Tuesday Jan 06, 2015

Applications User Experience shows off the Oracle 'cool factor' to the Oracle College Hire Program

By DJ Ursal, Oracle Applications User Experience

Ackshaey Singh (from left to right), DJ Ursal (@djursal), Misha Vaughan (@mishavaughan), Joe Goldberg, Noel Portugal (@noelportugal), and David Haimes (@dhaimes) prepare for the Oracle College Hire Morning Joe Panel, "Head in the Clouds." .

One of our charters as part of the Oracle Applications UX organization is to support the Oracle Product Development Boot Camps. The program components are career development, speaker series and social activities. The idea is to promote teamwork, collaboration and give college-hires a chance to work with different technologies within and outside of Oracle and explore their creativity. This was my first time supporting the Oracle Campus Hire (OCH) program as part of the Oracle Applications User Experience group. The Apps UX organization held two sessions: a "Head in the Clouds" panel and a mock Angel Investor event.

The OCH Morning Joe Panel, "Head in the Clouds" (styled after MSNBCs show of the same name), was a great discussion panel. The panel was facilitated by OCH member Ackshaey Singh (Senior Application Engineer) and included Misha Vaughan (Director User Experience, Apps UX Communications & Outreach), David Haimes (Senior Director, Financial Applications Development), Joe Goldberg (Chief Research Scientist, Applications UX), Noel Portugal (Development Manager, Emerging Technologies) and DJ Ursal (Director – Product management). We touched on how Oracle is aligning for the Applications Cloud wearable’s challenges we see with user experience, how beacons work and the opportunity for Oracle, cloud business models, and of course, advice to college hires.  

The afternoon included a mock Angel Investor event using our team’s OpenWorld demos. We held a raffle that encouraged participants to vote for the most interesting demo concept.

Angel Investor voting stations were set up for event attendees.  

The goal of the event for the new hires was to expose them to the breadth and depth of Oracle’s strategy and roadmap on Applications Cloud user experiences in a fun, interactive, and thought provoking way.  

Ackshaey Singh explains what new hires can learn about at the exchange.

The new hires were also given a tour of our new Cloud UX lab. The Cloud UX Lab initiative is to explore how devices are changing the way we design enterprise experiences for the cloud. The Lab model provides opportunities for testing a variety of emerging technology solutions from casting, to beacons, to wearables.

To learn more about where innovation is going at Oracle, check the following blogs:

Saturday Sep 27, 2014

Day of sharing UX Cloud strategy kicks off OpenWorld for us

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

For the Oracle Applications User Experience team, Oracle OpenWorld 2014 got off to an early start with an invitation-only Applications Cloud UX Strategy & Roadmap Day the week before OpenWorld kicked off. 

We gave partners, customers, and Oracle sales reps a first look at the Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) just ahead. About 40 participants had the chance to show, see, hear about, and discuss Oracle R&D efforts behind our upcoming cloud user experiences, including near-production design work and ongoing plans, at Oracle headquarters on Wednesday, Sept. 24. 

The audience included many dedicated OAUX Speakers, Oracle ACE Directors, strategic partners, and key Oracle sales reps and solution consultants who are part of the OAUX Sales Ambassador (SAMBA) program. Several of the participants had been trained already on the Oracle user experience and often speak at user group conferences or write about Oracle frequently.

Audience shot
Photos by Rob Hernandez, Oracle Applications User Experience

Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), vice president of the Oracle Applications User Experience, above, set the stage early for a day of sharing and outreach. As he gave an overview of the Oracle user experience strategy, he reminded the audience that a simplified user experience was first launched a year ago for the Applications Cloud at Oracle OpenWorld 2013. “We’re not just talking about what we’ve got anymore, we’re actually showing it,” he said. “When we talk about the roadmap, we have examples of products already released to show you what we mean. This is part of a cultural shift for Oracle – we’re responding more quickly to the market and our users' needs than ever before.” 

He added that what OpenWorld attendees see this year won’t be conceptual. “What you’ll see at OpenWorld is product or will be released soon,” he said. “We’re proud of what we have, and we’re showing it.” 

Questions from the audience centered on how all of Oracle’s applications products, such as HCM Cloud, Sales Cloud, Service Cloud, ERP Cloud, E-Business Suite and PeopleSoft, are integrating the simplified UI into current releases. The answer is that many updates have been released throughout the past year, and examples of user experience features are visible throughout the application suites. 

But the user experience team always wants to go beyond “when can we get this?”. An example that struck a chord with the audience repeatedly throughout the day was geo-fencing  – concepts around built-in security that is tied to wi-fi access and location. Is anyone else talking about this?, audience members asked. And then they added what we always love to hear: “This is cool.”

There were several breakout sessions throughout the day that highlighted new user experiences in the Oracle HCM Cloud, Oracle Sales Cloud, Oracle ERP Cloud, PaaS for Saas and extensibility, and the path to product for many user experience concepts. Visit the Usable Apps Events page to see where you can catch bits of these presentations at OpenWorld this year, or watch our channels (links are available on the Usable Apps website) for new content on the same topics. You can also check back with VoX on these topics – we’ll get something posted as soon as these user experience features are released.

The day ended with a showdown, followed by more cool demos (because that’s what we do best) provided by our own AppsLab (@theappslab), George Hackman, and Laurie Pattison. Our audience was game, and several stepped up to the front of the class to talk about what they had learned and why they had a passion for user experience. 

Gustavo Gonzalez (@ggonza4itc), from left, Oracle employee Ultan O’Broin (@usableapps), Sten Vesterli (@techthatfits), Floyd Teter (@fteter), Lonneke Dikmans (@lonnekedikmans), Debra Lilley (@debralilley), and Oracle employee Misha Vaughan (@mishavaughan) pose for a picture of the winners’ circle after a speaker showdown at the end of the OAUX Day. Ultan and Misha judged the competition. All were declared winners and received fabulous wearables hand-picked by the OAUX team. Floyd won the grand prize for including the OAUX design philosophy of “glance, scan, commit” in his presentation.

But in the end, all of the speakers were winners in our book, and everyone took something fun home.

Where can you find us next?

The OAUX team will be on the road in FY 15 (Oracle-speak for June 1, 2014 to May 31, 2015), visiting EMEA, LAD, and APAC.  We will have a specific focus on Oracle Applications Cloud partners, and a few of their key customers as follows:

  • Dec 4-5, 2014 - London.  Contact: Ishacq.Nada @ oracle.com 
  • Feb 25-26, 2015 - Sao Paulo, Brazil. Contact: Marcelo.Medeiros @ oracle.com
  • May 4-5, 2015 - Singapore & (tentatively) Hong Kong May 7, 2015.  Contact: John.Pisani @ oracle.com

In addition, we will be at usergroup conferences throughout the year - stay tuned to this blog for updates on that or check out our upcoming events page. 

Not enough for you? Join our quarterly call hosted by Michael LaDuke, michael.laduke @ oracle.com.

We look forward to meeting you in the year ahead!

Monday Aug 04, 2014

Applications User Experience Beacons Developer Challenge Promotes Innovation, Collaboration

By DJ Ursal, Oracle Applications User Experience

The entrepreneurial spirit came alive during the Oracle Applications User Experience (Apps UX) Beacons Developer Challenge recently. There was a true sense of collaboration, not only at the participant level but at an organizational level too. We saw a lot of creativity and pushed the boundaries of what’s possible with emerging technologies.

As host of the event, it was a wonderful opportunity to network with best-of-the-best minds within Oracle. We believe beacons are a game-changer in connectivity and the next big technology of the future. This functionality leverages Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) technology, allowing you to add geofencing capabilities to your application design. Instead of using satellite-based signals to track your users’ locations, highly localized BLE signals from a variety of signal emitters provide a more granular level of interaction with applications.

The Beacons Developer Challange was a 60-hour mobile app-building contest, held in July at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, Calif..The purpose of the Challenge was to give developers, designers, and internal entrepreneurs the chance to work together to build apps, bring awareness to “the Internet of things”, as well as to promote collaboration across Oracle. Participating organizations included: Fusion Technical Architecture, BlueKai Development, Siebel development,Oracle Internet of Things (IoT) Organization, North America Sales consulting group, Fusion HCM Development, Apps Usability and the Oracle Product Development College Hire Program.

North America Applications Sales Consulting team as they set out to conquer the developer challenge. 

Oracle Product Development College Hire team takes time out for brainstorming.

The challenge was focused on location-aware enterprise business scenarios, and teams chose their own platform on which to develop a mobile app. We limited this competition to one beacon platform, using iBeacons from Estimote, however others are available such as Gimbal and Raspberry Pi. We wanted to make sure that single-member teams had a fighting chance too, so there was no restriction on the size of the team. To ensure a level playing field, all participants were provided with the same set of sample data to be used for creating their mobile app. Each application was evaluated by judges based on the following criteria:
  • Execution of Entry: How fully developed and implemented the entry is. Does it use the data provided and beacons?
  • Business Value: How useful would the entry be in a business context?
  • User Experience: To what degree does the entry demonstrate new and innovative uses of beacons and Oracle data? Is it a pleasure to use?

Judges included Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), second from left, the vice president of the Oracle Applications User Experience team, Jayant Sharma, Director product management, and Mark Vilrokx (@mvolrokx). Not in the picture, Ed Jones, John Hsieh, Dj Ursal and Laurie Pattison.

After two and half days of hard work and coding, nine projects were demoed to our panel of judges at the end of the week. Great ideas were showcased, and choosing the top three proved to be difficult.

