Thursday Mar 20, 2014

Simplified UI and the Oracle User Experience in Oracle Applications Cloud Release 8

With the launch of Oracle Applications Cloud Release 8 this month, the Oracle Applications User Experience team gets another opportunity to talk about its simplified user interface (UI) and how our usability research is moving the Oracle user experience forward. 

The simplified UI is the modern, intuitive, streamlined interface for the Oracle Applications Cloud that brings to the surface frequently performed tasks, works across platforms, and requires no training. Oracle debuted this simple, mobile, and extensible interface in Oracle Applications Cloud Release 7, in Oracle Human Capital Management (HCM) Cloud and Oracle Sales Cloud. That release in Fall 2013 illustrates the interface's focus on quick-entry, light-touch, contextual tasks that are tailored by role.

Oracle Applications Cloud Release 8 is an extension of the same themes of simplicity, mobility, and extensibility that set the simplified UI apart. Oracle HCM Cloud and Oracle Sales Cloud can now take advantage of these user experience enhancements:

  • Expanded simplicity: Additional self-service, quick-action tasks are brought to the surface in this latest release, enabling more people in your company to easily access the essential information and actions that support the way they work in the cloud.
  • Expanded visualizations and analytics: Additional infographic-inspired, tablet-friendly, and interactive visualizations and embedded analytics appear throughout the UI in this release.
  • Expanded extensibility and customization: Not only can you rebrand the simplified UI with your own company logo and watermark and add unique company news and announcements to the simplified UI home page, but you can now restructure and rename the available functional areas and pages. 
Here's a look at just a few highlights in the simplified UI in Release 8.


Oracle Applications Cloud Release 8 Simplified UI Entry Experience

Time entry
Time in Oracle HCM Cloud Release 8

Sales Campaigns
Sales Campaigns in Oracle Sales Cloud

Succession Plans
Succession Plans In Oracle HCM Cloud

Dashboard
Dashboard in Oracle Sales Cloud


Settings Structure
Settings in Simplified UI: Structure

Check the Usable Apps web site to read more about the user experience in the Oracle Applications Cloud.  

Monday Mar 17, 2014

Meet the Apps UX Team in Las Vegas during COLLABORATE14

By Gozel Aamoth, Oracle Applications User Experience

COLLABORATE14, a technology and applications forum for the Oracle community, will take place at The Venetian and the Sands Expo & Convention Center in Las Vegas, April 7-11, 2014.

If you are an Oracle customer and scheduled to attend this conference, there are several ways to meet face-to-face with members of the Oracle Applications User Experience team: sign up for a usability feedback session, visit our demo pod, or attend our presentation on tailoring applications in the cloud.

This is also an opportunity for Oracle sales consultants and partners to see firsthand how Oracle dedicates a significant investment in user experience research and development efforts to maintain and improve Oracle’s products.

Onsite Usability Lab: Sign up to participate in a usability feedback session

Sign up to participate in a user feedback session, where you can contribute to and influence application design and direction through feedback or suggestions while test-driving Oracle’s next-generation applications. Your feedback will directly affect the existing and future usability of Oracle applications, and help us develop applications that are intuitive and easy to use.

What will we test? Participants will get a preview of Oracle product designs for Oracle HCM Cloud, the new user experience for Oracle Fusion Applications Help, Oracle Fusion Applications for procurement, Taleo recruiting, social relationship management using eye-tracking technology, and more.

Who can participate? Regardless of your current job title, we have a session that might interest you. Here are just a few job profiles we are looking for: Busines Analysts, Recruiters, Hiring Managers, Functional Subject Matter Experts, Application Administrator, Application Developer, Marketing/Communications professionals, Community Managers, Product Evangelists, and more.

Date: Tuesday-Wednesday, April 8-9, 2014 
Location: Sands Expo Meeting Room 401, Level 1 
Time: Advance sign-up is required for this event. RSVP now

*Participation requires that your company or organization has a Customer Participation Confidentiality Agreement (CPCA) on file. If your company or organization does not have a CPCA on file, we will start this process.


If you have questions or wish to recommend your colleagues or customers, please contact angela.johnston@oracle.com.


Angela Johnston and Yen Chan, both from the Oracle Applications User Experience team, welcome participants as they arrive to participate in user feedback sessions at a recent conference.


Attend Applications UX Presentation: Tailoring Fusion Applications User Experience in the Cloud

Oracle Fusion Applications continues to innovate and improve. In this session, learn how easy it is to customize and extend your Oracle Fusion Applications user experience in the Cloud using some of the new additions to Oracle Fusion Applications technology. See how Oracle composers and other features allow for powerful customizations and extensions within the browser and with no coding. We'll look at the Oracle Fusion Applications desktop user interface as well as the simplicity of customizing and extending the simplified user interface.

Date: Tuesday, April 8, 2014
Time: 5:30-6:30 p.m. 
Location: Level 3, Murano - 3201
Session ID: 14456


Visit the UX demo booth: Cloud Applications User Experiences: The Future of What Your Employees Will Touch, See, and Hear

Visit our demo station to see the simplified user interface in action, hear about a new way to interact with your enterprise by smartphone when you're on the go, and learn how to manipulate massive amounts of data elegantly through gestures on a tablet.  

Dates:  Wednesday-Thursday, April 9-10, 2014
Location: Sands Expo, Exhibit Hall A-C, Level 2: Kiosk 58

Demopod

Michael LaDuke, from the Oracle Applications User Experience team, runs the demo station during a recent user group conference.


Please visit the
Usable Apps Events page to learn more about our team’s presence at future conferences.


Sunday Mar 16, 2014

Wearables Design Jam @ Oracle Applications User Experience Labs

By Misha Vaughan (@mishavaughan), Oracle Applications User Experience

The conversation about new technology and what it means for enterprise users keeps moving forward at Oracle. The latest version of that conversation was an inspirational event at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, California, on Feb. 4: a Wearables Design Jam led by Ultan O’Broin, Director, Oracle Applications User Experiences.

Ultan and Sarahi
Photo by Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience
Ultan O’Broin prepares, with his usual style, alongside Sarahi Mireles, for the wearables design jam

The goal of the event was to discuss wearables in the work world, solve an enterprise problem, and have fun. What was different about this event was that there was no coding required – it was a pen-and-paper, creative project.

Participants came from a variety of Oracle teams to share ideas – and compete - such as User Assistance, JD Edwards, the Apps Lab, Enterprise Performance Management, and the Mexico Development Center UX team.

Ultan kicked off the event with an introduction to wearables by calling them smart personal technology devices, worn or carried all the time. “It's about automating and augmenting activities,” he said. “Automating the things you hate, and augmenting the things you love. Using technologies you already know – cameras, watches – with new capabilities – GPS, optical character recognition to perform tasks hands-free, and see or easily capture information.  For us, these experiences are apps that are integrated with data in the cloud.” 

He discussed several consumer examples including Samsung Galaxy Gear watch, Oakley Airwave, Google Glass, and Fitbit Force.  "Right now, it's consumer driven usage, dominated by health and personal fitness,” Ultan said. “These expectations from the personal world will affect user expectations of the enterprise."  Examples in the enterprise space include the Hitachi business microscope. An example closer to home is the use of the Fitbit at Oracle HCM World. Attendees were given Fitbit wrist bands and encouraged to log their steps against other attendees in a fitness campaign.

Wellness leaderboard
The HCM World Wellness leaderboard counts the steps of attendees.

For the participants of our Wearables Design Jam, the challenge was to design enterprise solutions – their own wearables use cases – working in teams of three and four. With only paper, pencils, and wearables stencils, participants brainstormed ideas for wearables that could be useful in an enterprise context.

Stencil
This is an example of a stencil from the Wearables Design Jam.

Teams presented their designs to judge Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), Vice President, Oracle Applications User Experiences. Ideas ranged from smart employee ID badges to gloves to warehouse technology, to OpenWorld conference technology. The winning team presented a smarter OpenWorld badge that collects, shares, and exchanges contact information with attendees.

