLogic logging is always of course the WebLogic documentation. For example a couple of important logging aspects the article does not get into include configuring the logs themselves as well as easily viewing the logs through the WebLogic console.

Friday Jun 05, 2015

A Gentle Introduction to the WebLogic Diagnostic Framework (WLDF)

The WebLogic Diagnostic Framework (WLDF) is a powerful feature that has been around since WebLogic 9. It is an extremely robust way of live monitoring and diagnostics for the server, the underlying JVM, deployed applications and configured resources. Few if any other Java application servers can match the capabilities offered by WLDF. If you using WebLogic in production and don't know about WLDF, you are doing yourself a serious disservice.

Because of the power and flexibility offered by WLDF, it is not trivial to pick up and for some can be daunting. Fortunately Mike Croft of Oracle partner C2B2 consulting can help us out. He wrote up a very nice series of blog entries as a gentle introduction to WLDF. He provides a high level overview and discusses watches, notifications and the monitoring dashboard. The definitive way to learn about WLDF is of course always the latest WebLogic documentation :-).

Friday May 29, 2015

Your Opinion Wanted - What Would You Like to See in OTN Virtual Summits?

If you don't know about the OTN Virtual Technology Summit yet, you are doing yourself a serious disfavor. The summit is a set of free online events covering various technical topics such as Java SE and Java EE but also WebLogic, Coherence, Middleware, Database and so on. Each topic is presented by a subject matter expert coming either from Oracle or from the community (Java Champions, Oracle ACEs and so on). During each session a live chat lets participants ask questions and clarifications on the presented subject. The summit is held four time a year!

Now you can chime in to tell us exactly what you would like to see in terms of middleware content in the summit. Of course we not-so-secretly hope you will ask for more Java EE, WebLogic or Coherence content! You can voice your opinion at any time using this public page on the Oracle Community site. Beyond simply asking for a topic, you are also most welcome to nominate yourself or someone else you know as a speaker. It's a great way of sharing your knowledge and getting some recognition, so don't be shy!

Thursday Apr 02, 2015

An Introduction to WLST Script Profiles

In case you are not familiar with WLST (the WebLogic Scripting Tool), it is a powerful scripting runtime for administering WebLogic domains. Jython is used as the scripting language. Although other application servers now boast similar capabilities, WebLogic was one of the earliest to innovate this feature around 2006 with WebLogic 9. In fact, WLST maintains the most impressive set of features compared to competing offerings.

WLST is of course just one way of administering WebLogic. You can also work with WebLogic domains using Ant, Maven, the command line and of course the user-friendly admin console depending on your needs and preferences. WLST is particularly useful for automating entire deployment environments or complex administration scenarios. Matt Brasier of C2B2 Consulting (an Oracle partner) recently did an excellent talk on WLST. The slide deck for his talk is embedded below:

We also recently caught up with Peter Bowers, a key developer on the WebLogic team about WLST. He talked to us about the WLST script profile feature, including some cool sample code and a demo. Here's the video with Peter:

The best place to learn more about WLST is none other than the excellent latest WebLogic docs on the topic.

Tuesday Mar 24, 2015

Oracle WebLogic Server Now Running on Docker Containers

We are very excited to announce that Oracle WebLogic Server is now certified to run on Docker containers. As part of the certification, we are releasing Dockerfiles and supporting scripts on GitHub to build images for Oracle WebLogic Server.  These images are built as an extension of existing Oracle Linux images Oracle Linux Images. You can use these Oracle WebLogic Server Docker images or create your own. To help you with this, we have posted Dockerfiles and scripts on GitHub as examples for you to get started.

Docker is a platform that enables users to build, package, ship and run distributed applications. Docker users package up their applications, and any dependent libraries or files, into a Docker image. Docker images are portable artifacts that can be distributed across Linux environments. Images that have been distributed can be used to instantiate containers where applications can run in isolation from other applications running in other containers on the same host operating system.

The table below describes the certification provided for various WebLogic Server versions. You can use these combinations of Oracle WebLogic Server, JDK, Linux and Docker versions when building your Docker images.

 Oracle WebLogic Server
JDK Version
Host OS
Kernel Docker Version
 12.1.3  7/8  Oracle Lunux 6 UL 5+
 Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 3 (3.8.13)+
 1.3.3+
 12.1.3  7/8  Oracle Linux 7 UL 0+

 Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 3 (3.8.13)+

or

Red Hat  Compatible Kernel (3.10)+

 1.3.3+
 12.1.3  7/8

 Red Hat Enterprise

Linux 7+

 Red Hat  Enterprise Linux Kernel (3.10)+  1.3.3+

For additional details on the most current Oracle WebLogic Server supported configurations please refer to Oracle Fusion Middleware Certification Pages.