Awards and Certificates. 

The first place award went to a solo entry, team Swift, that showcased the power of a framework that was location-aware, using iBeacons. In second place, The AppsLab (@appslab) team implemented a location-aware, social application for the enterprise that connected local employees together to better manage their interactions in the workplace by sharing information, such as location. Team OCH1 came in third with their app that utilizes beacons to change the way we look for resources in the office.

The Apps UX Beacon Developer Challenge was sponsored by the Oracle Product Development College Hire Program, Oracle Facilities and Oracle Spatial and Graph. A big thank-you goes to our fantastic on-site support staff, which included people from across different organizations within Oracle.

The Apps UX Beacon Developer Challenge event staff.

At the end of the day, it was not about the prizes, but building passion for creating new ideas and concepts, new experiences, in a fun and engaging manner, and promoting an innovative social network that allows one to connect with like-minded people, crossing organizational boundaries.

The Oracle Apps UX developer challenge mission is to fuel innovation and promote collaboration by connecting people, ideas, and technologies from various organizations across Oracle. By collaborating in the developers challenge and working together, the employees got a chance to contribute  their best skills while learning from the other members of the team. Team members learnt from each other by sharing information, discussing options, debating the best solution, and by actively using skills on developer challenge project.

Friday Jun 27, 2014

More Wearables: A wearables design jam out-of-house with EchoUser and FATHOM

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

The Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) team hosted its first Wearables Design Jam with people outside of Oracle in May. Members of the team headed up to San Francisco for the event, which was held at EchoUser, a user experience (UX) design and consultancy firm and a collaborator on UX with Oracle. Ultan O’Broin (@usableapps), OAUX Director and partner outreach dynamo, was the host. This reprised event updated an earlier internal event, also the first of its kind here, on wearables. Our goal, as before, was to get design teams thinking about the enterprise use cases for wearable technology.

O’Broin shows off wearable ears.
Photos by Rob Hernandez.

Ultan said at the event: “The goals for the day were to build a relationship with a partner in the wearables and innovation space - to see if we could work together in a way that was mutually beneficial and to increase the awareness of users in this space. We are ahead of the curve and ready to offer optimal user experiences, and the technology is there. This is a pilot event because we want to do more of this. We want to work out the methodologies so we can take it on the road. I’d like to try this next in the UK, and in a culture that hasn’t been exposed to the wearable hype, and try it in countries that are very conscious of what goes on in the public and private sphere, like Germany, and try it in Asian countries as well.” 

Ultan said the event was great. “People entered into the spirit of openness, their own experiences, their own background - and they applied it in a fun and meaningful way," he said.

Ultan and Anthony Lai (@anthonyslai), of the TheAppslab team at Oracle (@theappslab), delivered a level-setting presentation on the state of the art for wearables, including examples of Google Glass. Attendees were from Oracle, EchoUser, and FATHOM, a 3D-printing company in the Bay Area.  

Veronica De La Rosa of FATHOM, Carol Chen of EchoUser and Aylin Uysal of Oracle develop on-boarding concepts that incorporate wearables.

Attendees then broke into teams of three and four to brainstorm on enterprise wearables concepts. They sketched, drew, debated, and produced an idea for an enterprise wearable use case in 2 hours. All teams delivered a 5-minute pitch at the end of the day to judges Mick McGee (@micklives), CEO, EchoUser; and Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), VP, Oracle Applications User Experience. Teams pitched employee on-boarding wearables, shipping delivery driver wearables, and retail worker wearables.

Mick McGee, EchoUser, and Jeremy Ashley, Oracle, discuss the design themes emerging around wearables.

Mick and Jeremy gave comments on the team presentations, which are recapped here: 

Mick: “There was a theme of people interaction and people connection, enabling our interaction with work colleagues. where you can actually get around the social stigma of using wearables to connect. I like the idea of interaction in different, small, productive ways. One thing that stuck out to me in talking to Jeremy was all the small gains in end user experiences – that will be the killer app.”  

Jeremy: “I agree with all of those points, especially the small gains. There are different cultures where being tracked is actually motivating, e.g., you being monitored while you are doing a safety check, so you want to be monitored. In another environment, you may not want to be tracked; the level and type of tracking needs to be different. I think understanding role by role where the comfort level is, is important.”  

Mick: “If you recall the iPhone days, that was only 7 years ago. There was a big platform change, from my perspective, all this investment going on, this next platform is right around the corner. Enterprise has more of a chance, to me, than consumer for this kind of technology because they make us work better. I’m excited to see where wearables goes.”

Jeremy:  “It’s exploring what is already in the environment, and leveraging what we might consider mundane tasks, and automating them. These are the small gains that we are going to get with this kind of technology. I like the idea of things happening around you -- rather than going to websites to onboard, giving a device – eyelashes, a ring, or whatever -- where they can have a personal on-boarding experience.”

Mick: “I see a lot of potential in these ideas to help the end-user consumer, especially to help reduce the social stigma associated with these technologies.” 

So which idea did the two execs think had the most enterprise merit?

Jeremy: "The Thought Box was the best solution. It would have a high impact using existing infrastructure, with off-the-shelf parts, and would greatly enhance the whole experience, and could viably be done now.  And it combines many small gains. That would be, overall, a big impact." 

The winning team, Thought Box: Kimra McPherson, EchoUser; Amaya Lascano, EchoUser; and David Haimes, Oracle. With Jeremy Ashley and Mick McGee in the background.

The Thought Box team pitched a wearable designed to be worn by a shipping delivery driver – such as a UPS or DHL driver. The wearable, such as a pair of sunglasses, would provide detailed information about the shipping delivery location such as:
Whether any hazards exist
Whether the recipient is home
Step-by-step directions to the location 
How to be more efficient in the delivery based on past experience
How to be safe, such as using a trolley when moving a heavy load up a steep grade
Sending alerts to the recipient when the driver is close
Taking a picture of the package at the drop location and sending it to the recipient
Even integrating construction details.

This device is aimed at making small efficiency gains that can scale across the whole business. 

The Thought Box concept and pitch sketches

The overall benefit of this wearable concept was aimed at making faster and more reliable deliveries to increase a driver’s rate of success. The related goal is also reducing customer calls, because of the real-time trouble-shooting.

My personal favorite wearable technology of the day: 
I personally was delighted by the idea of custom wearables designed by Team ConneXtion, and modeled by Aylin Uysal below.

Aylin models wearable eyelashes, intended to aid new hire on-boarding.

How do you find out more?
The Oracle Applications User Experience team is going to be going on the road in the year ahead.  If you want to chat with us about our experiences with wearable technologies, along with other technology we see on the horizon, feel free to find us at an upcoming event on UsableApps.  

If you will be at OOW 2014, so will the Apps UX team. Come find us!

Wednesday Jun 11, 2014

So, how is the Oracle HCM Cloud User Experience? In a word, smokin’!

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

Oracle unveiled its game-changing cloud user experience strategy at Oracle OpenWorld 2013 (remember that?) with a new simplified user interface (UI) paradigm.  The Oracle HCM cloud user experience is about light-weight interaction, tailored to the task you are trying to accomplish, on the device you are comfortable working with. A key theme for the Oracle user experience is being able to move from smartphone to tablet to desktop, with all of your data in the cloud.

The Oracle HCM Cloud user experience provides designs for better productivity, no matter when and how your employees need to work.

Release 8 
Oracle recently demonstrated how fast it is moving development forward for our cloud applications, with the availability of release 8

In release 8, users will see expanded simplicity in the HCM cloud user experience, such as filling out a time card and succession planning. Oracle has also expanded its mobile capabilities with task flows for payslips, managing absences, and advanced analytics. In addition, users will see expanded extensibility with the new structures editor for simplified pages, and the with the user interface text editor, which allows you to update language throughout the UI from one place. If you don’t like calling people who work for you “employees,” you can use this tool to create a term that is suited to your business. 

Take a look yourself at what’s available now.

What are people saying?
Debra Lilley (@debralilley), an Oracle ACE Director who has a long history with Oracle Applications, recently gave her perspective on release 8:

“Having had the privilege of seeing a preview of release 8, I am again impressed with the enhancements around simplified UI. Even more so, at a user group event in London this week, an existing Cloud HCM customer speaking publically about his implementation said he was very excited about release 8 as the absence functionality was so superior and simple to use.” 

In an interview with Lilley for a blog post by Dennis Howlett  (@dahowlett), we probably couldn’t have asked for a more even-handed look at the Oracle Applications Cloud and the impact of user experience. Take the time to watch all three videos and get the full picture.  In closing, Howlett’s said: “There is always the caveat that getting from the past to Fusion [from the editor: Fusion is now called the Oracle Applications Cloud] is not quite as simple as may be painted, but the outcomes are much better than anticipated in large measure because the user experience is so much better than what went before.”

Herman Slange, Technical Manager with Oracle Applications partner Profource, agrees with that comment. “We use on-premise Financials & HCM for internal use. Having a simple user interface that works on a desktop as well as a tablet for (very) non-technical users is a big relief. Coming from E-Business Suite, there is less training (none) required to access HCM content.  From a technical point of view, having the abilities to tailor the simplified UI very easy makes it very efficient for us to adjust to specific customer needs.  When we have a conversation about simplified UI, we just hand over a tablet and ask the customer to just use it. No training and no explanation required.”