The winning team
The winning team: Adam Heller, Principal Usability Engineer; Bo Wang, Senior Interaction Designer; and Gurbinder Bali, Director, JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Development.

Ashley said, "The key to wearables is a casual gesture. But you can go even further. Imagine you had warehouse management that took advantage of whoever was nearest, to make it more engaging or using specialists with skills."  He said the winning idea has implicit participation and is immediately available, and it also has immediate analytic capability and integration with Sales Cloud and HCM Cloud.

For more information on wearable computing, check out these related posts:
•    The AppsLab team participates in a recent AT&T developer hackathon in the Wearables track (@appslab).
•    Ultan explores the reactions to Google Glass globally.
•    Marta Rauch takes an awesome ride down Highway 84 through the eyes of Google Glass (@marta).










Saturday Mar 01, 2014

OAUX Expo: Oracle & AMIS bring new Applications Cloud user experiences to Europe on March 18th

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

Lucas Jellema
Photo by Martin Taylor, Oracle Applications User Experience
Lucas Jellema, Chief Technology Officer of Oracle partner AMIS Services BV, gets a look at new Oracle user experiences during a demo with Lulit Bezuayahu, of Oracle, at an OAUX Expo at OpenWorld 2013. The expo was his source of inspiration for an expo in The Netherlands in March 2014.

Lucas Jellema, Chief Technology Officer of Oracle partner AMIS Services BV, first saw the Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) Expo at OpenWorld in September 2013 in San Francisco.

“The expo further enforced the message - simplicity, mobility, extensibility - and what that boils down to in terms of actual user interfaces,” Jellema said after the expo. “It also strengthened my confidence in what the UX team is doing. It helps me believe that Oracle actually can be a leader in UX in the enterprise space.”  He said he recognized the excitement and possibilities for inspiration for Oracle customers and asked if the UX team could bring the same experience to Europe in partnership with AMIS.

Join us on March 18 at the AMIS offices in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The Oracle Applications User Experience team will be showcasing the latest thinking in Oracle’s user experiences from noon to 8pm,  along with talks by speakers including Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), Vice President, Applications User Experiences; Sten Vesterli  (@techthatfits), Senior Principal Consultant, Scott / Tiger; Lonneke Dikmans, (@lonnekedikmans), Managing Parter, Vennster; and, of course, Lucas Jellema (@lucasjellema).

The event will be open to the public, including students, customers, and partners.  Registration is necessary to make sure we can accommodate everyone.    

Attendees can expect to see the latest in Oracle’s thinking on Oracle Applications Cloud user experiences, meet the creative AppsLab development team (@theappslab) try out Oracle’s eye-tracking usability research tool, and participate in talks ranging from wearable technology (@ultan) to Oracle Application Development Framework (ADF) to Oracle Apex by a slate of Oracle and AMIS experts.  There even may be a Tesla user experience on display.

By special request of the AMIS team, Oracle will also host a Secret Chamber that requires customers to be under non-disclosure. Behind these doors, customers will be able to see Oracle’s applications cloud user experience roadmap.

OAUX Expo sign
Photo by Misha Vaughan

We hope to see you there! Please remember to register in advance to ensure your access!
More information is available on the Usable Apps web site.



Tuesday Feb 25, 2014

What is your perspective on enterprise mobility? Tell us!

By Julian Orr, Oracle Applications User Experience

Mobile technology
Photo by Brent White, Oracle Applications User Experience

Is there a certain device capability, such as the ability to capture mobile signatures or remotely wipe a device, that is so important to your mobile workflow that it has influenced your enterprise mobility strategy?  

When it comes to making decisions about your organization’s enterprise mobility strategy, there are a few inescapable themes: 

  • Allowing people to use their own devices vs. having to use company-supplied devices
  • Using browser-based vs. native applications
  • Optimizing your apps for smart phones vs. tablets
  • Whether or not to include or exclude a particular mobile platform.   

That businesses are committing resources to create and execute a mobile strategy is a given. The permutations of approaches to mobile strategies are endless, and the reasons behind them are varied and nuanced.  

These approaches and their justifications are well understood from a generic enterprise perspective, but what are the common themes of an Oracle customer’s mobile strategy? How does it vary from that of the marketplace as a whole?

If one thing is clear, it is that Oracle customers want to do big things with mobility.   

At Oracle, we are committed to using customer feedback to continually improve our products and services, and to help you realize exceptional business outcomes.   

As such, Oracle has created a survey to capture and understand enterprise mobility from an incredibly important perspective, that of an Oracle customer.

We want to know what our customers are doing now, what you plan to do in the near future, and most importantly, what are the key influences to your strategy -- employee engagement, security, cost, or something we have yet to hear about.  

Please take our enterprise mobility survey. The survey will remain open until March 28, and will take about 15 minutes to complete.  The survey also includes a follow-up option to become more involved in Oracle applications research.   

To learn more about the Applications User Experience team, please visit the UsableApps web site.


Thursday Feb 20, 2014

New Oracle developers get a taste of Raspberry Pi

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

There is a team within the Oracle Applications User Experience (UX) group that basically plays with interesting technology. We call them the AppsLab (@theappslab). That technology may include fuzzy ears  (@ultan) that interact with your brain waves, robot arms, or Google Glass.

Recently, it included Raspberry Pi. And a day of hacking.

My team -- the Communications & Outreach arm of the Applications UX group -- sometimes works closely with this team. My boss has her own set of fuzzy ears. I’ve tried out the robot arms (I totally suck at moving them). And recently, I was introduced to Raspberry Pi.

Now, I’m a word person – if this small computer had been named anything else, my eyes might have glazed over. But the chance to tell folks about the creative ways that Oracle investigates and explores technology that can evolve the Oracle user experience … well, I’m much better at doing that. Especially if I’ve got a visual place from which to start the story.

Raspberry Pi
Raspberry Pi in use during the Oracle Apps UX hackday
Photos by Rob Hernandez

Raspberry Pi, above, is actually an inexpensive computer that was originally made for kids. It was intended to give kids a device that would help them learn how to program computers. (Neat story there from the U.K. creators.)

Noel Portugal (@noelportugal), the developer who led the January training and hackday, said the credit-card-sized computer can do anything that a Linux computer can do. It’s easy to hook up and, because it costs about $35, easy to replace. So it’s a perfect starting point for kids, and it has an Oracle connection: Oracle’s Java evangelists worked with the Raspberry Pi creators directly to make sure Java runs natively on the device.


Noel’s one-day event included about 15 developers who also work for the Oracle Applications User Experience team. Many were from Oracle’s Mexico Development Center; others came from the Denver area or the Northwest. AppsLab talking head Jake Kuramoto said the idea was to provide a shortcut to the technology and tap into Noel’s experience with it, then get everyone up and running on it. The day was a way to investigate something new in a collaborative session.

Noel Portugal
Noel Portugal, center, hands out mini computers during the Raspberry Pi hackathon.

This hackathon took place at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, inside the Oracle usability labs. By the end of the day, I was hearing random, sometimes crazy noises as network hook-ups took hold and programming began.

Our developers were using the Raspberry Pi with their laptops and smart phones to create sounds, issue commands, and send signals through various devices. Noel said the maker community uses Raspberry Pi to control robotics, control a server, switch lights and off, and connect sensors, among other things.

Here’s a look at our developers at work.

Fernando
Fernando Jimenez shows off his button thing that was hooked up to Raspberry Pi and now plays Pandora.

Sarahi Mireles
Sarahi Mireles (@sarahimireles), center, makes something happen on Twitter with Raspberry Pi, and all the guys cheer.

Luis Galeana
I don’t know what developer Luis Galeana is doing, but you can tell it’s a big deal. Notice that he had to fuel up with a Snickers midway through.