These Dockerfiles and scripts we have provided enable users to create clustered and non-clustered Oracle WebLogic Server domain configurations, including both development and production running on a single host operating system or VMs. Each server running in the resulting domain configurations runs in its Docker container, and is capable of communicating as required with other servers. For documentation on how to use these Dockerfiles and scripts, see the whitepaper on OTN.  The Oracle WebLogic Server on Docker and Demo  video presents our certification effort and shows a Demo of WebLogic Server running on Docker Containers. Other configurations and approaches are possible, but we hope these help get you started. We look forward to your feedback.

Monday Mar 09, 2015

WLS JDBC Driver Patching

The handling of Oracle driver jar patches is complicated but getting sorted out. This article tries to gather the information in one place with pointers to more details.  There are a few patches that are still not available, marked as TBA (To Be Available) in the tables below.  As these files become available, this page will be updated.

WLS 10.3.6, 12.1.1, and 12.1.1 shipped Database 11.2.0.3 jar files.  However these are non-standard versions of the jars with additional bug fixes and enhancements to support WLS.  That means that you can't just drop in an 11.2.0.3 patch or upgrade to 11.2.0.4 using standard released jar files. Although support is required to provide 11.2.0.3 patches as needed, it will be difficult and the recommendation is to upgrade to a special 11.2.0.4 patch that contains 11.2.0.4 and all of the patches and enhancements in the 11.2.0.3 database jar files shipped with WLS. It's further complicated because WLS started using the Oracle Universal Installer in 12.1.2, requiring a different patch format.

WLS 10.3.6, 12.1.1, 12.1.2, and 12.1.3 also support running with Oracle Database 12c client jar files. For WLS 10.3.6 through 12.1.2, the jar files must be manually installed; there is no installer or patch to automate this upgrade. To get patches, you must be running with the Database 12.1.0.2 jar files; WLS patches will not be generated for the Database 12.1.0.1 jar files. WLS 12.1.3 ships with a pre-release version of Database 12.1.0.2 driver jar files and a patch will be available to upgrade to the production version of these files. After this upgrade, standard database Oracle patch files will work as expected for WLS 12.1.3 (and WLS 12.1.2 with a manual upgrade to database 12.1.0.2 jar files).

Patching the installed Oracle Driver

WLS Release

Oracle Driver Install

Database Jar

Patch Strategy

Documentation

10.3.6

11.2.0.3.0AS11.1.1.6.0

11.2.0.4 WLS patch

https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocumentDisplay?id=1970437.1

12.1.1

11.2.0.3.0AS11.1.1.6.0

11.2.0.4 WLS patch

https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocumentDisplay?id=1970437.1

12.1.2

11.2.0.3.0AS12.1.2.0.0

11.2.0.4 opatch

Patch Request 18557114 for bug 19477203

12.1.3

Pre-12.1.0.2

12.1.0.2 opatch to bring up to shipping 12.1.0.2; standard opatch for additional bug fixes

TBA soon


























Running with the Database 12c Driver

WLS Release

12.1.0.2 installation

Database Jar Patch Strategy

Documentation for Installation
Documentation for patching

10.3.6

Manual installation of 12.1.0.2

12.1.0.2 WLS patch

https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocumentDisplay?id=1564509.1
TBA

12.1.1

Manual installation of 12.1.0.2

12.1.0.2 WLS patch

https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocumentDisplay?id=1564509.1
TBA

12.1.2

Manual installation of 12.1.0.2

12.1.0.2 opatch

https://docs.oracle.com/middleware/1212/wls/JDBCA/ds_12cdriver.htm#JDBCA272

Standard patch procedure

12.1.3

Pre-12.1.0.2 installed; Patch to bring up to shipping 12.1.0.2

12.1.0.2 opatch

https://docs.oracle.com/middleware/1213/wls/JDBCA/ds_12cdriver.htm#JDBCA272

TBA soon for make-up patch

Standard patch procedure

On a related topic, updating non-Oracle driver jar files is covered by the following note.

https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocumentDisplay?id=1

This includes the DataDirect and MySQL drivers that are shipped in the kit. The jar file is backed up and removed, the new file installed, and the CLASSPATH adjusted if the jar name changes.