Finally, in a story by Computer Weekly  about Oracle customer BG Group, a natural gas exploration and production company based in the UK and with a presence in 20 countries, the author states: “The new HR platform has proved to be easier and more intuitive for HR staff to use than the previous SAP-based technology.”

What’s Next for Oracle’s Applications Cloud User Experiences?
This is the question that Steve Miranda, Oracle Executive Vice President, Applications Development, asks the Applications User Experience team, and we’ve been hard at work for some time now on “what’s next.”  I can’t say too much about it, but I can tell you that we’ve started talking to customers and partners, under non-disclosure agreements, about user experience concepts that we are working on in order to get their feedback.

We recently had a chance to talk about possibilities for the Oracle HCM Cloud user experience at an Oracle HCM Southern California Customer Success Summit. This was a fantastic event, hosted by Shane Bliss and Vance Morossi of the Oracle Client Success Team. We got to use the uber-slick facilities of Allergan, our hosts (of Botox fame), headquartered in Irvine, Calif., with a presence in more than 100 countries.

Photo by Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience
Vance Morossi, left, and Shane Bliss, of the Oracle Client Success Team, at an Oracle HCM Southern California Customer Success Summit. 

We were treated to a few really excellent talks around human resources (HR). Alice White, VP Human Resources, discussed Allergan's process for global talent acquisition -- how Allergan has designed and deployed a global process, and global tools, along with Oracle and Cognizant, and are now at the end of a global implementation. She shared a couple of insights about the journey for Allergan: “One of the major areas for improvement was on role clarification within the company.” She said the company is “empowering managers and deputizing them as recruiters. Now it is a global process that is nimble and efficient." 

Deepak Rammohan, VP Product Management, HCM Cloud, Oracle, also took the stage to talk about pioneering modern HR. He reflected modern HR problems of getting the right data about the workforce, the importance of getting the right talent as a key strategic initiative, and other workforce insights. "How do we design systems to deal with all of this?” he asked. “Make sure the systems are talent-centric. The next piece is collaborative, engaging, and mobile. A lot of this is influenced by what users see today. The last thing is around insight; insight at the point of decision-making." Rammohan showed off some killer HCM Cloud talent demos focused on simplicity and mobility that his team has been cooking up, and closed with a great line about the nature of modern recruiting: "Recruiting is a team sport."

Deepak Rammohan, left, and Jake Kuramoto, both of Oracle, debate the merits of a Google Glass concept demo for recruiters on-the-go.

Later, in an expo-style format, the Apps UX team showed several concepts for next-generation HCM Cloud user experiences, including demos shown by Jake Kuramoto (@jkuramot) of The AppsLab, and Aylin Uysal (@aylinuysal), Director, HCM Cloud user experience. We even hauled out our eye-tracker, a research tool used to show where the eye is looking at a particular screen, thanks to teammate Michael LaDuke.

Dionne Healy, HCM Client Executive, and Aylin Uysal, Director, HCM Cloud user experiences, Oracle, take a look at new HCM Cloud UX concepts.

We closed the day with Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), VP, Applications User Experience, who brought it all back together by talking about the big picture for applications cloud user experiences. He covered the trends we are paying attention to now, what users will be expecting of their modern enterprise apps, and what Oracle’s design strategy is around these ideas.  

We closed with an excellent reception hosted by ADP Payroll services at Bistango.

Want to read more?
Want to see where our cloud user experience is going next? Read more on the UsableApps web site about our latest design initiative: “Glance, Scan, Commit.”

Or catch up on the back story by looking over our Applications Cloud user experience content on the UsableApps web site. 

You can also find out where we’ll be next at the Events page on UsableApps.

Friday May 02, 2014

Thank you, Oracle Partner AMIS, for an excellent Oracle Applications Cloud User Experience Expo

Author Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

We recently co-hosted an OAUX Expo in Nieuwegein, The Netherlands (near Amsterdam) on March 18, 2014 with Oracle partner AMIS. The goal of the event was to excite and inspire attendees about the future of Oracle technology and Oracle Applications Cloud by leading with our work on the Oracle user experiences.  We wildly exceeded my own expectations about the event. Students walked away excited about careers with Oracle technology, partners walked away with a sense of how they could grow their businesses, and customers walked away with confidence in Oracle’s UX investment strategy.

The timing was quite lucky, as this was the first event where attendees got to see the newly available Oracle Applications Cloud Release 8 user interface.

A personal thank-you to Lucas Jellema, Amis CTO, who was enthusiastic and inspired enough to spark this project.

To get a recap of what you missed, AMIS CTO Lucas Jellema (@lucasjellema) blogged live about the event, which drew nearly 500 attendees. Just prior to the event, Bob Rhubart (@OTNArchBeat) of OTN Archbeat hosted a video
interview that previewed the event nicely, with Lucas and our VP, Applications User Experience, Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), on the Oracle user experience vision and strategy.

What did you miss?

Here is a recap in pictures of the event. Photos by Rob Hernandez, Oracle Applications User Experience. 

The Oracle Applications User Experience and AMIS teams pose just before the big day for a snapshot.

Ultan O’Broin talks about wearables and enterprise use cases.

Aylin Uysal discusses the future of Oracle HCM Cloud user experiences.

VP Jeremy Ashley and Amis CEO Paul Uijtewaal discuss Google Glass.

 Lonneke Dikmans listens poised to talk about UX Direct and Oracle’s UX best practices. 

Killian Evers leads a discussion about the next generation of the Sales Cloud user experience.

Vlad Babu, one of our Apps UX Sales Ambassadors, talks with attendees about UX Direct and UX design patterns for building great looking usable apps for the Cloud.

A few lucky attendees got to see what’s behind the door to the secret chamber.

Noel Portugal shows off Google Glass.

George Hackman demos forward-looking user experience concepts.

Jeremy Ashley, Lucas Jellema, and Sten Vesterli rest their weary legs after hours of presentations.

One of our own UX Sales Ambassadors, Edward DeWolf, demos the new simplified UI for Oracle Sales Cloud.

Jake Kuramoto draws observers into a huddle as he shows some user experience concepts.

Find out where the UX team will be next if you want to see what we are working on

If you would like to read more:

• Take a look at where it all started.

• Read the latest on our cloud tailoring strategy.

Sunday Mar 16, 2014

Wearables Design Jam @ Oracle Applications User Experience Labs

By Misha Vaughan (@mishavaughan), Oracle Applications User Experience

The conversation about new technology and what it means for enterprise users keeps moving forward at Oracle. The latest version of that conversation was an inspirational event at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, California, on Feb. 4: a Wearables Design Jam led by Ultan O’Broin, Director, Oracle Applications User Experiences.

Ultan and Sarahi
Photo by Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience
Ultan O’Broin prepares, with his usual style, alongside Sarahi Mireles, for the wearables design jam

The goal of the event was to discuss wearables in the work world, solve an enterprise problem, and have fun. What was different about this event was that there was no coding required – it was a pen-and-paper, creative project.

Participants came from a variety of Oracle teams to share ideas – and compete - such as User Assistance, JD Edwards, the Apps Lab, Enterprise Performance Management, and the Mexico Development Center UX team.

Ultan kicked off the event with an introduction to wearables by calling them smart personal technology devices, worn or carried all the time. “It's about automating and augmenting activities,” he said. “Automating the things you hate, and augmenting the things you love. Using technologies you already know – cameras, watches – with new capabilities – GPS, optical character recognition to perform tasks hands-free, and see or easily capture information.  For us, these experiences are apps that are integrated with data in the cloud.” 

He discussed several consumer examples including Samsung Galaxy Gear watch, Oakley Airwave, Google Glass, and Fitbit Force.  "Right now, it's consumer driven usage, dominated by health and personal fitness,” Ultan said. “These expectations from the personal world will affect user expectations of the enterprise."  Examples in the enterprise space include the Hitachi business microscope. An example closer to home is the use of the Fitbit at Oracle HCM World. Attendees were given Fitbit wrist bands and encouraged to log their steps against other attendees in a fitness campaign.

Wellness leaderboard
The HCM World Wellness leaderboard counts the steps of attendees.

For the participants of our Wearables Design Jam, the challenge was to design enterprise solutions – their own wearables use cases – working in teams of three and four. With only paper, pencils, and wearables stencils, participants brainstormed ideas for wearables that could be useful in an enterprise context.

This is an example of a stencil from the Wearables Design Jam.

Teams presented their designs to judge Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), Vice President, Oracle Applications User Experiences. Ideas ranged from smart employee ID badges to gloves to warehouse technology, to OpenWorld conference technology. The winning team presented a smarter OpenWorld badge that collects, shares, and exchanges contact information with attendees.

The winning team
The winning team: Adam Heller, Principal Usability Engineer; Bo Wang, Senior Interaction Designer; and Gurbinder Bali, Director, JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Development.

Ashley said, "The key to wearables is a casual gesture. But you can go even further. Imagine you had warehouse management that took advantage of whoever was nearest, to make it more engaging or using specialists with skills."  He said the winning idea has implicit participation and is immediately available, and it also has immediate analytic capability and integration with Sales Cloud and HCM Cloud.

For more information on wearable computing, check out these related posts:
•    The AppsLab team participates in a recent AT&T developer hackathon in the Wearables track (@appslab).
•    Ultan explores the reactions to Google Glass globally.
•    Marta Rauch takes an awesome ride down Highway 84 through the eyes of Google Glass (@marta).