OK, so some of this stuff was over my head. But it was fun to watch really focused, talented people do something they thought was fun. The creative bursts that come through while investigating and exploring are motivational. Technology, in any form, is fascinating. When applied to everyday objects in ways that evolve the user experience – it’s like watching science fiction unfold. But on the Oracle Applications User Experience team, it’s real.

The Applications UX team’s mission is to design and build “cool stuff,” as Jake puts it. Team members look at all kinds of technologies, because we know through research that this is what our users are also doing.

Stay tuned to VoX to learn more about the new, interesting, and creative ways we are evolving the user experience of enterprise software with similar methods of exploration. Be the first to see what’s coming!

Wednesday Feb 12, 2014

OUAB Member Harvard University Uses UX Direct for New PeopleSoft Campus Solutions

By Anna Wichansky*, Oracle Applications User Experience

Madhuri Kolhatkar, Michele Snyder, and Chaya Bijani of the Oracle Applications User Experience (UX) team made a weeklong site visit to Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., in December, to help the university’s IT team kick-start the user-centered design process for a new implementation of PeopleSoft Campus Solutions.

Madhuri created the Applications UX Direct program and chairs a Working Group by that name for the Oracle Usability Advisory Board. UX Direct enables software professionals to use the Oracle UX design process, to reduce implementation complexity and increase user adoption. The team met with a dozen Harvard professors, deans, and business analysts to understand faculty job requirements, context of use, stakeholders, working environments, and potential information flow between the 12 schools and hundreds of departments that comprise this world-famous university founded in 1636. The requirements will help inform the Harvard IT architects’ implementation of PeopleSoft student information systems software, which already reflects student requirements. Harvard joined the OUAB in 2013, and is a regular participant in board programs and training events.


Dr. Harry Lewis, Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University and co-author of popular textbook Elements of the Theory of Computation, displays his office work environment in December 2013.

*Anna is the chair of the Oracle Usability Advisory Board (OUAB) and alumnus of Harvard, 1973.

Tuesday Jan 28, 2014

Apps UX attends Oracle’s new conference in Las Vegas, Oracle HCM World 2014

By Gozel Aamoth, Oracle Applications User Experience

Oracle has announced its first industry conference, Oracle HCM World, to be held on February 4-6, 2014, at The Venetian in Las Vegas, Nevada. Oracle HCM World is designed as a forum for thought leadership, networking, and enhanced understanding of the changing role of human resources (HR) in today’s business world. Leaders of the HR community will discuss the latest happenings and the future of human resources. 

More than 1,500 customers, partners, press and analysts, as well as Oracle sales and product experts, are expected to attend Oracle HCM World. The conference will feature keynotes with Oracle President Mark Hurd and other executives, strategic content for HR professionals, the opportunity to network and see hands-on demonstrations, and ways to get involved with the Oracle Applications User Experience (Apps UX) team through customer feedback sessions and a walk-in lab.

If you are an Oracle customer and scheduled to attend this conference, we invite you to get involved. This is also an opportunity for Oracle sales consultants and partners to see firsthand how Oracle dedicates a significant investment in user experience research and development efforts to maintain and improve Oracle’s products.

User Feedback Sessions

The Apps UX team will host an onsite usability lab, where HR professionals can see early designs of future HCM products, test-drive the product before it goes to market, and ultimately influence the direction of Oracle HCM product development.

We are looking for employees and managers to provide feedback on HCM applications that use social tools and voice. The one-on-one feedback sessions are very popular, and seats are limited. Advance registration is required. RSVP now.

Oracle mobile usability labs
Oracle customers get a preview of Oracle HCM Cloud Service applications at Oracle OpenWorld 2013 in San Francisco, USA.

Meet the UX Experts Walk-In Lab

Whether you have 5 minutes, 15 minutes, or half an hour, stop by the UX Walk-In Lab, where you can see a one-on-one demo and learn more about how user testing is conducted with a UX expert. Additionally, you can learn how you and your company can participate in future design and user research activities.  Advanced registration is not required.

Meet the Experts Station
Members of Apps UX team conduct an interactive eye-tracking demo on Oracle HCM Cloud Service application at UKOUG Apps13 conference in London, UK.

When & Where:
The onsite usability lab will be open Wednesday, February 5 and Thursday, February 6, 2014. Sessions will be conducted throughout the day at The Venetian Las Vegas Hotel, Venetian/Palazzo Congress Center, Conference room  Delfino 4001 A - 4th level.

If you have questions regarding this event, please contact gozel.aamoth@oracle.com.  For further information on our team’s involvement in this conference, please refer to the events page on Usable Apps.

Monday Dec 16, 2013

Six Things You Can Do Today to Jump-Start Your User Experience for Enterprise Applications

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience


Photo by Martin Taylor, Oracle
A good user experience does not have to be a shot in the dark.

Ahmed Aboulnaga’s recent article in UKOUG Scene, “Usability – Ignored by Developers and Undervalued by Managers” made some great points about the benefits of usability research.  

As I was reading it, I wondered: Would a mid-market or small-market company read this and think, “Well, I just don’t have the budget or time, so I’ll just have to do without.”

Good usability practices are completely possible even on the smallest budget, and with no UX staff.  Here are a few ways that even small IT shops can inject some user experience goodness into their process. 
  1. Identify. Who is your user? We’ve published a cheat sheet on how to do this, courtesy of UX Direct, which is a web site that outlines the user experience process and guidelines Oracle uses.
  2. Work smarter. Jump-start your design with user experience design patterns.  We’ve already invested in the research and testing, so you don’t have to.
  3. Sketch. Wireframe before you code. 
  4. Visuals. A few key things on the visuals: Ultan O’Broin (@ultan) is working with ODTUG to get the word out about visual design for enterprise applications.
  5. Get feedback. Persuade a colleague to show your wireframes to real end users. If you do it yourself, it’s too easy to slant the results in your favor.
  6. Iterate. Re-design and re-test, as resources permit. It helps enormously to separate the business logic of your application from the user interface logic, as in this example (page 41) from Lonneke Dikmans of Vennster (@lonnekedikmans).
At this point, you might be thinking that I am making unrealistic claims, so I’ll point you to one of my favorite success stories. When Greg Duncan was with the City of Las Vegas,  he had the one most important resources -- an executive mandate from his CIO at the time, Joseph Marcella.

If that doesn’t convince you that you can incorporate user experience methodologies into your own process, let me share Floyd Teter’s (@fteter) story about a project with EiS Technologies.  He attended a UX and ADF training workshop and picked up some UX methodologies, like basic usability testing, and delivered a world-class user experience in a matter of weeks using ADF essentials for a reporting tool.  His budget consisted of Otter Pops and a Saturday afternoon of testing with end users.

In a story carried by O Tech Magazine (page 25), Marcel Maas (@mhjmaas) of AMIS actually had the benefit of a user experience designer, Sander Haaksma (@sanderha) of UX Company.  However, they still managed to keep costs down by using an agile methodology.

Would you benefit from UX expertise on a project, either as full-time staff or contracted resources?  Of course you would, because you don’t have to spend time developing a whole new area of personal expertise.   

Is that feasible for you? If not, try just one of the techniques above.

Monday Dec 09, 2013

Partner Gives a Thumbs-Up to Insight on Oracle User Experience

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

Anne Meyer
Anne Meyer of MIPRO Consulting LLC, center, listens along with Kelly Bernie, Senior Manager, Oracle Applications Partner Enablement, left, to a demo from Ivy Leung, Applications User Experience, as she talks about Simplified UI for Oracle HCM Cloud at the OAUX Expo during OpenWorld in San Francisco in September 2013.

In the past 6 months, the Oracle Applications User Experience team has been experimenting with a new way to show the innovative user experiences we are building. This idea of a demo showcase evolved into the OAUX Expo at OpenWorld 2013, in September in San Francisco. Guests, who were required to sign non-disclosure agreements with Oracle and refrain from blogging, Tweeting, or other social media expressions about what they saw, were invited to attend an exclusive reception where they could see demos of just-released and future user experiences. These demos included everything from Simplified UI for the Sales Cloud and HCM Cloud to cutting-edge technology like voice and Google Glass that members of our team are exploring as we consider how to incorporate such technology into future user experiences.