You'll notice that releases earlier than WLS 10.3.6 are not discussed.  For releases earlier than WLS 10.3.4, they depend only on the ojdbcN.jar file.  It's possible that they will work with the 11.2.0.4 jar file but that hasn't been certified and they are not still in error correction support.  For WLS 10.3.4 or 10.3.5, it depends not only on a specific ojdbc jar file but also ONS/UCP jars that have the package names renamed.  They will likely not work correctly with the 11.2.0.4 jar file (certainly not Active GridLink).  Since these releases ended error correction support in May 2012, you will need to upgrade to WLS 10.3.6 or 12.1.x to use later driver jar files.

Thursday Feb 26, 2015

OpenWorld Double Dose: Maximum Availability in the Cloud

Integrated, high availability IT infrastructure capabilities are critical for reducing downtime and costs, and creating ideal performance and SLA results. In this next session of the Oracle Open World 2014 series, Shari Yamaguchi and Frances Zhao from Oracle’s Product Management team share best practices on how to architect highly available multi-data center solutions. They also share what real world customers are doing to achieve maximum available architectures with WebLogic Server—so be sure to check out the video itself here (http://bit.ly/oow14cafsessions) for those highly relevant case studies and proven strategies.

What is Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA)?

Maximum availability architecture (MAA) incorporates the high availability solutions that Oracle has invested in and built out across the stack. The key focus is on ensuring customers’ businesses and applications can fully meet their end-user community’s needs and requirements. In today’s world, downtime is no longer an option, but a given—and this is why Oracle has strategically invested in end-to-end MAA solutions to ensure your systems stay up and running across the board. At the end of the day, the #1 priority is that your end users can get to the environments and applications they need to within a specified period of time.

MAA Strategy & Investment

Within IT, customers need a quick way to easily get a view of what's going on across all their data centers, environments, and applications so that in case of a sudden performance degradation or failure, alerts are immediately sent to the right administrators. Given the importance of manageability, Oracle has invested significantly in Enterprise Manager Grid Control (EMGC), building tools within EMGC for easier monitoring and management such as job systems for automated patching and backup. The Oracle Traffic Director has also been a key tool in connecting the management console to the middle-tier—it is a front-end WebLogic Server that handles web-tier requests and routes them to different clusters.

From a Database 12c perspective, features like Flashback provde significant capabilities especially for those connected to applications, because customers can bring up a test environment, read and write against that environment, validate, shut it back down, flash it back to a previous state, and continue rolling forward through a recovery. Active GridLink, Data Guard, and Site Guard are also key investment areas that allow seamless and automatic failover between different RAC instances. Finally, Coherence is another big investment area as it is a high-end caching product that provides an integrated solution with WebLogic. With session replication, Coherence can be used not only to offset your data from database, but also could be high-availability disaster recovery solution for your WebLogic Server session state.

Core Technologies and MAA Features

To support these core investments in maximum availability, there are three primary areas of technology that Oracle focuses on implementing to support MAA in its platform architecture. The first area is management configuration monitoring—with Enterprise Manager and Site Guard, we monitor your product across different data centers. The second area is in RPO (recovery point objective)—which is related to how fast you can move your data for replication and for recovery—Oracle is investing in file base data replication. And finally, for RTO (recovery time objective)—which is related to how fast you can recover your transactions—one huge new feature is XA transaction recovery, removing the need to write every transaction statement in the T-log and making transactions automatically recoverable.

In conclusion, MAA is extremely critical to your business, which is why it is a huge priority for Oracle. The complete Oracle Solution is a global-level management configuration with Enterprise Manager, RPO, and RTO runtime for the middle-tier (including WebLogic, Coherence, and Oracle Traffic Director), and an integrated back-end database. Any one-tier disaster recovery adds value but the real importance lies in connecting all the pieces together, to maximize operational efficiency and minimize risk. 

Thursday Feb 19, 2015

Calling All WebLogic Users: Please Help Us Improve WebLogic Documentation!

Great documentation is key to the usability of any good product - WebLogic is most certainly not an exception. The WebLogic documentation team tries hard to do the best job they can. It's not a particularly easy job with a product as feature rich as WebLogic that has a continuous cadence of evolution.

The best way to make sure we have great documentation is getting feedback from you - the user. For this reason we are collecting feedback through an open survey on WebLogic documentation. The public survey is available here. The survey is just two pages, should take you a few minutes to fill out and will greatly help the WebLogic user community. Your opinion is worth it's weight in gold!

As a reminder, the latest WebLogic documentation is available here.

The survey is slated to close the end of February, but could be extended if there is a sustained stream of feedback.

Wednesday Feb 11, 2015

Is your IT private PaaS ready? Take this 10-minute Assessment to find out

By the end of 2015, end-user spending on cloud services is expected to exceed $180 billion[1]. The shift toward cloud is undeniable, as is the need for hybrid cloud. Driven by legal, political, security, control, historical, cultural [add more reasons here] needs, organizations will continue to run some of their applications inside their firewall (in addition to running many of their applications on a public cloud), which will ultimately drive the need to create a private cloud infrastructure.