Saturday Mar 01, 2014

OAUX Expo: Oracle & AMIS bring new Applications Cloud user experiences to Europe on March 18th

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

Lucas Jellema
Photo by Martin Taylor, Oracle Applications User Experience
Lucas Jellema, Chief Technology Officer of Oracle partner AMIS Services BV, gets a look at new Oracle user experiences during a demo with Lulit Bezuayahu, of Oracle, at an OAUX Expo at OpenWorld 2013. The expo was his source of inspiration for an expo in The Netherlands in March 2014.

Lucas Jellema, Chief Technology Officer of Oracle partner AMIS Services BV, first saw the Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) Expo at OpenWorld in September 2013 in San Francisco.

“The expo further enforced the message - simplicity, mobility, extensibility - and what that boils down to in terms of actual user interfaces,” Jellema said after the expo. “It also strengthened my confidence in what the UX team is doing. It helps me believe that Oracle actually can be a leader in UX in the enterprise space.”  He said he recognized the excitement and possibilities for inspiration for Oracle customers and asked if the UX team could bring the same experience to Europe in partnership with AMIS.

Join us on March 18 at the AMIS offices in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The Oracle Applications User Experience team will be showcasing the latest thinking in Oracle’s user experiences from noon to 8pm,  along with talks by speakers including Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), Vice President, Applications User Experiences; Sten Vesterli  (@techthatfits), Senior Principal Consultant, Scott / Tiger; Lonneke Dikmans, (@lonnekedikmans), Managing Parter, Vennster; and, of course, Lucas Jellema (@lucasjellema).

The event will be open to the public, including students, customers, and partners.  Registration is necessary to make sure we can accommodate everyone.    

Attendees can expect to see the latest in Oracle’s thinking on Oracle Applications Cloud user experiences, meet the creative AppsLab development team (@theappslab) try out Oracle’s eye-tracking usability research tool, and participate in talks ranging from wearable technology (@ultan) to Oracle Application Development Framework (ADF) to Oracle Apex by a slate of Oracle and AMIS experts.  There even may be a Tesla user experience on display.

By special request of the AMIS team, Oracle will also host a Secret Chamber that requires customers to be under non-disclosure. Behind these doors, customers will be able to see Oracle’s applications cloud user experience roadmap.

OAUX Expo sign
Photo by Misha Vaughan

We hope to see you there! Please remember to register in advance to ensure your access!
More information is available on the Usable Apps web site.

Thursday Feb 20, 2014

New Oracle developers get a taste of Raspberry Pi

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

There is a team within the Oracle Applications User Experience (UX) group that basically plays with interesting technology. We call them the AppsLab (@theappslab). That technology may include fuzzy ears  (@ultan) that interact with your brain waves, robot arms, or Google Glass.

Recently, it included Raspberry Pi. And a day of hacking.

My team -- the Communications & Outreach arm of the Applications UX group -- sometimes works closely with this team. My boss has her own set of fuzzy ears. I’ve tried out the robot arms (I totally suck at moving them). And recently, I was introduced to Raspberry Pi.

Now, I’m a word person – if this small computer had been named anything else, my eyes might have glazed over. But the chance to tell folks about the creative ways that Oracle investigates and explores technology that can evolve the Oracle user experience … well, I’m much better at doing that. Especially if I’ve got a visual place from which to start the story.

Raspberry Pi
Raspberry Pi in use during the Oracle Apps UX hackday
Photos by Rob Hernandez

Raspberry Pi, above, is actually an inexpensive computer that was originally made for kids. It was intended to give kids a device that would help them learn how to program computers. (Neat story there from the U.K. creators.)

Noel Portugal (@noelportugal), the developer who led the January training and hackday, said the credit-card-sized computer can do anything that a Linux computer can do. It’s easy to hook up and, because it costs about $35, easy to replace. So it’s a perfect starting point for kids, and it has an Oracle connection: Oracle’s Java evangelists worked with the Raspberry Pi creators directly to make sure Java runs natively on the device.

Noel’s one-day event included about 15 developers who also work for the Oracle Applications User Experience team. Many were from Oracle’s Mexico Development Center; others came from the Denver area or the Northwest. AppsLab talking head Jake Kuramoto said the idea was to provide a shortcut to the technology and tap into Noel’s experience with it, then get everyone up and running on it. The day was a way to investigate something new in a collaborative session.

Noel Portugal
Noel Portugal, center, hands out mini computers during the Raspberry Pi hackathon.

This hackathon took place at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, inside the Oracle usability labs. By the end of the day, I was hearing random, sometimes crazy noises as network hook-ups took hold and programming began.

Our developers were using the Raspberry Pi with their laptops and smart phones to create sounds, issue commands, and send signals through various devices. Noel said the maker community uses Raspberry Pi to control robotics, control a server, switch lights and off, and connect sensors, among other things.

Here’s a look at our developers at work.

Fernando Jimenez shows off his button thing that was hooked up to Raspberry Pi and now plays Pandora.

Sarahi Mireles
Sarahi Mireles (@sarahimireles), center, makes something happen on Twitter with Raspberry Pi, and all the guys cheer.

Luis Galeana
I don’t know what developer Luis Galeana is doing, but you can tell it’s a big deal. Notice that he had to fuel up with a Snickers midway through.

OK, so some of this stuff was over my head. But it was fun to watch really focused, talented people do something they thought was fun. The creative bursts that come through while investigating and exploring are motivational. Technology, in any form, is fascinating. When applied to everyday objects in ways that evolve the user experience – it’s like watching science fiction unfold. But on the Oracle Applications User Experience team, it’s real.

The Applications UX team’s mission is to design and build “cool stuff,” as Jake puts it. Team members look at all kinds of technologies, because we know through research that this is what our users are also doing.

Stay tuned to VoX to learn more about the new, interesting, and creative ways we are evolving the user experience of enterprise software with similar methods of exploration. Be the first to see what’s coming!

Monday Dec 09, 2013

Partner Gives a Thumbs-Up to Insight on Oracle User Experience

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

Anne Meyer
Anne Meyer of MIPRO Consulting LLC, center, listens along with Kelly Bernie, Senior Manager, Oracle Applications Partner Enablement, left, to a demo from Ivy Leung, Applications User Experience, as she talks about Simplified UI for Oracle HCM Cloud at the OAUX Expo during OpenWorld in San Francisco in September 2013.

In the past 6 months, the Oracle Applications User Experience team has been experimenting with a new way to show the innovative user experiences we are building. This idea of a demo showcase evolved into the OAUX Expo at OpenWorld 2013, in September in San Francisco. Guests, who were required to sign non-disclosure agreements with Oracle and refrain from blogging, Tweeting, or other social media expressions about what they saw, were invited to attend an exclusive reception where they could see demos of just-released and future user experiences. These demos included everything from Simplified UI for the Sales Cloud and HCM Cloud to cutting-edge technology like voice and Google Glass that members of our team are exploring as we consider how to incorporate such technology into future user experiences.

Anne Meyer, representing Oracle partner MIPRO Consulting, was one of about 150 attendees. Here’s what she had to say about the expo and its value:

Q: What were you expecting to see at the OAUX Expo at Oracle OpenWorld 2013?

“I wasn’t sure what the format or content would be other than expecting a view of Fusion Release 7.” (Oracle Fusion Applications Cloud Services Release 7)

Q: How did the demos you saw meet your expectations?

Anne: “The demos surpassed my expectations. I have worked with OAUX in the past for one-on-one feedback sessions and have always enjoyed participating in those. In this forum, it was nice to walk up to and see and hear about a variety of innovative prototypes as well as upcoming new features soon to be available in the Oracle product lines.

The innovation of the prototypes was truly exciting. I’m anxious for these products to make it to the marketplace.  Some may be game-changing for Oracle, and how people view Oracle products. They demonstrated a great sense of what the new workforce generation is expecting in the software solutions they use at work. I was particularly excited about the voice recognition prototype. There are endless applications for that capability across the Oracle product lines.”

Q: Would you attend future OAUX Expo events, or bring colleagues to such an event?

Anne: “Absolutely. I always try and expand my company’s participation in OAUX events.”  

Q: How was the OAUX Expo valuable to you and your company?

Anne: "The OAUX Expo was important on many levels.  First, we are implementing Fusion Release 5, so the view into Release 7 was important in our planning for when we upgrade next year.  Second, as I noted in a previous comment, to see the innovation is very exciting to us as we are an organization focused on PeopleSoft and Fusion. It supports our enthusiasm for the products and their future, and how we can infuse that enthusiasm to our clients and prospects.”

Q: Has the OAUX Expo changed your perception of the Oracle user experience?

“I don’t know if it changes my perception per se, because I enjoy participating in the one-on-one feedback sessions. This is just another approach, and a good one, to see more at one time.”

Anne said in a separate email that the expo demonstrated how Oracle is moving forward with technology innovation. “I’ve been a participant in individual user experience sessions, but to put them all together in one room was eye-opening to how there is an overall vision, to where the Oracle products are moving. So having multiple stations to view the innovations gives one a full view, and an exciting one, to the future.” 

She added that the one thing that stood out was the voice recognition technology. “All of my customers and prospects are excited about the mobile technology, but little do they know that the voice recognition technology is potentially on its way. That is very, very exciting. We have customers who have people using PeopleSoft on things like oil rigs. How much more convenient could it be to a foreman to be able to audible rather than type things into PeopleSoft than that?

“The example used was CRM, but I think the real bottom-line usage of voice recognition is, for example, when a nurse on a hospital floor can audible inventory items and not take valuable time to key that in. That’s powerful. That’s ROI as hospitals look to reduce cost to patient days.  That was the most impressive application I saw there.”