Anne Meyer, representing Oracle partner MIPRO Consulting, was one of about 150 attendees. Here’s what she had to say about the expo and its value:

Q: What were you expecting to see at the OAUX Expo at Oracle OpenWorld 2013?


Anne:
“I wasn’t sure what the format or content would be other than expecting a view of Fusion Release 7.” (Oracle Fusion Applications Cloud Services Release 7)



Q: How did the demos you saw meet your expectations?

Anne: “The demos surpassed my expectations. I have worked with OAUX in the past for one-on-one feedback sessions and have always enjoyed participating in those. In this forum, it was nice to walk up to and see and hear about a variety of innovative prototypes as well as upcoming new features soon to be available in the Oracle product lines.

The innovation of the prototypes was truly exciting. I’m anxious for these products to make it to the marketplace.  Some may be game-changing for Oracle, and how people view Oracle products. They demonstrated a great sense of what the new workforce generation is expecting in the software solutions they use at work. I was particularly excited about the voice recognition prototype. There are endless applications for that capability across the Oracle product lines.”



Q: Would you attend future OAUX Expo events, or bring colleagues to such an event?

Anne: “Absolutely. I always try and expand my company’s participation in OAUX events.”  



Q: How was the OAUX Expo valuable to you and your company?



Anne: "The OAUX Expo was important on many levels.  First, we are implementing Fusion Release 5, so the view into Release 7 was important in our planning for when we upgrade next year.  Second, as I noted in a previous comment, to see the innovation is very exciting to us as we are an organization focused on PeopleSoft and Fusion. It supports our enthusiasm for the products and their future, and how we can infuse that enthusiasm to our clients and prospects.”



Q: Has the OAUX Expo changed your perception of the Oracle user experience?

“I don’t know if it changes my perception per se, because I enjoy participating in the one-on-one feedback sessions. This is just another approach, and a good one, to see more at one time.”

Anne said in a separate email that the expo demonstrated how Oracle is moving forward with technology innovation. “I’ve been a participant in individual user experience sessions, but to put them all together in one room was eye-opening to how there is an overall vision, to where the Oracle products are moving. So having multiple stations to view the innovations gives one a full view, and an exciting one, to the future.” 

She added that the one thing that stood out was the voice recognition technology. “All of my customers and prospects are excited about the mobile technology, but little do they know that the voice recognition technology is potentially on its way. That is very, very exciting. We have customers who have people using PeopleSoft on things like oil rigs. How much more convenient could it be to a foreman to be able to audible rather than type things into PeopleSoft than that?


“The example used was CRM, but I think the real bottom-line usage of voice recognition is, for example, when a nurse on a hospital floor can audible inventory items and not take valuable time to key that in. That’s powerful. That’s ROI as hospitals look to reduce cost to patient days.  That was the most impressive application I saw there.”

Thank you, Anne, for your time and feedback! For more information on how to attend a similar expo event, contact Misha.Vaughan @ Oracle.com.

Monday Dec 02, 2013

Learn more about Simplified UI for Oracle HCM Cloud Applications, new in Release 7

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

Aylin Uysal
Photo by Anne-Marie McReynolds, Oracle Applications User Experience
Aylin Uysal, Oracle, shows the new Simplified UI for HCM users during a special show-and-tell event, before it was generally available in September 2013.

Simplified UI represents the direction that the Oracle user experience is heading for all of its cloud applications.

In September 2013, Release 7 for Oracle Cloud Applications became generally available for Oracle Sales Cloud and Oracle Human Capital Management (HCM) Cloud. This is a significant release for the Oracle Applications User Experience team, and it represents Oracle’s strategy for cloud applications user experiences along the lines of simplicity, mobility, and extensibility.

In Release 7, there’s a particular focus on HCM users, especially self-service users and managers, said Jeremy Ashley, Vice president of the Oracle Applications User Experience group. These users may be knowledge or information workers. They may also be users who don’t use enterprise applications all day – they may be asked to participate in using an HCM application to fill out information so that they can get paid, but it’s not what they do on a daily basis, Ashley said. They could be physical engineers, or production line workers who don’t even use laptops nor have e-mail, but they are all still expected to participate in the HCM system that their company provides.

Providing a consistent user experience for all of these users that doesn’t require weeks of training to navigate a hefty menu was the goal for the Simplified UI for HCM user experience. “If they have to go through four layers to get to the system, they have to be trained,” Ashley said. “So, we have looked to simplify standard employee tasks. Regardless of whether you’re a line worker or an executive, these standard tasks should be easy to do.”

The Simplified UI for HCM focuses on many self-service tasks that every employee needs to do – changing a phone number, checking a pay stub, looking up a co-worker’s information, or managing personal work goals on the company system.

HCM Cloud UI
Team performance in the new Oracle HCM Cloud.

But the full strength of Oracle’s Cloud Applications is always a click or two away, because Oracle recognizes that someone like the vice president of HR in the company also needs professional-strength applications. Simplified UI helps provide both balance and a gateway, because to think that all levels of HR employees can go through one UI is ridiculous, Ashley said. The UI would be either too simple or too difficult.

The Simplified UI for HCM appeals to these many levels of HR participation. All users should be able to approach it and understand it the first time they see it, no matter their comfort level with the deeper Fusion Applications that sit behind the Simplified UI.

The Oracle user experience also includes opportunities to tailor settings for all employees or implement a company brand, in just a few clicks, which provides easy customization to the Simplified UI for HCM Cloud.

Where can you find out more?

To find out more about the simplified UI and Oracle’s ongoing investment in applications user experience innovations, come to one of our sessions at a user group conference near you.

To get a quick view of what the new user expeirence is about, watch these videos on the HCM Cloud Simplified UI for employees and managers.

Thursday Nov 21, 2013

Will You Be Wearing Your Enterprise Application Data?

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

The Oracle Applications User Experience group has begun to explore the role of wearable computing and enterprise use cases, which is part and parcel of our charter to watch for future trends that will matter to our customers’ workforce.  See, for example, some of the recent posts by The AppsLab team and Ultan (@ultan) on wearables.

Heads-Up Displays: Google Glass

Anthony Lai (@anthonyslai), a User Experience Architect at Oracle, has been roaming the halls of Oracle with what are now easily identifiable as Google Glass.  In this post, he talks about his experience using Google Glass and what he has learned about wearing them in an enterprise setting.

Anthony Lai
Anthony Lai
Photo by Misha Vaughan

Q:  Let's start with the basics. What is Google Glass, and what is the vision behind the technology?

A: Glass is a device that is supposed to be non-intrusive, to give you information when you need it.  It is a way for you to quickly know about stuff right away, without even opening up a tablet or device.  It provides notifications to you for things you are interested in.  It provides you with navigation.  You can ask questions in a free-form format.  You can take pictures and do video recording for memories.  Quick snapshots. The photos are nice; they are wide-angle.  

Q: Do people around you find it intrusive at all?  Do they object to the video-recording capacity?

A: If you take a picture, you hear the click sound and there is a flash.  It’s not like you don't know it's happening. That brings in a paradigm about glass.  They position it just above the eye. You need the eye contact to create trust.

Q:  What have you found to be useful for yourself, in terms of work?

The first thing is that I subscribe to things I'm interested in on Twitter.  In Twitter, you can have a lot of people you are following.  You can select which people you want to receive on your Glass.  I put some technology things on there, and Glass would notify me.  I feel like it's really annoying now to go to my phone or my desktop. With Glass, it's just instant. That's key for me.

The other side is in-car navigation.  I was using my phone, but with Glass, I can see straight ahead and get the directions in my ear.  If it is time for you to turn and take actions, it will tell you.  So it's not really distracting you from driving.

Q:  As a developer working for Oracle, what enterprise use cases occur to you?

