Sunday Nov 15, 2015

Deploying Java EE 7 Applications to Partitions from Eclipse

The new WebLogic Server 12.2.1 Multi-tenant feature enables partitions to be created in a domain that are isolated from one another and able to be managed independently of one another. From a development perspective, this isolation opens up some interesting opportunities - for instance it enables the use of a single domain to be shared by multiple developers, working on the same application, without them needing to worry about collisions of URLs or cross accessing of resources.

The lifecycle of a partition can be managed independently of others so starting and stopping the partition to start and stop applications can be done with no impact on other users of the shared domain. A partition can be exported (unplugged) from a domain, including all of it's resources and application bits that are deployed, and imported (plugged) into a completely different domain to restore the exact same partition in the new location. This enables complete, working applications to be shared and moved between between different environments in a very straightforward manner.

As an illustration of this concept of using partitions within a development environment, the YouTube video - WebLogic Server 12.2.1 - Deploying Java EE 7 Application to Partitions - takes the Java EE 7 CargoTracker application and deploys it to different targets from Eclipse.

  • In the first instance, CargoTracker is deployed to a known WebLogic Server target using the well known "Run as Server" approach, with which Eclipse will start the configured server and deploy the application to the base domain.
  • Following that, using a partition that has been created on the same domain called "test", the same application code-base is built and deployed to the partition using maven and the weblogic-maven-plugin. The application is accessed in its partition using its Virtual Target mapping and shown to be working as expected.
  • To finish off the demonstration the index page of the CargoTracker application is modified to mimic a development change and deployed to another partition called "uat" - where it is accessed and seen that the page change is active.
  • At this point, all three instances of the same application are running independently on the same server and are accessible at the same time, essentially showing how a single domain can independently host multiple instances of the same application as it is being developed.

Tuesday Nov 03, 2015

Using Eclipse with WebLogic Server 12.2.1

With the installation of WebLogic Server 12.2.1 now including the Eclipse Network Installer, which enables developers to  download and install Eclipse including the specific features of interest, getting up and running with Eclipse and WebLogic Server has never been easier.

The Eclipse Network Installer presents developers with a guided interface to enable the custom installation of an Eclipse environment through the selection of an Eclipse version to be installed and which of the available capabilities are required - such as Java EE 7, Maven, Coherence, WebLogic, WLST, Cloud and Database tools amongst others.  It will then download the selected components and install them directly on the developers machine

Eclipse and the Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse plugins continue to provide extensive support for WebLogic Server enabling it to be used to throughout the software lifecycle; from develop and test cycles with its Java EE dialogs,  assistants and deployment plugins; through to automation of configuration and provisioning of environments with the authoring, debugging and running of scripts using the WLST Script Editor and MBean palette.

The YouTube video WebLogic Server 12.2.1 - Developing with Eclipse provides a short demonstration on how to install Eclipse and the OEPE components using the new Network Installer that is bundled within the WebLogic Server installations.  It then shows the configuring of a new WebLogic Server 12.2.1 server target within Eclipse and finishes with importing a Maven project that contains a Java EE 7 example application that utilizes the new Batch API that is deployed to the server and called from a browser to run.

Wednesday Sep 03, 2014

Developing with Oracle WebLogic Server 12.1.3 - Whitepaper and Video

Accompanying the release of Oracle WebLogic Server 12.1.3 a whitepaper was published that describes the new developer oriented features that the product release contains. As this previous blog describes, it covers in some detail the new and updated Java EE APIs provided in the release:

  • Java API for WebSocket 1.0
  • Java API for JSON Processing 1.0
  • Java API for RESTful Web Services 2.0
  • Java Persistence API 2.1

It also discusses the general developer features of Oracle WebLogic Server, including the existing Java EE 6 support and some new additional capabilities such as the WebSocket Emulation library and a programming model for developing applications that use the ServerSent-Event feature of HTML5.

A video presentation covering all these new capabilities is also available on the YouTube/OracleWebLogic channel - describing the developer features of the product and how they offer support for building modern applications.

See it directly on YouTube @ Developing with Oracle WebLogic Server 12.1.3

Or check it out with the inline viewer below.

Tuesday Jan 22, 2013

The WebLogic 12c Book is Finally Here

WebLogic 12c Distinctive Recipes for software architects, administrators and developers -- who know quite a bit about WebLogic, want to know more, but don’t want the typical ‘recipe book’ full of screenshots. This new book is a collection of best practice in administrating WebLogic, large-scale deployments,  performance-tuning biggest mistakes and tools, the JVM, using JMX with your own applications, stuck threads, JDBC myths, effectively detecting memory leaks, Java EE examples (deployments and NetBeans projects), Oracle Fusion Middleware (Service Bus, SOA Suite etc.) and WebLogic in the Cloud without the hype. The book provides insights you won’t find in the manual, like recommendations, discussions, best practices, deployable projects, webcast videos and directions on when to use a feature – and when not to. With all this and more, this book is the perfect complement to official courses and manuals. Check it out on


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