Thank you, Anne, for your time and feedback! For more information on how to attend a similar expo event, contact Misha.Vaughan @ Oracle.com.

Monday Dec 02, 2013

Learn more about Simplified UI for Oracle HCM Cloud Applications, new in Release 7

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

Aylin Uysal
Photo by Anne-Marie McReynolds, Oracle Applications User Experience
Aylin Uysal, Oracle, shows the new Simplified UI for HCM users during a special show-and-tell event, before it was generally available in September 2013.

Simplified UI represents the direction that the Oracle user experience is heading for all of its cloud applications.

In September 2013, Release 7 for Oracle Cloud Applications became generally available for Oracle Sales Cloud and Oracle Human Capital Management (HCM) Cloud. This is a significant release for the Oracle Applications User Experience team, and it represents Oracle’s strategy for cloud applications user experiences along the lines of simplicity, mobility, and extensibility.

In Release 7, there’s a particular focus on HCM users, especially self-service users and managers, said Jeremy Ashley, Vice president of the Oracle Applications User Experience group. These users may be knowledge or information workers. They may also be users who don’t use enterprise applications all day – they may be asked to participate in using an HCM application to fill out information so that they can get paid, but it’s not what they do on a daily basis, Ashley said. They could be physical engineers, or production line workers who don’t even use laptops nor have e-mail, but they are all still expected to participate in the HCM system that their company provides.

Providing a consistent user experience for all of these users that doesn’t require weeks of training to navigate a hefty menu was the goal for the Simplified UI for HCM user experience. “If they have to go through four layers to get to the system, they have to be trained,” Ashley said. “So, we have looked to simplify standard employee tasks. Regardless of whether you’re a line worker or an executive, these standard tasks should be easy to do.”

The Simplified UI for HCM focuses on many self-service tasks that every employee needs to do – changing a phone number, checking a pay stub, looking up a co-worker’s information, or managing personal work goals on the company system.

HCM Cloud UI
Team performance in the new Oracle HCM Cloud.

But the full strength of Oracle’s Cloud Applications is always a click or two away, because Oracle recognizes that someone like the vice president of HR in the company also needs professional-strength applications. Simplified UI helps provide both balance and a gateway, because to think that all levels of HR employees can go through one UI is ridiculous, Ashley said. The UI would be either too simple or too difficult.

The Simplified UI for HCM appeals to these many levels of HR participation. All users should be able to approach it and understand it the first time they see it, no matter their comfort level with the deeper Fusion Applications that sit behind the Simplified UI.

The Oracle user experience also includes opportunities to tailor settings for all employees or implement a company brand, in just a few clicks, which provides easy customization to the Simplified UI for HCM Cloud.

Where can you find out more?

To find out more about the simplified UI and Oracle’s ongoing investment in applications user experience innovations, come to one of our sessions at a user group conference near you.

To get a quick view of what the new user expeirence is about, watch these videos on the HCM Cloud Simplified UI for employees and managers.

Thursday Nov 21, 2013

Will You Be Wearing Your Enterprise Application Data?

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

The Oracle Applications User Experience group has begun to explore the role of wearable computing and enterprise use cases, which is part and parcel of our charter to watch for future trends that will matter to our customers’ workforce.  See, for example, some of the recent posts by The AppsLab team and Ultan (@ultan) on wearables.

Heads-Up Displays: Google Glass

Anthony Lai (@anthonyslai), a User Experience Architect at Oracle, has been roaming the halls of Oracle with what are now easily identifiable as Google Glass.  In this post, he talks about his experience using Google Glass and what he has learned about wearing them in an enterprise setting.

Anthony Lai
Anthony Lai
Photo by Misha Vaughan

Q:  Let's start with the basics. What is Google Glass, and what is the vision behind the technology?

A: Glass is a device that is supposed to be non-intrusive, to give you information when you need it.  It is a way for you to quickly know about stuff right away, without even opening up a tablet or device.  It provides notifications to you for things you are interested in.  It provides you with navigation.  You can ask questions in a free-form format.  You can take pictures and do video recording for memories.  Quick snapshots. The photos are nice; they are wide-angle.  

Q: Do people around you find it intrusive at all?  Do they object to the video-recording capacity?

A: If you take a picture, you hear the click sound and there is a flash.  It’s not like you don't know it's happening. That brings in a paradigm about glass.  They position it just above the eye. You need the eye contact to create trust.

Q:  What have you found to be useful for yourself, in terms of work?

The first thing is that I subscribe to things I'm interested in on Twitter.  In Twitter, you can have a lot of people you are following.  You can select which people you want to receive on your Glass.  I put some technology things on there, and Glass would notify me.  I feel like it's really annoying now to go to my phone or my desktop. With Glass, it's just instant. That's key for me.

The other side is in-car navigation.  I was using my phone, but with Glass, I can see straight ahead and get the directions in my ear.  If it is time for you to turn and take actions, it will tell you.  So it's not really distracting you from driving.

Q:  As a developer working for Oracle, what enterprise use cases occur to you?

Take a CRM use case. What does a sales rep need to do when they go into a sales meeting?  What information do they need to know wherever they are?  One example is if there is a sales meeting coming up at 3 p.m., Google Glass can remind you, and then give you quick information, like attendees.  If you want to call an attendee right away, you can.  If you need to make a quick note, if you need to find where the meeting is, how bad traffic is to get there.  

During a meeting, we thought, what if you want to take a picture of the attendees so you don't forget who was at a meeting?  

At the end of the meeting, you may want to debrief.  You go to a coffee shop around the corner, where you can sit and make notes of the meeting with co-workers. You can even run a Google Hangout, or video-conference, with people who are there and not there.

Q: Final thoughts?

It's amazing technology.  I think it is an appropriate technology to move into the future.  I think there are a lot of people right now that are skeptical.  Right now, it is expensive.  Ultimately, the price will go down.  

Wearables: An Executive Perspective

Jeremy Ashley
Jeremy Ashley, Vice President of the Oracle Applications User Experience team, with his Pebble Watch.

"It's not just about Google Glass,” says Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), Vice President of Oracle Applications User Experience. “What we are doing is taking the application of computing power here, and moving away from it being a single device. We are moving to multiple devices that sense the world around you. It's really a matter of what these other devices can provide for you.”

Ashley said users are demanding smaller snippets of more detailed information, like Google Now and Windows tiles. “Instead of providing this large dashboard with this information all over it, you will see little tiles with snippets of information that you can drill on. It's no longer about providing lots of detailed information. It's providing lots of detailed information with context.”

The platforms for information delivery include glasses, watches, and other types of devices. The glasses derive their context from where you are, what you are looking at, and what you are supposed to be doing at that time. They use sight, sound, GPS, motion, direction, gesture and more.

Glasses are piggybacking on a set of interactions that you are already doing, and adding extra information on top of that, as opposed to a computer that you have to walk up to and begin providing context to. Glass augments a lot of your movements to gain input and complete a particular task.

Google Glass is an obvious use case for supply chain, Ashley said, when the user needs a third hand to reference material or communicate with someone about a part or a checklist. It can be recording what you are doing, or provide a channel for another technician to look over your shoulder as you check your work.

More use cases

Wearing Google Glass in meetings might also make sense. The user could be acting as a proxy who is sitting in the room for someone else and providing a feel of the room. 

In the financials spectrum, a user might want to keep information secret as opposed to making information public. Google Glass could be used by a CFO, who receives real-time data as opposed to opening up a laptop in a public place.

“When they say ‘augmentation,’ people think of Borg-like things on your head,” Ashley said. “Instead it’s about taking something that you already have, and just increasing the sensitivity to make it more meaningful or useful.”

As our data moves to the cloud, these kinds of experiences become more possible.

Monday Nov 11, 2013

Moving the Oracle User Experience Forward with the New Release 7 Simplified UI for Oracle Sales Cloud

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

In September 2013, Release 7 for Oracle Cloud Applications became generally available for Oracle Sales Cloud and HCM Cloud. This significant release allowed the Oracle Applications User Experience (UX) team to finally talk freely about Simplified UI, a user experience project in the works since Oracle OpenWorld 2012.

Simplified UI represents the direction that the Oracle user experience – for all of its enterprise applications – is heading.

Oracle’s Apps UX team began by building a Simplified UI for sales representatives. You can find that today in Release 7, and it was demoed extensively during OpenWorld 2013 in San Francisco.

See the the new Simplified UI for Oracle Sales Cloud, a user interface built for sales reps.

Analyst Rebecca Wettemann, vice president of Nucleus Research, saw Simplified UI at Oracle Openworld 2013 and talked about it with CRM Buyer in “Oracle Revs Its Cloud Engines for a Better Customer Experience.

CRM Buyer
Wettemann said there are distinct themes to the latest release:
"One is usability. Oracle Sales Cloud, for example, is designed to have zero training for onboarding sales reps, which it does," she explained. "It is quite impressive, actually -- the intuitive nature of the application and the design work they have done with this goal in mind."

The software uses as few buttons and fields as possible, she pointed out. "The sales rep doesn't have to ask, 'what is the next step?' because she can see what it is."

In fact, there are three themes driving the usability that Wettemann noted. They are simplicity, mobility, and extensibility, and we write more about them on the Usable Apps web site. These three themes embody the strategy for Oracle’s cloud applications user experiences.  