Take a CRM use case. What does a sales rep need to do when they go into a sales meeting?  What information do they need to know wherever they are?  One example is if there is a sales meeting coming up at 3 p.m., Google Glass can remind you, and then give you quick information, like attendees.  If you want to call an attendee right away, you can.  If you need to make a quick note, if you need to find where the meeting is, how bad traffic is to get there.  

During a meeting, we thought, what if you want to take a picture of the attendees so you don't forget who was at a meeting?  

At the end of the meeting, you may want to debrief.  You go to a coffee shop around the corner, where you can sit and make notes of the meeting with co-workers. You can even run a Google Hangout, or video-conference, with people who are there and not there.

Q: Final thoughts?

It's amazing technology.  I think it is an appropriate technology to move into the future.  I think there are a lot of people right now that are skeptical.  Right now, it is expensive.  Ultimately, the price will go down.  

Wearables: An Executive Perspective

Jeremy Ashley
Jeremy Ashley, Vice President of the Oracle Applications User Experience team, with his Pebble Watch.

"It's not just about Google Glass,” says Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), Vice President of Oracle Applications User Experience. “What we are doing is taking the application of computing power here, and moving away from it being a single device. We are moving to multiple devices that sense the world around you. It's really a matter of what these other devices can provide for you.”

Ashley said users are demanding smaller snippets of more detailed information, like Google Now and Windows tiles. “Instead of providing this large dashboard with this information all over it, you will see little tiles with snippets of information that you can drill on. It's no longer about providing lots of detailed information. It's providing lots of detailed information with context.”

The platforms for information delivery include glasses, watches, and other types of devices. The glasses derive their context from where you are, what you are looking at, and what you are supposed to be doing at that time. They use sight, sound, GPS, motion, direction, gesture and more.

Glasses are piggybacking on a set of interactions that you are already doing, and adding extra information on top of that, as opposed to a computer that you have to walk up to and begin providing context to. Glass augments a lot of your movements to gain input and complete a particular task.

Google Glass is an obvious use case for supply chain, Ashley said, when the user needs a third hand to reference material or communicate with someone about a part or a checklist. It can be recording what you are doing, or provide a channel for another technician to look over your shoulder as you check your work.

More use cases

Wearing Google Glass in meetings might also make sense. The user could be acting as a proxy who is sitting in the room for someone else and providing a feel of the room. 

In the financials spectrum, a user might want to keep information secret as opposed to making information public. Google Glass could be used by a CFO, who receives real-time data as opposed to opening up a laptop in a public place.

“When they say ‘augmentation,’ people think of Borg-like things on your head,” Ashley said. “Instead it’s about taking something that you already have, and just increasing the sensitivity to make it more meaningful or useful.”

As our data moves to the cloud, these kinds of experiences become more possible.

Monday Nov 11, 2013

Moving the Oracle User Experience Forward with the New Release 7 Simplified UI for Oracle Sales Cloud

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

In September 2013, Release 7 for Oracle Cloud Applications became generally available for Oracle Sales Cloud and HCM Cloud. This significant release allowed the Oracle Applications User Experience (UX) team to finally talk freely about Simplified UI, a user experience project in the works since Oracle OpenWorld 2012.

Simplified UI represents the direction that the Oracle user experience – for all of its enterprise applications – is heading.

Oracle’s Apps UX team began by building a Simplified UI for sales representatives. You can find that today in Release 7, and it was demoed extensively during OpenWorld 2013 in San Francisco.



See the the new Simplified UI for Oracle Sales Cloud, a user interface built for sales reps.

Analyst Rebecca Wettemann, vice president of Nucleus Research, saw Simplified UI at Oracle Openworld 2013 and talked about it with CRM Buyer in “Oracle Revs Its Cloud Engines for a Better Customer Experience.

CRM Buyer
Wettemann said there are distinct themes to the latest release:
"One is usability. Oracle Sales Cloud, for example, is designed to have zero training for onboarding sales reps, which it does," she explained. "It is quite impressive, actually -- the intuitive nature of the application and the design work they have done with this goal in mind."

The software uses as few buttons and fields as possible, she pointed out. "The sales rep doesn't have to ask, 'what is the next step?' because she can see what it is."

In fact, there are three themes driving the usability that Wettemann noted. They are simplicity, mobility, and extensibility, and we write more about them on the Usable Apps web site. These three themes embody the strategy for Oracle’s cloud applications user experiences.  

Simplified UI for Oracle Sales Cloud

In developing a Simplified UI for Oracle Sales Cloud, Oracle’s UX team concentrated on the tasks that sales reps need to do most frequently, and are most important. “Knowing that the majority of their work lives are spent on the road and on the go, they need to be able to quickly get in and qualify and convert their leads, monitor and progress their opportunities, update their customer and contact information, and manage their schedule,” Jeremy Ashley, Vice President of the Applications UX team, said.

Ashley said the Apps UX team has a good reason for creating a Simplified UI that focuses on self-service. “Sales people spend the day selling stuff,” he said. “The only reason they use software is because the company wants to track what they’re doing.” Traditional systems of tracking that information include filling in a spreadsheet of leads or sales. Oracle wants to automate this process for the salesperson, and enable that person to keep everyone who needs to know up-to-date easily and quickly. Simplified UI addresses that problem by providing light-touch input.  

“It has to be useful to the salesperson,” Ashley said about the Sales Cloud user experience. Simplified UI can tell sales reps about key opportunities, or provide information about a contact in just a click or two.

Customer screen shot
Customer information is accessible quickly and easily with Simplified UI for the Oracle Sales Cloud.

Simplified UI for Sales Cloud can also be extended easily, Ashley said. Users usually just need to add various business fields or create and modify analytical reports. The way that Simplified UI is constructed allows extensibility to happen by hiding or showing a few necessary fields.

Settings
The Settings user interface, starting in release 7, allows for the simple configuration of the most important visual elements.

“With Sales cloud, we identified a need to make the application useful and very simple,” Ashley said. Simplified UI meets that need.

Where can you find out more?
To find out more about the simplified UI and Oracle’s ongoing investment in applications user experience innovations, come to one of our sessions at a user group conference near you. Stay tuned to the Voice of User Experience (VoX) blog – the next post will be about Simplified UI and HCM Cloud.

Monday Oct 28, 2013

Sangam 13: Hyderabad, India

by Teena Singh, Oracle Applications User Experience

Sangam 13

The AIOUG (All India Oracle User Group) will be hosting Sangam 13 November 8th and 9th in Hyderabad, India. The first Sangam conference was in 2009 and the AppsUX team has been involved with the conference and user group membership since 2011. We are excited to be returning to the conference and meeting Oracle end users there.

For the first time at Sangam the AppsUX team will host an Onsite Usability Lab at the conference. If you or one of your team members is attending the conference and interested in attending a pre-scheduled one on one usability session, contact gozel.aamoth@oracle.com. In addition to pre-scheduled sessions in the Onsite Usability Lab, our team will also be hosting Walk In studies.  Whether you have 5 minutes, 15 minutes, or half an hour, you can experience a one on one demo learn more about how user testing is conducted with a UX expert. Additionally, you can learn how you and your company can participate in future design and user research activities.

The AppsUX team will also be available at the Oracle booth in the Demo area if you want to ask questions.

Finally, you can learn how simplicity, consistency, and emerging trends are driving the applications user experience strategy at Oracle when you attend Thomas Wolfmaier's (Director of SCM User Experience, Oracle) presentation on:

Applications User Experiences In the Cloud: Trends and Strategy,  November 8th, 2013.

For further information on our team’s involvement in the conference, please refer to the events page on Usable Apps here.

Workshops, online content show how Oracle infuses simplicity, mobility, extensibility into user experience

By Kathy Miedema & Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience


Oracle has made a huge investment into the user experience of its many different software product families, and recent releases showcase big changes and features that aim to promote end user engagement and efficiency by streamlining navigation and simplifying the user interface.

