Monday Feb 23, 2015

Sonatype Nexus 2.11.2 supports Oracle Maven Repository

The Sonatype team have announced the release of the Nexus 2.11.2 repository manager that now works with the Oracle Maven Repository.

With the new Nexus 2.11.2 release we are supporting the authentication mechanism used for the Oracle Maven repository in both Nexus OSS and Nexus Pro. This allows you to proxy the repository in Nexus and makes the components discoverable via browsing the index as well as searching for components. You will only need to set this up once in Nexus and all your projects. Developers and CI servers get access to the components and the need for any manual work disappears. On the Nexus side, the configuration changes can be done easily as part of your upgrade to the new release.

Check out their blog @ Using the Oracle Maven Repository with Nexus

Thursday Feb 19, 2015

Calling All WebLogic Users: Please Help Us Improve WebLogic Documentation!

Great documentation is key to the usability of any good product - WebLogic is most certainly not an exception. The WebLogic documentation team tries hard to do the best job they can. It's not a particularly easy job with a product as feature rich as WebLogic that has a continuous cadence of evolution.

The best way to make sure we have great documentation is getting feedback from you - the user. For this reason we are collecting feedback through an open survey on WebLogic documentation. The public survey is available here. The survey is just two pages, should take you a few minutes to fill out and will greatly help the WebLogic user community. Your opinion is worth it's weight in gold!

As a reminder, the latest WebLogic documentation is available here.

The survey is slated to close the end of February, but could be extended if there is a sustained stream of feedback.

Friday Feb 13, 2015

OpenWorld 2014 Round 3…Highlighting Oracle Java Cloud

by Ancy Dow, Oracle Tech Cloud Account Strategist

[I was wondering if I was the only one getting excited about these videos. So I asked my friend Ancy. She took a peak and not only did she like the videos, she wrote up this blog herself!]

In this session, Anand Kothari, Product Manager for Oracle Java Cloud Service and Oracle JaaS, and Harshad Oak, Oracle ACE Director, demonstrate how you can transform your development experience with Oracle’s Java Cloud. The ease and flexibility of developing in Java Cloud is unmatched, as customers can quickly build and deploy applications—be they existing Java applications, simple extensions to Oracle SaaS services, or new applications on-premise or in the cloud, using tools and techniques developers already use and love.

Oracle’s differentiating factor is that it is one of the only companies that has services across the stack—with the largest breadth of SaaS products—so it is a winning choice for customers who want a single vendor to be able to give them everything they want. Because of this, Oracle can go beyond just spinning up virtual machines, but rather, offer a first-class experience on Database, Java, or any service in the stack, abstracting these services so they are extremely simple to use in the Oracle cloud. Hybrid solutions are also possible, and workloads running in your private cloud can seamlessly be brought onto public and back because the same services are offered in both. And because it is cloud, this enterprise-grade technology comes with all the cloud economics, infinite scale, and capacity.

Currently, there are two Java Cloud Services available on cloud.oracle.com. The JCS SaaS Extension is purpose-built for you to build SaaS extensions to our Oracle SaaS services. Because it is abstracted, customers don’t have access to the infrastructure, but users interact with it much like any SaaS service, which means that there is no patching or backing up required.

Java Cloud Service is a full production environment built using our best practices at all tiers. At the web tier, at the app tier, at the database tier, everything was built so that you get a complete environment with one click that has been fully integrated by Oracle and is meant for production. Java Cloud Service itself is fully customizable, and comes with the complete app container so that customers can bring their applications without any code changes to the Oracle Cloud environment. Customers have access to the underlying infrastructure so they can customize applications to fit their needs, and because there is built-in high availability, you can have a multi-cluster, multi-node cluster on it. There is also a choice of versions, and it is similarly simple to the SaaS Extension service, with automated tooling around patching, backup, restore, and scalability, to make it extremely flexible and easy to create and maintain environments in the cloud.

For test and development use cases, customers may not need rollback capacity or certain features, so Oracle also created JCS Virtual Image, a highly simple environment to get started on. Oracle gives you the same SLA’s so you can put a production application on it, and because there’s less automation, it is more affordable, In Virtual Image, Oracle starts you off with a single VM for a simple use case. Mostly you'll do functional development on the Virtual Image, and then when you test clusterability and high availability, you use Java Cloud Services. Because tooling is not there, you still have underlying infrastructure access and can create clusters yourself, but that's the whole premise: an extremely simple environment optimized for test and dev.

There are many more capabilities about the Java Cloud Service suite that I can’t sum up in one blogpost, but check out the video of the session hosted here at http://bit.ly/oow14cafsessions to see the exciting demos themselves!