Simplified UI for Oracle Sales Cloud

In developing a Simplified UI for Oracle Sales Cloud, Oracle’s UX team concentrated on the tasks that sales reps need to do most frequently, and are most important. “Knowing that the majority of their work lives are spent on the road and on the go, they need to be able to quickly get in and qualify and convert their leads, monitor and progress their opportunities, update their customer and contact information, and manage their schedule,” Jeremy Ashley, Vice President of the Applications UX team, said.

Ashley said the Apps UX team has a good reason for creating a Simplified UI that focuses on self-service. “Sales people spend the day selling stuff,” he said. “The only reason they use software is because the company wants to track what they’re doing.” Traditional systems of tracking that information include filling in a spreadsheet of leads or sales. Oracle wants to automate this process for the salesperson, and enable that person to keep everyone who needs to know up-to-date easily and quickly. Simplified UI addresses that problem by providing light-touch input.  

“It has to be useful to the salesperson,” Ashley said about the Sales Cloud user experience. Simplified UI can tell sales reps about key opportunities, or provide information about a contact in just a click or two.

Customer screen shot
Customer information is accessible quickly and easily with Simplified UI for the Oracle Sales Cloud.

Simplified UI for Sales Cloud can also be extended easily, Ashley said. Users usually just need to add various business fields or create and modify analytical reports. The way that Simplified UI is constructed allows extensibility to happen by hiding or showing a few necessary fields.

The Settings user interface, starting in release 7, allows for the simple configuration of the most important visual elements.

“With Sales cloud, we identified a need to make the application useful and very simple,” Ashley said. Simplified UI meets that need.

Where can you find out more?
To find out more about the simplified UI and Oracle’s ongoing investment in applications user experience innovations, come to one of our sessions at a user group conference near you. Stay tuned to the Voice of User Experience (VoX) blog – the next post will be about Simplified UI and HCM Cloud.

Wednesday Oct 09, 2013

Meet the Apps UX team at UKOUG Apps13 in London, UK, in October

By Gozel Aamoth, Oracle Applications User Experience

This year, the UK Oracle User Group (UKOUG) has created separate conferences for the applications and technology communities. UKOUG Apps13 is the must-attend event for users of Oracle Applications in the United Kingdom.

The Oracle Applications User Experience team is preparing to hit the road in the next few weeks and fly from Oracle headquarters to the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. We will be at UKOUG Apps13 in London, UK, from October 14-16.

Onsite Usability Lab: Get involved, and give us your feedback
Our team has been hosting an onsite usability lab at the UKOUG conference in Birmingham, UK, since 2007. We are extremely excited about the conference changes and looking forward to collaborating with Oracle applications users and experts. Oracle customers and partners who plan to attend this conference or who are local to the London area are invited to participate in a usability feedback session. By participating in this activity, you will gain knowledge about new functionality directly from the source and ultimately influence the direction of the Oracle products.

Angela Johnston, from left, Teena Singh and Tejas Peesapati from the Oracle Applications User Experience Team host the UX Lab at one of the Oracle User Group Conferences.    

When & Where: Usability feedback sessions will be conducted during the UKOUG Apps13 Conference in London on Monday, October 14th, and Tuesday, October 15th, at The Brewery in the Cardington conference room.

Who can participate? What will we test?

  • Oracle Fusion Application’s simplified user interface with social media features: We are looking for feedback on how well social media features can be used in the context of Oracle’s Fusion HCM applications. Social media features allow the creation and exchange of user-generated content.
    • Participants: any type of manager with at least 2 direct reports who use any Oracle enterprise applications and who are savvy users of social networking sites and/or collaboration tools.

  • PeopleSoft Mobile Time & Labor: We will test features such as reporting and updating punch time and holiday time using a mobile version of PeopleSoft Time and Labor flow. This research will be conducted on a smartphone.
    • Participants: anyone who uses PeopleSoft Time and Labor or another  third-party time reporting application as well as a smartphone.

  • HCM Manager/Executive Dashboard (Infolets View): We will collect feedback on interactivity, animation, visualization, and content organization on Manager Dashboard.
    • Participants: managers who manage at least 3 direct reports and use one Oracle HR product such as Fusion, E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft or Taleo.
  • Next-Generation UI Concepts: Provide early feedback on new design ideas for the next generation of Oracle Fusion Applications.
    • Participants: anyone who is familiar with Oracle Applications such as HCM, CRM, SCM, Financials, Procurement, etc.
  • New contest management capabilities in Oracle’s HCM offering: If you are interested in being able to run contests to help engage and motivate your employees, you must check out this activity.
    • Participants: individuals who run contests or competitions at their company. This can include things like: hackathons, best-ideas contests, sales contests, incident ”burn-downs” contests, ride-share/commuter contests, etc.
  • Data visualization, eye-tracking and emotional valence: We will use mobile eye-tracking equipment and facial recognition software to record participants’ physical responses during a feedback session. We will also collect verbal feedback on various design concepts on data visualizations for future versions of Oracle applications.
    • Participants: any enterprise software users who have to review reports and occasionally use Excel to generate charts based on data.

Contact Us
This event fills up quickly, and seats are limited. Advance registration is required. In order to reserve a spot for yourself and your colleagues, complete this Sign Up registration form. Contact jeannette.chadwick@oracle.com for additional questions.

Attend these presentations to learn about the Oracle User Experience strategy
The Oracle Applications User Experience team will give several presentations at Apps13 that offer a look at the strategy behind the Oracle user experience. Come to these sessions to get a look ahead at where the user experience is going.

Presentation: Applications Transformation Community Keynote
Presenter: Jeremy Ashley

Presentation: Update on PeopleSoft User Experience Enhancements
Presenter: Harris Kravatz

Presentation: Tailoring Your Applications User Experiences in the Cloud

Presenter: Kristin Desmond and Ultan O'Broin

You can also visit the Usable Apps Events page to see where these presentations at Apps13 will be held.

Sunday Sep 29, 2013

Apps UX likes to share! Evolving outreach effort continues with Oracle partners

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

As an experiment, the Oracle Applications User Experience (UX) team recently combined forces with the Oracle PartnerNetwork for a pilot event that lays the foundation for certification as an Oracle Fusion Applications User Experience Specialist.

Misha Vaughan -- who directed this event, leads the Applications UX Communications & Outreach team, and owns the Voice of User Experience (VoX) blog -- said workshops like these help both partners and customers understand the investment Oracle has made in the user experience of its cloud applications. We featured Oracle Fusion Applications in this pilot event because that’s what our partners were looking for, but many of the user experience concepts and resources through this workshop apply to all of Oracle’s cloud applications. This particular pilot, however, was intended to be an overview for anyone starting on a Fusion Applications pre-sales project. 

Presentations throughout the day were wide-ranging. The day began with a look at Oracle’s process for researching and designing the applications user experience, and included an hour on how to demo the Oracle Fusion Applications user experience.

Immediate Access: What you need to know
One of the user experience main messages for our cloud user experience

Participants also got a look at what’s ahead in the Fusion user experience, and were introduced to several projects that lay between the concept and development stages. The Apps UX team also gave partners a taste of how Oracle designs got where they are with a look at the labs, where we do much of our research work in customer feedback activities, and a chance to see what a customer feedback session looks like.

The day ended with presentations on tailoring the Fusion Applications user experience, for both the business analyst using composers, and for the developer using UX design patterns.

Feedback on the day

This first workshop was attended by members of the Hitachi Consulting team, who implement Oracle solutions in the United States. Here’s a sample of their comments after the workshop: 

Sona Manzo, Vice President, U.S. Oracle Solutions – HCM, Hitachi Consulting 

You mentioned that you would use some of the tailoring content for global training.  What, in particular, did you find useful? 

“Regarding the tailoring content, this will be a particular focus for our HCM and CXM teams, both in terms of the capabilities now available as well as the extensibility options through use of the design patterns Oracle has made available. 

“As part of Hitachi, we are partnering with our sister companies to deliver on Hitachi’s vision - Inspiring the Next.  We are continually looking for innovative ways to enable social innovation through technology, so we will be looking for potential applications in that arena.”

After the lab tour, you noted that it's one thing to get feedback as you try to finalize the product; it's another to get it as you're building the project. How does this change your perception of the Oracle user experience?

“Seeing the usability lab firsthand and hearing about the science behind the testing was eye-opening! I was very impressed with the level of investment Oracle has made to understanding all aspects of the user experience; not just the utilization and usability of the Oracle applications,  but indeed how individuals are doing their job. This included understanding the true workflow required across multiple applications/systems, and the frequency and tools used in non-Oracle application tasking and communication. The analysis done on the data and the resulting utilization in the design has led to a much more intuitive and powerful user experience. This foundational work and usability feedback loops built in the development process are in some cases readily apparent, and in others transparent to the user.  Eye-tracking, for example, provides invaluable input on where to place functions on the screen for maximum efficiency. I absolutely gained a new appreciation for the innovations that have been delivered and are on the horizon.”

David T. Ball, Senior Manager, U.S. Oracle Solutions, Hitachi Consulting 

How did your perception of Oracle change after this workshop?

“I was literally blown away!  

“Some people may think of Oracle as a ‘big box company’, maybe like Microsoft; slow to change and stuck in their roots. At the UX class last week, I was overwhelmed by the energy and talent at Oracle.  Oracle is very in-tune with their customer base and has some cutting-edge ideas, such as the new Fusion mobile interface. The new interface that comes in the newly released version 7 looks very progressive, something Apple would be proud of, compared to the typical Oracle light-blue screens.  