But making Oracle’s enterprise software great-looking and usable doesn’t stop when Oracle products go out the door. The Applications User Experience (UX) team recognizes that our customers may need to customize software to fit their work processes. And that’s why we provide tools such as user experience design patterns to help you maintain the Oracle user experience as you tailor your application to fit your business needs.

Often, however, customers may need some context around user experience. How has the Oracle user experience been designed and constructed? Why is a good user experience important for users? How does understanding what goes into the user experience benefit the people who purchase the software for users?

There’s a short answer to these questions, and you can read about it on Usable Apps. But truly understanding Oracle’s investment and seeing how it applies across product families occasionally requires a deeper dive into the Oracle user experience, especially if you’re an influencer or decision-maker about Oracle products.

To help frame these decisions, the Communications & Outreach team has developed several targeted workshops that explore what Oracle means when it talks about user experience, and provides a roadmap into where the Oracle user experience is going. These workshops require non-disclosure agreements, and have been delivered to Oracle sales folks, Oracle partners, Oracle ACE Directors and ACEs, and a few customers. Some of these audience members have been developers or have a technical background; just as many did not. Here’s a breakdown of the kind of training you can get around the Oracle user experience from the OAUX Communications & Outreach team.


For Partners:

Demostation
George Papazzian, Principal, Naviscent with Joyce Ohgi, Oracle

  • Oracle Fusion Applications HCM Pre-Sales Seminar:  In concert with Worldwide Alliances  and  Channels under Applications Partner Enablement Director Jonathan Vinoskey’s guidance, the Applications User Experience team delivers a two-day workshop.  Day one focuses on Oracle Fusion Applications HCM and pre-sales strategy, and Day two focuses on positioning and leveraging Oracle’s investment in the Oracle Fusion Applications user experience.  The next workshops will occur on the following dates:
  • Partner Advisory Board: A two-day board meeting in the U.S. and U.K. to discuss four main user experience areas for Oracle Fusion Applications: simplicity, visualization & analytics, mobility, & futures. This event is limited to Oracle Diamond Partners, UX bloggers, and key UX influencers and requires legal documentation.  We will be talking about the Oracle applications UX strategy and roadmap.

  • Partner Implementation Training on User Interface: How to Build Great-Looking, Usable Apps:  In this two-day, hands-on workshop built around Oracle’s Application Development Framework, learn how to build desktop and mobile user interfaces and mobile user interfaces based on Oracle’s experience with Fusion Applications. This workshop is for partners with a technology background who are looking for ways to tailor Fusion Applications using ADF, or have built their own custom solutions using ADF. It includes an introduction to UX design patterns and provides tools to build usability-tested UX designs.
  • Nov 5-6, 2013 @ Redwood Shores, CA, USA
  • January 28-29th, 2014 @ Reston, Virginia, USA
  • February 25-26, 2014 @ Guadalajara, Mexico
  • March 9-10, 2014 @ Dubai, United Arab Emirates
To register, contact Shannon.Whiteman@oracle.com
  • Simplified UI Customization & Extensibility:  Pilot workshop:  We will be reviewing the proposed content for communicating the user experience tool kit available with the next release of Oracle Fusion Applications.  Our core focus will be on what toolkit components our system implementors and independent software vendors will need to respond to customer demand, whether they are extending Fusion Applications, or building custom applications, that will need to leverage the simplified UI.
    • Dec 11th, 2013 @ Reading, UK
For information: contact Misha.vaughan@oracle.com
  • Private lab tour and demos: Interested in seeing what’s going on in the Apps UX Labs?  If you are headed to the San Francisco Bay Area, let us know. We can arrange a spin through our usability labs at headquarters.
  • OAUX Expo: This open-house forum gives partners a look at what the UX team is working on, and showcases the next-generation user experiences in a demo environment where attendees can see and touch the applications.

  • UX Direct: Use the same methods that Oracle uses to develop its own user experiences. We help you define your users and their needs, and then provide direction on how to tailor the best user experience you can for them.

For Customers

lab team photo
Angela Johnston, Gozel Aamoth, Teena Singh, and Yen Chan, Oracle

  • Lab tours: See demos of soon-to-be-released products, and take a spin on usability research equipment such as our eye-tracker. Watch this video to get an idea of what you’ll see.
  • Get our newsletter: Learn about newly released products and see where you can meet us at user group conferences.
  • Participate in a feedback session: Join a focus group or customer feedback session to get an early look at user experience designs for the next generation of software, and provide your thoughts on how well it will work.
  • Join the OUAB: The Oracle Usability Advisory Board meets several times a year to discuss trends in the workforce and provide direction on user experience designs.
  • UX Direct: Use the same methods that Oracle uses to develop its own user experiences. We help you define your users and their needs, and then provide direction on how to tailor the best user experience you can for them.
For Developers (customers, partners, and consultants):

Developers
Plinio Arbizu, SP Solutions, Richard Bingham, Oracle, Balaji Kamepalli, EiSTechnoogies, Praveen Pillalamarri, EiSTechnologies

  • How to Build Great-Looking, Usable Apps: This workshop is for attendees with a strong technology background who are looking for ways to tailor customer software using ADF. It includes an introduction to UX design patterns and provides tools to build usability-tested UX designs.  See above for dates and times.
  • UX design patterns web site: Cut the length of your project down by months. Use these patterns to build out the task flow you need to develop for your users. The patterns have already been usability-tested and represent the best practices that the Oracle UX research team has found in its studies.
  • UX Direct: Use the same methods that Oracle uses to develop its own user experiences. We help you define your users and their needs, and then provide direction on how to tailor the best user experience you can for them.

For Oracle Sales


Mike Klein, Jeremy Ashley, Brent White, Oracle
  • Contact your local sales person for more information about the Oracle user experience and the training available from the Applications User Experience Communications & Outreach team.
  • See customer-friendly user experience collateral ranging from the new simplified UI in Oracle Fusion Applications Release 7, to E-Business Suite user experience highlights, to Siebel, PeopleSoft, and JD Edwards user experience highlights.  
  • Receive access to the same pre-sales and implementation training we provide to partners.
  • For Oracle Sales only: Oracle-only training on the Oracle Fusion Applications UX Innovation Sales Kit. 


Wednesday Oct 09, 2013

Meet the Apps UX team at UKOUG Apps13 in London, UK, in October

By Gozel Aamoth, Oracle Applications User Experience


This year, the UK Oracle User Group (UKOUG) has created separate conferences for the applications and technology communities. UKOUG Apps13 is the must-attend event for users of Oracle Applications in the United Kingdom.

The Oracle Applications User Experience team is preparing to hit the road in the next few weeks and fly from Oracle headquarters to the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. We will be at UKOUG Apps13 in London, UK, from October 14-16.

Onsite Usability Lab: Get involved, and give us your feedback
Our team has been hosting an onsite usability lab at the UKOUG conference in Birmingham, UK, since 2007. We are extremely excited about the conference changes and looking forward to collaborating with Oracle applications users and experts. Oracle customers and partners who plan to attend this conference or who are local to the London area are invited to participate in a usability feedback session. By participating in this activity, you will gain knowledge about new functionality directly from the source and ultimately influence the direction of the Oracle products.

UKOUG APPS 13
Angela Johnston, from left, Teena Singh and Tejas Peesapati from the Oracle Applications User Experience Team host the UX Lab at one of the Oracle User Group Conferences.    

When & Where: Usability feedback sessions will be conducted during the UKOUG Apps13 Conference in London on Monday, October 14th, and Tuesday, October 15th, at The Brewery in the Cardington conference room.


Who can participate? What will we test?

  • Oracle Fusion Application’s simplified user interface with social media features: We are looking for feedback on how well social media features can be used in the context of Oracle’s Fusion HCM applications. Social media features allow the creation and exchange of user-generated content.
    • Participants: any type of manager with at least 2 direct reports who use any Oracle enterprise applications and who are savvy users of social networking sites and/or collaboration tools.