From the extensive insights we’ve compiled as leaders from our product and consulting teams have engaged with customers architecting their cloud infrastructure, we have developed an assessment for you to determine your IT organization’s private PaaS readiness. The tool comes with a 4-tiered dashboard based on the cloud adoption & maturity levels we’ve seen from hundreds of our customers, ranging from “preliminary” to “strategic.” Your organization’s current readiness rating is coupled with specific action items to help you reach the “strategic” level.

Take 10 minutes now to begin your private PaaS journey. Once you go through this assessment, you will receive a comprehensive 12-page report describing your PaaS adoption vis-a-vi your business strategy, governance, organization, integration and more. Not only that, we will compare your maturity with those of your peers, hundreds of whom have already taken the assessment, and include that comparison data in the report so you have a benchmark of your PaaS adoption readiness. Don’t get left behind. Take the assessment now!


[1] Gartner: http://www.informationweek.com/cloud/infrastructure-as-a-service/gartner-tells-outsourcers-embrace-cloud-or-die/d/d-id/1110991

Tuesday Feb 10, 2015

Oracle Maven Repository - Viewing Contents in Eclipse

Our own Steve Button has published a great blog on using the new Oracle Maven Repository with Eclipse.
Get started here, and then read the full entry.



With the Oracle Maven Repository now accessible one way to have explore its contents is to use the Maven Repositories viewer feature available in most development tools. I've seen the repository contents displayed easily in NetBeans so I decided to take a look at what it looks like in Eclipse as well.

I had to make a few minor setting changes to get it to work so decided to document them here.  If you've gotten it to work with less setting changes, let me know!

As initial setup, I configured my local maven environment to support access to the Oracle Maven Repository.  This is documented here https://maven.oracle.com/doc.html.  I also installed maven-3.2.5 that includes the updated Wagon module that supports authentication.

Next I downloaded and used the new network installer that the Oracle Eclipse team has published on OTN to install the latest version of Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse.



This network installer lets developers select the version of Eclipse to install and the set of Oracle extensions --  Weblogic, GlassFish and other stuff -- to add in to it.

 Once Eclipse is installed, you can add the Maven Repository viewer by selecting   Window > Show View > Other > Maven Repositories from the Eclipse toolbar.



I also added a Console > Maven viewer to see what was happening under the covers and arranged them so they were visible at the same time:


With the Maven views ready to go, expand the Global Repositories node. This will show Maven Central (any other repositories you may have configured) and the Oracle Maven Repository if you have configured it correctly in the settings.xml file.

The initial state of the Oracle Maven Repository doesn't show any contents indicating that its index hasn't been downloaded to display.

Right mouse clicking on it and selecting the Rebuild Index option causes an error to be shown in the console output indicating that the index could not be accessed.


To get it to work, I made the following changes to my environment.  

Configure Eclipse to Use Maven 3.2.5

Using the Eclipse > Preferences > Maven > Installation dialog, configure Eclipse to use Maven 3.2.5.  This is preferred version of Maven to use to access the Oracle Maven Repository since it automatically includes the necessary version of the Wagon HTTP module that supports the required authentication configuration and request flow.


Configure Proxy Settings in Maven Settings File

** If you don't need a proxy to access the Internet then step won't be needed **

If you sit behind a firewall and need to use a proxy server to access public repositories then you need to configure a proxy setting inside the maven settings file.

...Read the rest on Steve's blog!

Thursday Feb 05, 2015

WebLogic and Arquillian: A Bare-Bones Example

The Arquillian project is getting quite popular for testing code and applications, and it's no wonder. Its sweet spot is testing Java EE applications inside the container. Steve Button on our Product Management team recently
published a blog we wanted to highlight that shows how to get started using Arquillian with WebLogic.


As Steve notes:
Arquillian uses the concept of container adapters to allow it to execute test code with a specific test environment. For the Java EE area, most of the Java EE implementations have an adapter than can be used to perform the deployment of the archive under test and to execute and report on the results of the unit tests.

He then provides some resources for you, and guides you to a GitHub repository to get up and running in a bare-bones fashion.

Read the entire blog here.

Thanks, Steve!