“I was also very impressed with the private tour of the UX testing lab. I had no idea of the time and energy spent on bringing test subjects in to see how they react to the software.  From eye scans that see where on the screen people look first, to cameras that track people’s expressions, this technology and due diligence that Oracle is doing for Fusion knocked my socks off.  There is pure science behind this, which is very cutting-edge and very ‘non-Oracle’.”

Nathaniel Pease, Consulting Manager, Hitachi Consulting 

You called watching the customer feedback session in the usability lab “motivating.” What did you take away from that experience? 

“First, I was very impressed with the tools and technology used to observe, record and learn from the feedback sessions. More importantly, I was overwhelmed with how enthusiastic, engaged, and excited the Oracle team leading the effort was. It was immediately evident that the team has a passion for what they do, are highly qualified, and they want to develop a tool that exceeds all expectations. Witnessing the feedback session and meeting the Oracle team leading the effort confirmed that opportunities for improvement are being exposed and creative solutions are being designed for today and the future.”

We love to share 

We love to share our vision for the Oracle User Experience. We hope we’ll be able to continue our work with Oracle’s partners, and enable those who are interested to earn certification as an Oracle Fusion Applications User Experience Specialist. If you’d like more information about attending a workshop like this, leave a comment here or contact Misha.Vaughan@oracle.com.

Saturday Aug 24, 2013

What’s Coming for Oracle’s Applications User Experience Customers at OpenWorld 2013

By Misha Vaughan, Director, Oracle Applications User Experience

We are literally just a few weeks away from Oracle’s biggest annual event for meeting with customers and partners from around the world. This year, the Oracle Applications User Experience (Apps UX) team is unveiling some pretty exciting things that we are very pleased to share with you.

First among our projects is an update from last year’s presentation around simplicity. We are still talking about simplicity, but we’ve added mobility and extensibility into the mix – which you can read more about in an article on UsableApps.

Simplicity: The Essential Information to Complete Your Work

OpenWorld 2013 Sessions

Apps UX Vice President Jeremy Ashley will be talking about what simplicity, mobility, and extensibility mean for Oracle’s cloud applications user experiences at his OpenWorld presentations. You can catch him here:  

CON8029: Oracle Applications User Experiences In the Cloud: Trends and Strategy

Learn how simplicity, consistency, and emerging trends are driving the applications user experience strategy at Oracle. We will talk about trends in mobile workers and their devices in the cloud, gamification, new ways to visualize information, consumer-like experiences, and how to create applications that require a light touch and zero training. See the first demos of what’s new in the pipeline for Oracle Applications user experiences here.

Date: Monday Sept 23rd
, 2013
Time: 4:45-5:45 pm

Location: Moscone West 2006/2008

If you are a customer and interested in the deeper story about tailoring technologies and tools that are available for Oracle’s cloud applications user experiences, you can find a lot more detail in this panel, which will be chaired by Killian Evers, Senior Director, and will include Tim Dubois, Architect, talking about our composer tool set. Ultan O’Broin (@ultan), Director, will talk about Apps UX design patterns and ADF tooling, and Floyd Teter (@fteter), Executive Vice President, EiS Technologies, will share a success story.

CON8493: Tailoring Your Applications User Experiences in the Cloud

Date:  Weds Sept 25th, 2013
Time: 11:45am-12:45 pm
Location: Moscone West 3001

On-Site Usability Labs

There are a few more things available for customers, including access to the Apps UX on-site Oracle Usability Labs. If you sign up to participate, you can find out what Oracle thinks the future will look like and give us your feedback about what the future should look like.  Gozel Aamoth, Manager, Applications User Experience, said that this year attendees will get a preview of products designs for:

  • Oracle Fusion HCM and SCM
  • Fusion Applications Help
  • Oracle Social Relationship Management
  • Mobile Design Patterns
  • My Oracle Support
  • Oracle Social Network
  • Oracle E-Business Suite, that's right. E-Business Suite (thank you Steven Chan & Sara Woodhull!)
  • WebCenter Portal and more

The on-site usability labs at Oracle OpenWorld

Regardless of your job title, we can offer you a session that might interest you. Here are just a few job profiles we are looking for:

  • Employees
  • Business Analysts
  • Functional Subject Matter Experts
  • Marketing professionals
  • IT professionals
  • Developers, System Administrators
  • Product Managers
  • Managers of all levels more

If you want in on one of these sessions, reach out now to angela.johnston@oracle.com. Advance registration is required, and the slots are filling up.  

Cloud Applications User Experiences: The Future of What Your Employees Will Touch, See, & Hear

Check out our demopod this year at OpenWorld and take the chance to try out the new simplified user experience first-hand. You will also have an opportunity to chat about what’s happening with mobile design. 

Get on the Bus!

If you're staying through Thursday, Sept. 26, sign up for one of Oracle’s exclusive tours at Oracle Headquarters in Redwood Shores, California.  Customers and partners are invited to hop on 
one of our chartered buses to Oracle Headquarters to see where Oracle brings together best practices to create innovative, next-generation user experiences.

The Oracle Usability Lab Tour Bus

Our usability experts will demonstrate an eye-tracking device, how Oracle’s usability experts use an interactive SMART board, and show the latest design concepts for mobile enterprise applications on different mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets.

Round-trip transportation will be provided from the InterContinental Hotel in San Francisco to Oracle Headquarters.  Return times are estimated, depending on traffic.  Advanced sign-up is recommended, and spaces will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

To join a tour, register here.  For additional questions, email gozel.aamoth@oracle.com.

Saturday Jun 15, 2013

Hands-On Workshop with Fusion Applications and ADF UX Desktop Design Patterns

By Misha Vaughan, Applications User Experience

Oracle Fusion Applications

I hosted a team of internal Oracle Fusion Apps Sales leaders and a few select Oracle partners on May 14-16, 2013, at Oracle HQ in Redwood Shores. This was the second version of the Applications User Experience team’s "How to Build Great-Looking Usable Apps" workshop.  

This was a revised version of an event we piloted a few months before in the UK. This time around, we added:
  • A couple of bridge-building pieces to help attendees move from wireframe to design patterns to ADF components more clearly.
  • A day on mobile UX design patterns and mobile ADF.
Attendees want to attend this workshop for one of two reasons: 1) They need to extend Fusion Apps, and they want to understand what the UX best practices are for doing this, 2) they want to build a custom application, or even just a page, with ADF, and they don't want to start from scratch on the user experience.

To give you an idea of the agenda, here are the key speakers and their areas of focus:
  • Ultan O'Broin (@ultan, @usableapps): Focusing on the enterprise applications UX design principles, defining what "UX design patterns" are, and explaining why wireframing is such a key part of Oracle’s UX design pattern strategy.
  • Misha Vaughan: I was standing in for my team member Katy Massucco on a presentation she calls "art school in a box," or the 8 things any developer needs to know about the visual design of enterprise UIs.
  • Scott Robinson: On how we move step-by-step from wireframes to UX desktop design patterns, as well as the design guidance we are developing for identifying "simplified" use cases for enterprise apps.
  • Lynn Munsinger: On all of the hands-on content. She is really walking attendees through two very thorough exercises, on Procurement and on a trouble-ticket flow, as well as a great presentation on how to move from screenshots to ADF components.  
  • Richard Bingham (@richardbingham): Detailing how we make use of composers as part of the Fusion Apps tailoring story, as well as covering his new role in Fusion Apps Developer relations.
  • Floyd Teter (@fteter) : On how he used UX design patterns and ADF Essentials to bootstrap his UX and deliver a well-designed product ridiculously fast.
  • Mark Vilrokx: He is exploring use cases and technology for integrating with Fusion apps in the cloud.
  • Kristin Desmond: On the new simplified UI's tailoring strategy for Fusion Apps and where we are with UX design patterns for simplified UIs.
  • Lynn Rampoldi-Hnilo: Covering a great set of "top 10" things you need to know for designing mobile applications as well as shepherding attendees through wireframing a mobile application.
  • Brent White: On the visual design guidance for mobile UIs, as well as teaming up with Lynn on wireframing.
  • Joe Huang: On how ADF Mobile is built to support UX design patterns and deliver a great mobile user experience.
  • Teena Singh and Lulit Bezuayehu: On how a developer can write a user profile and learn to run his or her own usability test using resources from UX Direct.
I think you know why I felt so tired by the end of the week. We hit a lot. Most of this agenda came from the combined brain power of Ultan O'Broin and Lynn Munsinger. So it's ironic that Ultan could not even attend. He managed to take a very nasty nose-dive over his bicycle handle bars the Sunday before the event.

Thanks very much to Jeremy Ashley, my boss, for stepping in to present as well as Scott Robinson for biting off more than he expected in this portion of the workshop.

So, how did we do?
See for yourself:

Floyd Teter, EiS Technologies: "Great workshop. Covered stuff I can take back to the job and use."  

Sten Vesterli, Scott/Tiger: He clearly got the value of design patterns. "I was just watching my son play the Neverwinter MMORPG beta. The user interface looks just like other MMORPGs and he could jump right in and start playing.

That’s not because the people at Cryptic Studios lack imagination - it’s because their users already have an expectation of how an MMORPG should look. It would be stupid to risk turning people away by inventing a brand new user experience (UX). Instead, they are using a User Experience Design Pattern that their users recognize."

Floyd Teter, Sten Vesterli, Mick McGee
Floyd Teter, EiS Technologies; Sten Vesterli, Scott/Tiger; and Mick McGee, EchoUser.