  • PeopleSoft Mobile Time & Labor: We will test features such as reporting and updating punch time and holiday time using a mobile version of PeopleSoft Time and Labor flow. This research will be conducted on a smartphone.
    • Participants: anyone who uses PeopleSoft Time and Labor or another  third-party time reporting application as well as a smartphone.

  • HCM Manager/Executive Dashboard (Infolets View): We will collect feedback on interactivity, animation, visualization, and content organization on Manager Dashboard.
    • Participants: managers who manage at least 3 direct reports and use one Oracle HR product such as Fusion, E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft or Taleo.
  • Next-Generation UI Concepts: Provide early feedback on new design ideas for the next generation of Oracle Fusion Applications.
    • Participants: anyone who is familiar with Oracle Applications such as HCM, CRM, SCM, Financials, Procurement, etc.
  • New contest management capabilities in Oracle’s HCM offering: If you are interested in being able to run contests to help engage and motivate your employees, you must check out this activity.
    • Participants: individuals who run contests or competitions at their company. This can include things like: hackathons, best-ideas contests, sales contests, incident ”burn-downs” contests, ride-share/commuter contests, etc.
  • Data visualization, eye-tracking and emotional valence: We will use mobile eye-tracking equipment and facial recognition software to record participants’ physical responses during a feedback session. We will also collect verbal feedback on various design concepts on data visualizations for future versions of Oracle applications.
    • Participants: any enterprise software users who have to review reports and occasionally use Excel to generate charts based on data.


Contact Us
This event fills up quickly, and seats are limited. Advance registration is required. In order to reserve a spot for yourself and your colleagues, complete this Sign Up registration form. Contact jeannette.chadwick@oracle.com for additional questions.

Attend these presentations to learn about the Oracle User Experience strategy
The Oracle Applications User Experience team will give several presentations at Apps13 that offer a look at the strategy behind the Oracle user experience. Come to these sessions to get a look ahead at where the user experience is going.

Presentation: Applications Transformation Community Keynote
Presenter: Jeremy Ashley

Presentation: Update on PeopleSoft User Experience Enhancements
Presenter: Harris Kravatz

Presentation: Tailoring Your Applications User Experiences in the Cloud

Presenter: Kristin Desmond and Ultan O'Broin


You can also visit the Usable Apps Events page to see where these presentations at Apps13 will be held.


Sunday Sep 29, 2013

Apps UX likes to share! Evolving outreach effort continues with Oracle partners

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

As an experiment, the Oracle Applications User Experience (UX) team recently combined forces with the Oracle PartnerNetwork for a pilot event that lays the foundation for certification as an Oracle Fusion Applications User Experience Specialist.

Misha Vaughan -- who directed this event, leads the Applications UX Communications & Outreach team, and owns the Voice of User Experience (VoX) blog -- said workshops like these help both partners and customers understand the investment Oracle has made in the user experience of its cloud applications. We featured Oracle Fusion Applications in this pilot event because that’s what our partners were looking for, but many of the user experience concepts and resources through this workshop apply to all of Oracle’s cloud applications. This particular pilot, however, was intended to be an overview for anyone starting on a Fusion Applications pre-sales project. 

Presentations throughout the day were wide-ranging. The day began with a look at Oracle’s process for researching and designing the applications user experience, and included an hour on how to demo the Oracle Fusion Applications user experience.

Immediate Access: What you need to know
One of the user experience main messages for our cloud user experience

Participants also got a look at what’s ahead in the Fusion user experience, and were introduced to several projects that lay between the concept and development stages. The Apps UX team also gave partners a taste of how Oracle designs got where they are with a look at the labs, where we do much of our research work in customer feedback activities, and a chance to see what a customer feedback session looks like.


The day ended with presentations on tailoring the Fusion Applications user experience, for both the business analyst using composers, and for the developer using UX design patterns.

Feedback on the day

This first workshop was attended by members of the Hitachi Consulting team, who implement Oracle solutions in the United States. Here’s a sample of their comments after the workshop: 

Sona Manzo, Vice President, U.S. Oracle Solutions – HCM, Hitachi Consulting 

You mentioned that you would use some of the tailoring content for global training.  What, in particular, did you find useful? 

“Regarding the tailoring content, this will be a particular focus for our HCM and CXM teams, both in terms of the capabilities now available as well as the extensibility options through use of the design patterns Oracle has made available. 

“As part of Hitachi, we are partnering with our sister companies to deliver on Hitachi’s vision - Inspiring the Next.  We are continually looking for innovative ways to enable social innovation through technology, so we will be looking for potential applications in that arena.”

After the lab tour, you noted that it's one thing to get feedback as you try to finalize the product; it's another to get it as you're building the project. How does this change your perception of the Oracle user experience?

“Seeing the usability lab firsthand and hearing about the science behind the testing was eye-opening! I was very impressed with the level of investment Oracle has made to understanding all aspects of the user experience; not just the utilization and usability of the Oracle applications,  but indeed how individuals are doing their job. This included understanding the true workflow required across multiple applications/systems, and the frequency and tools used in non-Oracle application tasking and communication. The analysis done on the data and the resulting utilization in the design has led to a much more intuitive and powerful user experience. This foundational work and usability feedback loops built in the development process are in some cases readily apparent, and in others transparent to the user.  Eye-tracking, for example, provides invaluable input on where to place functions on the screen for maximum efficiency. I absolutely gained a new appreciation for the innovations that have been delivered and are on the horizon.”

David T. Ball, Senior Manager, U.S. Oracle Solutions, Hitachi Consulting 

How did your perception of Oracle change after this workshop?

“I was literally blown away!  

“Some people may think of Oracle as a ‘big box company’, maybe like Microsoft; slow to change and stuck in their roots. At the UX class last week, I was overwhelmed by the energy and talent at Oracle.  Oracle is very in-tune with their customer base and has some cutting-edge ideas, such as the new Fusion mobile interface. The new interface that comes in the newly released version 7 looks very progressive, something Apple would be proud of, compared to the typical Oracle light-blue screens.  

“I was also very impressed with the private tour of the UX testing lab. I had no idea of the time and energy spent on bringing test subjects in to see how they react to the software.  From eye scans that see where on the screen people look first, to cameras that track people’s expressions, this technology and due diligence that Oracle is doing for Fusion knocked my socks off.  There is pure science behind this, which is very cutting-edge and very ‘non-Oracle’.”

Nathaniel Pease, Consulting Manager, Hitachi Consulting 

You called watching the customer feedback session in the usability lab “motivating.” What did you take away from that experience? 

“First, I was very impressed with the tools and technology used to observe, record and learn from the feedback sessions. More importantly, I was overwhelmed with how enthusiastic, engaged, and excited the Oracle team leading the effort was. It was immediately evident that the team has a passion for what they do, are highly qualified, and they want to develop a tool that exceeds all expectations. Witnessing the feedback session and meeting the Oracle team leading the effort confirmed that opportunities for improvement are being exposed and creative solutions are being designed for today and the future.”

We love to share 

We love to share our vision for the Oracle User Experience. We hope we’ll be able to continue our work with Oracle’s partners, and enable those who are interested to earn certification as an Oracle Fusion Applications User Experience Specialist. If you’d like more information about attending a workshop like this, leave a comment here or contact Misha.Vaughan@oracle.com.




Saturday Sep 07, 2013

OpenWorld 2013: What Applications User Experience Has in Store for Partners

By Misha Vaughan, Director, Applications User Experience


In a previous post on the VoX blog, we wrote about what the Applications User Experience team is doing for customers at OpenWorld 2013 this year. So now I thought I would write about what the team is doing for partners.


This year we have made a special effort to create and shape content targeted for Oracle applications partners as well as Fusion Middleware partners. This content is delivered in partnership with the Oracle Worldwide Alliances & Channels team of Jonthan Vinoskey and Tom Barrett.


As a partner at OpenWorld this year, you will hear about the focus of the Applications User Experience team on simplicity, mobility, and extensibility for the evolving Oracle user experience.