Wednesday Feb 11, 2015

Is your IT private PaaS ready? Take this 10-minute Assessment to find out

By the end of 2015, end-user spending on cloud services is expected to exceed $180 billion[1]. The shift toward cloud is undeniable, as is the need for hybrid cloud. Driven by legal, political, security, control, historical, cultural [add more reasons here] needs, organizations will continue to run some of their applications inside their firewall (in addition to running many of their applications on a public cloud), which will ultimately drive the need to create a private cloud infrastructure.

From the extensive insights we’ve compiled as leaders from our product and consulting teams have engaged with customers architecting their cloud infrastructure, we have developed an assessment for you to determine your IT organization’s private PaaS readiness. The tool comes with a 4-tiered dashboard based on the cloud adoption & maturity levels we’ve seen from hundreds of our customers, ranging from “preliminary” to “strategic.” Your organization’s current readiness rating is coupled with specific action items to help you reach the “strategic” level.

Take 10 minutes now to begin your private PaaS journey. Once you go through this assessment, you will receive a comprehensive 12-page report describing your PaaS adoption vis-a-vi your business strategy, governance, organization, integration and more. Not only that, we will compare your maturity with those of your peers, hundreds of whom have already taken the assessment, and include that comparison data in the report so you have a benchmark of your PaaS adoption readiness. Don’t get left behind. Take the assessment now!


[1] Gartner: http://www.informationweek.com/cloud/infrastructure-as-a-service/gartner-tells-outsourcers-embrace-cloud-or-die/d/d-id/1110991

Tuesday Feb 10, 2015

Oracle Maven Repository - Viewing Contents in Eclipse

Our own Steve Button has published a great blog on using the new Oracle Maven Repository with Eclipse.
Get started here, and then read the full entry.



With the Oracle Maven Repository now accessible one way to have explore its contents is to use the Maven Repositories viewer feature available in most development tools. I've seen the repository contents displayed easily in NetBeans so I decided to take a look at what it looks like in Eclipse as well.

I had to make a few minor setting changes to get it to work so decided to document them here.  If you've gotten it to work with less setting changes, let me know!

As initial setup, I configured my local maven environment to support access to the Oracle Maven Repository.  This is documented here https://maven.oracle.com/doc.html.  I also installed maven-3.2.5 that includes the updated Wagon module that supports authentication.

Next I downloaded and used the new network installer that the Oracle Eclipse team has published on OTN to install the latest version of Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse.



This network installer lets developers select the version of Eclipse to install and the set of Oracle extensions --  Weblogic, GlassFish and other stuff -- to add in to it.

 Once Eclipse is installed, you can add the Maven Repository viewer by selecting   Window > Show View > Other > Maven Repositories from the Eclipse toolbar.



I also added a Console > Maven viewer to see what was happening under the covers and arranged them so they were visible at the same time:


With the Maven views ready to go, expand the Global Repositories node. This will show Maven Central (any other repositories you may have configured) and the Oracle Maven Repository if you have configured it correctly in the settings.xml file.

The initial state of the Oracle Maven Repository doesn't show any contents indicating that its index hasn't been downloaded to display.

Right mouse clicking on it and selecting the Rebuild Index option causes an error to be shown in the console output indicating that the index could not be accessed.


To get it to work, I made the following changes to my environment.  

Configure Eclipse to Use Maven 3.2.5

Using the Eclipse > Preferences > Maven > Installation dialog, configure Eclipse to use Maven 3.2.5.  This is preferred version of Maven to use to access the Oracle Maven Repository since it automatically includes the necessary version of the Wagon HTTP module that supports the required authentication configuration and request flow.


Configure Proxy Settings in Maven Settings File

** If you don't need a proxy to access the Internet then step won't be needed **

If you sit behind a firewall and need to use a proxy server to access public repositories then you need to configure a proxy setting inside the maven settings file.

...Read the rest on Steve's blog!

Monday Feb 09, 2015

Reaching 10K

Today we reached the 10K mark in our twitter channel @OracleWebLogic. We are super excited with this focus and interest from our community. Our tweets earned over 40,000 impressions just over the last month, with about 2000 followers in the US, 1200 in India, and over 200 followers in Indonesia. We bring you news about WebLogic OpenWorld sessions before these are even approved [well almost], talk about the brand new Java Cloud Service & Developer Cloud Service, highlight developer focused projects such as improvements to our Maven repository, the Docker project, and focus on customer stories like those of 7-Eleven, The City of Las Vegas and many more.