How do you get access to this?
We were fortunate enough to have Tom Barrett and Jonathan Vinoskey from Oracle Alliances & Channels (A&C) representing Oracle Applications partner interests.  They stayed the full 3 days!  Talk about troupers.

Jonathan Vinoskey, Tom Barrett
Jonathan Vinoskey & Tom Barrett, Oracle, creating a wireframe for a trouble-ticket application.

I have been working with our key speakers and A&C on the best ways to re-deliver this content.  Right now, we are looking at a series of in-person training events that we are planning to offer globally -- not a huge number of them, as the guidance has been that attendees get the most out of having access to the seasoned UX pros, but hopefully enough for the really eager to get started with design patterns and ADF.  We will also be offering a series of these sessions as recordings, as an OPN learning path.

You can also expect to see excerpts from the workshop on the UsableApps blog in the months ahead.

Wednesday Apr 17, 2013

Stay on Top of the Latest Trends in Enterprise User Experiences

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experiences

Find your local expert in:

Dubai | Cyprus | Athens | Johannesburg  | Jordan | Prague | Moscow | Doha | Bucharest | Abu Dhabi | Munich | London | Gothenburg | Brussels | Copenhagen | Utrecht | Chicago | San Francisco | Washington DC

Photographs by Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience
Amsterdam canals, above, were outside the location for a recent workshop on enterprise applications user experience. 

In the fall of last year, the Apps UX team met with and updated the Apps UX Sales Ambassador (SAMBA) team in North America with a reprise of last year’s sales training event.

The SAMBA team is a global group of senior-level application solution consultants and applications technologists who provide front-line feedback on the Oracle applications user experience strategy and roadmap. We now officially welcome to the fold representation from Oracle’s Partner team, Alliances and Channels, as well.

Their brethren in Europe, Middle East, and Africa also wanted a chance to see and give feedback on what's new, what's coming, and what is officially "wow" in applications user experiences.  So we took our workshop on the road to create more regional user experience experts.

The new Oracle University training facility in Dubai, near where more UX training was conducted. Highly recommended!

What did they learn?
There was a significant focus on the Oracle Fusion Applications next-generation user experiences, with an in-depth discussion of the new simplified user interface, updates to the desktop user interface, as well as the role of Fusion's native applications.  There was also an extended conversation about how this frames Oracle's overall cloud user experience strategy.

Attendees also got a much more detailed view into how these innovations are spread across the Applications Unlimited product lines, such as E-Business Suite, Siebel, JD Edwards, and PeopleSoft. We offered specific examples of how Oracle invests in codifying proven, tested solutions to usability problems, known as user experience design patterns,  that any existing product can family leverage.

Ultan O'Broin, Director, Applications User Experiences, discusses how user experience design patterns allow developers to leverage Oracle innovations across applications products.

Finally, the main event: The applications user experience roadmap with Jeremy Ashley, Vice President of the Apps UX team. What are the next set of big ideas that we are paying attention to and doing research and development around? 

You can get an inkling of the conversation here. Both presenters and attendees debated the merits and risks of simplification, gamification, voice technology, and how to create frameworks for extending these platforms to tailor a user experience to the way a customer's business really needs to function.

Lynn Rampoldi-Hnilo, Director, Mobile User Experience, talks about voice integration for end users of enterprise applications.

Special Thanks
Special thanks to Kevin Li, Edward Dewolf and Julian Peters from Europe, and Anand Subramanian from Middle East and Africa, for serving as our spirit guides, and teaching us what you need for your customers and partners. 

Julian Peters, Master Principal Sales Consultant, UK

Anand Subramanian, Middle East and Africa Fusion Apps Leader, Dubai

Edward Dewolf, Principal Sales Consultant, Belgium

A last thank you to Andrew Gilmour for staying calm under pressure to help execute an awesome series of workshops.

Andrew Gilmour, Fusion User Experience Advocates and Apps UX Sales Ambassador Programs

For customers and partners
If you are interested in a briefing and want to stay on top of what's coming in applications user experiences, connect with your local solution consultant or alliances and channels representative -- they will reach out to our Apps UX Sales Ambassadors and can deliver an update for you. 

If you are fortunate enough to find your way to a local user group event, we try to make sure we have a representative from our team on the ground.  Check out our events pages on the UsableApps Web site.

Thursday Apr 11, 2013

The Cloud User Experience: Changing Everything for Users

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

Cloud-delivered applications are one of those things you watch to see how the  phenomenon is going to fully express itself.  It’s one of those industry-wide happenings, perhaps even more compelling than tablet computers, that is making the world a better place for users.

Consumers have already seen the benefit of a cloud approach with tailored, consumer-driven experiences on sites like eBay.  

Whether it’s using a desktop user interface (UI) with powerful features such as a merchant user interface for uploading 100 long and short descriptions and photos, or a simplified UI on a tablet for browsing through items from the comfort of your couch, or monitoring an auction on your smart phone using a native application, these custom, tailored experiences are really enabled by cloud computing.  

Think about that. These user interfaces are tailored for what you are doing, on specific devices, and considering specific contexts of use. Add to that a consumer-level design aesthetic, and industrial-grade security, and you have the makings of a pleasant little revolution for enterprise users.

Enterprise Apps in the Cloud Should Work the Way You Do

Marry ease-of-use, device-savvy design, custom-fit experiences, role-based access, international compliance, and security -- that’s a heady combination. It means that users can and should expect their cloud-delivered solutions to work the way they need.

Let me give you some examples.  If I am a VP of sales, I am likely very mobile and use a simplified UI on a tablet quite a bit to browse and analyze my pipeline on the road.  But if I need to sit down and crank out a deeper level of analysis for territory modeling, I am only going to do that from the comfort of a delightfully wide screen on a desktop UI.  If I am dashing from a customer meeting to the airport, I want a quick user interface via a native application on my smartphone to capture only essential information.

If I am a general ledger clerk, I probably need access to a large-screen user interface.  In fact, if you try to make me do my day-to-day work on a tablet, I would likely smack you with it.  But I may be perfectly happy submitting my vacation schedule from a tablet-kiosk in the lunchroom.

It’s a pretty exciting time of change in enterprise software right now, and I am a big fan of these kinds of changes.  It means that our end users will only benefit.  Stay tuned to the Voice of User Experience (VoX) blog to hear more about some of the new stuff coming from Oracle.  

Monday Oct 10, 2011

Oracle OpenWorld 2011: Applications User Experience Hits a High Note

by Misha Vaughan

Well, how could you miss Oracle’s Applications User Experience announcements this year! Holy moley

Larry Ellison

Photos by Martin Taylor, Oracle Applications User Experience

Oracle CEO Larry Ellison announces the general availability of Oracle Fusion Applications during Oracle OpenWorld 2011 in San Francisco on Oct. 5.

Steve Miranda, Senior Vice President of Applications Development for Oracle, was on stage for several keynotes during OpenWorld 2011, where he repeatedly opened the door to discussion about the Oracle Applications User Experience.

On Wednesday, Oct. 5, at the keynote, Oracle CEO Larry Ellison announced the general availability of Oracle Fusion Applications. I did not see that coming, but I suppose I should have. To give full credit, Steve Miranda also announced GA for Fusion Applications in the morning session. Miranda is Senior Vice President of Applications Development for Oracle.

What a pleasure to be able to talk to customers about Fusion now! For those who missed it, Jeremy Ashley and Katie Candland, of Oracle, and Edward Roske, InterRel CEO, covered new design directions for next-generation user experiences as well as the core role played by Fusion Middleware in building the experiences.

A story that I think often gets lost in the shuffle is the benefit Oracle has of a centralized user experience team. Yeah, we got to rock the user experience research and design of Fusion Applications, but not many customers understand that all of our existing product families are benefiting from that same work, too.

As spelled out in a session by Oracle’s George Hackman, Madhuri Kolhatkar, and Harris Kravatz, the existing applications have all done their homework to understand what they can start adding -- and give customers the benefits of Fusion Applications today. Just take a look, for example, at the new Fusion-inspired navigation coming in PeopleSoft and JD Edwards. That is the power of design patterns.

The Applications General Session hosted by Miranda was a bonus pack of user experience updates as well across all of the product lines. I wish I could find a decent video summary of the session to point you to. If I do, I will amend the post.

Oracle Fusion Applications in the Cloud:
And how could I miss the last little bit of Ellison’s announcement? Fusion Applications in the cloud, CRM and HCM! I expect customers will be interested to see how these offerings play side-by-side. The good news, from a user experience standpoint? It’s all the same user experience, whether in the cloud, on-premise, or a hybrid solution. The best solution comes down to a thoughtful analysis of a customer’s business needs.

: There was also a nice iPad nod in the keynote. Oracle developers have been busy getting Fusion Applications onto the iPad. However, don’t let the existing product families go unnoticed, like the hard-working JD Edwards team who smoked ‘em all by getting the first enterprise application native on an iPad out of the door. Nice job guys, and a great presentation, too.

How do I learn more about the Oracle Applications User Experience?

If you are just kicking yourself for missing some of these great sessions, we have team members, both inside and outside Oracle, who will be presenting in the months ahead. Check out our upcoming events.


Check here for news and upcoming events from Oracle's Applications User Experience team on the Oracle Applications Cloud and more.

Misha Vaughan
Misha Vaughan, Senior Director, Applications User Experience
@mishavaughan on Twitter

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