Executing Tests using NetBeans

Friday Jan 30, 2015

Exciting News: Prime Content from OpenWorld 2014… Highlighting WebLogic Strategy and Roadmap

This one is for those of you who haven’t developed that app [iphone or otherwise] which defies the laws of physics and lets us be at two sessions at once at OpenWorld. The good folks at Oracle University recorded many OpenWorld sessions and some of the most prominent Cloud Application Foundation sessions are now available here. I wanted to kick it off with the WebLogic Server Strategy and Roadmap session hosted by Will Lyons, Head of WebLogic Product Management. So sit back, relax, and enjoy your weekend watching the show!

Will talks about how to leverage WebLogic today and in the future, sharing WebLogic’s current features as well as illustrating the product’s future capabilities in the impending 2015 release of WebLogic 12.1.3. Oracle is investing in several strategic areas for WebLogic and Java Cloud Service (JCS) to ensure complete flexibility for our customers with their cloud and on-premises applications. The investment areas include improved performance, scalability, and availability for applications deployed on WebLogic and JCS, cloud-level management to simplify provisioning of WebLogic environments, multitenancy, ease of deployment flexibility, improved developer environment, and more.

Recap WebLogic 12.1.3 — Easier Development, Cloud Scale Management, and the Java Cloud Service

In the most recent WebLogic version 12.1.3, released in July 2014, new features include improved Oracle Fusion Middleware product support, mobile client application development features, and performance and availability innovations from the beginning of the development lifecycle.

For instance, the OTN Free Developer license makes WebLogic easier to get started and free for development on developer desktops, and includes refined language to broaden applicability and usage. With traditional Oracle licensing, developers could develop on their desktop for free but once applications were put in production, licensing fees would apply on the desktop where applications were developed. Now, the entire development lifecycle is free. Developer zip updates also update zip distributions with Patch Set updates for automatic bug fixes and common developer issues.

Other improvements include high availability and performance via simplified disaster recovery with 3x better output due to transactional updates without TLOG transaction writes, and Exalogic optimizations such as JMS replicated stores. Improvements in cloud scale management also see dynamic clusters that eliminate the need to create clustered configuration and managed server configurations to those clusters (ie machines, listen ports, etc.), allowing for enhanced JMS support and maximum scaling. In doing this, there is seamless upgrade, application compatibility, and interoperability with previous WebLogic versions, as well as flexibility and choice for development and runtime. Developers can now take advantage of all the latest Java SE technology, such as JDK 8 improved memory management features.

Perhaps one of the most exciting developments in WebLogic 12.1.3 is the release of Oracle Java Cloud Service, which allows customers to deploy full-featured WebLogic instances anywhere with full ability to move applications on-premise to the cloud and vice versa. Java Cloud Service includes a self-service provisioning interface which makes it easier to provision clusters and domains. There is also an option of exposing the entire surface area of the WebLogic server to do whatever you need to replicate on-premise environments to the Oracle cloud and vice-versa, with full compatibility.

WebLogic 12.2.1 Roadmap — What is Coming?

WebLogic 12.2.1, to be released in 2015, will see even further advancements including multitenancy, built-in elasticity, a REST-based management infrastructure, disaster recovery improvements, Java EE 7 support, and more seamless Exalogic integration. A truly differentiating factor is WebLogic’s multitenancy capabilities - in other words, its ability to run applications supporting multiple tenants within the same server cluster, domain, or instance.

A brand new innovation in WebLogic is a new configuration construct called a partition, which represents a ‘slice’ of a domain that can span all the servers running in your domain. Each partition can be dedicated to tenants, providing appropriate levels of end-to-end isolation of resources among partitions so you can deploy resources individually though they share a domain. Examples include memory and CPU isolation at the JVM level, or separate work managers. This concept is highly significant as it dramatically decreases density of deployments on WebLogic server, and allows customers to get far better utilization of their infrastructure. It is also a great use for consolidation--ie departmental applications that maintain isolation between multiple applications but want the same domain.

This multitenancy provides strategic end-to-end value that is completely unique to Oracle, as it will be implemented not just at the application server level but will be integrated into the entire Cloud Application Foundation stack. Elastic clusters in WebLogic 12.2.1 will also define configurable rules for cluster scaling that will help customers define actions like scaling a cluster up or down, scheduling defined by workloads or time of day, or driving other configuration changes.

Finally, there are also improvements to the Exalogic Elastic Cloud Software 12c, on which WebLogic Server is supported and optimized for. In 2015, Exalogic will allow for capabilities to build private clouds that run on the same IaaS and PaaS provisioning technology in Java Cloud Service, as well as similar interfaces.

Well, I really cant cover 45 minutes worth of content in one blog, although I tried. So go ahead and take a listen at Will’s sessions that is hosted at http://bit.ly/oow14cafsessions. Next week, we will highlight the Coherence Roadmap and Strategy session for the in-memory data grid buffs amongst you.

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