We will spell out for partners how Oracle is investing in the future of cloud applications user experiences, and we’ll provide examples of what that looks like. You can find that in this session:


Oracle Partner Network Exchange: Applications User Experiences In the Cloud: Tailoring, Trends and Strategy

Presenters: Jeremy Ashley, Vice President, Applications User Experience, Oracle; Debra Lilley, Fujitsu, Oracle Applications UX Advocate and Oracle ACE Director



Jeremy Ashley, left, and Debra Lilley chat during an interview for UKOUG.

Session ID: CON9817
Date: Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013
Time: 3:45 p.m.-4:45 p.m.
Location: Marriott Marquis, Atrium Level - Club Room

This will be a lively conversation about the priorities of the Applications User Experience team, and you’ll also hear from a partner about hitting user experience issues head-on in deals, and customizing and extending.


We know roadmap sessions are always helpful, but we also like to talk tools with Oracle partners. This year, mobile tools are a hot topic. So, we will deliver a session on what Oracle is doing in the mobile applications space in a presentation that is equal parts strategy and tooling. This presentation will also dive into UX mobile design patterns – what they are, how they can help you, and where to get them.



This wireframe is based on Mobile ADF UX design patterns from the Oracle Applications User Experience team.

Oracle Partner Network Exchange: Oracle's UI Strategy for Mobile Devices
Presenters: Jeremy Ashley, Vice President, Applications User Experience, Oracle; Lynn Rampoldi-Hnilo, Senior Manager, Mobile User Experience, Oracle

Session ID: CON9840
Date: Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013
Time: 11:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Location: Marriott Marquis - Foothill F

This is not part of the Oracle PartnerNetwork, or OPN, track, but we think it will be interesting to the partner community, as well as the following session on cloud applications, which are primarily Oracle Fusion Applications, and tailoring with a partner success story.


Oracle Fusion Applications: Tailoring Your User Experience in the Cloud

Presenters: Killian Evers, Senior Director, Applications User Experience, Oracle; Timothy Dubois, User Experience Architect, Oracle; Ultan O'Broin, Director of User Experience, Oracle; Floyd Teter, EIS Technologies Inc., Fusion UX Advocate and Oracle ACE Director


Session ID: CON8493
Date: Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013
Time: 11:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Location: Moscone West - 3001


Finally, if you’re an Oracle PartnerNetwork Exchange, or OPNX, attendee, I must extend an invitation to the Apps UX Expo. The Applications User Experience (Apps UX) team is co-hosting a top-secret event. You must have signed nondisclosure paperwork on file, but it will be worth the extra step – this is a unique opportunity to see what is cooking in the research and development kitchen of the user expeirence team. You will get a chance to see innovations ranging from current technologies to future user experiences, and you’ll be able to talk to the people behind the technology and creative experiences.


For more information and to register for the Apps UX Expo, check out the OPN Blog.


Until then, the Apps UX Communications & Outreach team (OAUX) is getting ready to meet you and put our best foot forward. So the VoX blog is going be a bit quiet for the next few weeks. However, our pals Ultan and Jake always have something to say. Look for new partner-oriented posts on building great-looking usable apps on our UsableApps blog as well.


And if you see me at OpenWorld, please take a minute to say hi!



Saturday Aug 24, 2013

What’s Coming for Oracle’s Applications User Experience Customers at OpenWorld 2013

By Misha Vaughan, Director, Oracle Applications User Experience

We are literally just a few weeks away from Oracle’s biggest annual event for meeting with customers and partners from around the world. This year, the Oracle Applications User Experience (Apps UX) team is unveiling some pretty exciting things that we are very pleased to share with you.

First among our projects is an update from last year’s presentation around simplicity. We are still talking about simplicity, but we’ve added mobility and extensibility into the mix – which you can read more about in an article on UsableApps.


Simplicity: The Essential Information to Complete Your Work


OpenWorld 2013 Sessions


Apps UX Vice President Jeremy Ashley will be talking about what simplicity, mobility, and extensibility mean for Oracle’s cloud applications user experiences at his OpenWorld presentations. You can catch him here:  

CON8029: Oracle Applications User Experiences In the Cloud: Trends and Strategy

Learn how simplicity, consistency, and emerging trends are driving the applications user experience strategy at Oracle. We will talk about trends in mobile workers and their devices in the cloud, gamification, new ways to visualize information, consumer-like experiences, and how to create applications that require a light touch and zero training. See the first demos of what’s new in the pipeline for Oracle Applications user experiences here.

Date: Monday Sept 23rd
, 2013
Time: 4:45-5:45 pm

Location: Moscone West 2006/2008

If you are a customer and interested in the deeper story about tailoring technologies and tools that are available for Oracle’s cloud applications user experiences, you can find a lot more detail in this panel, which will be chaired by Killian Evers, Senior Director, and will include Tim Dubois, Architect, talking about our composer tool set. Ultan O’Broin (@ultan), Director, will talk about Apps UX design patterns and ADF tooling, and Floyd Teter (@fteter), Executive Vice President, EiS Technologies, will share a success story.

CON8493: Tailoring Your Applications User Experiences in the Cloud

Date:  Weds Sept 25th, 2013
Time: 11:45am-12:45 pm
Location: Moscone West 3001


On-Site Usability Labs

There are a few more things available for customers, including access to the Apps UX on-site Oracle Usability Labs. If you sign up to participate, you can find out what Oracle thinks the future will look like and give us your feedback about what the future should look like.  Gozel Aamoth, Manager, Applications User Experience, said that this year attendees will get a preview of products designs for:

  • Oracle Fusion HCM and SCM
  • Fusion Applications Help
  • Oracle Social Relationship Management
  • Mobile Design Patterns
  • My Oracle Support
  • Oracle Social Network
  • Oracle E-Business Suite, that's right. E-Business Suite (thank you Steven Chan & Sara Woodhull!)
  • WebCenter Portal and more

The on-site usability labs at Oracle OpenWorld

Regardless of your job title, we can offer you a session that might interest you. Here are just a few job profiles we are looking for:

  • Employees
  • Business Analysts
  • Functional Subject Matter Experts
  • Marketing professionals
  • IT professionals
  • Developers, System Administrators
  • Product Managers
  • Managers of all levels more


If you want in on one of these sessions, reach out now to angela.johnston@oracle.com. Advance registration is required, and the slots are filling up.  

Cloud Applications User Experiences: The Future of What Your Employees Will Touch, See, & Hear

Check out our demopod this year at OpenWorld and take the chance to try out the new simplified user experience first-hand. You will also have an opportunity to chat about what’s happening with mobile design. 

Get on the Bus!

If you're staying through Thursday, Sept. 26, sign up for one of Oracle’s exclusive tours at Oracle Headquarters in Redwood Shores, California.  Customers and partners are invited to hop on 
one of our chartered buses to Oracle Headquarters to see where Oracle brings together best practices to create innovative, next-generation user experiences.


The Oracle Usability Lab Tour Bus

Our usability experts will demonstrate an eye-tracking device, how Oracle’s usability experts use an interactive SMART board, and show the latest design concepts for mobile enterprise applications on different mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets.

Round-trip transportation will be provided from the InterContinental Hotel in San Francisco to Oracle Headquarters.  Return times are estimated, depending on traffic.  Advanced sign-up is recommended, and spaces will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

To join a tour, register here.  For additional questions, email gozel.aamoth@oracle.com.

Friday Aug 16, 2013

Emerging Design Principles for End User Consumption of Big Data

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

Editor’s Note: This is part 3 in a three-part series on the user experiences of working with big data. In the last post on this topic, John Fuller, Consulting User Experience Designer for Endeca, wrote about some of his team’s key requirements for designing usability into the user interfaces for Endeca Information Discovery. In this post, the emerging thinking on design principles for delivering all this power to regular end users is the topic. Thank you to peers John Fuller, Julia Blyumen, Edward Roske (@eroske), and Aylin Uysal for the inspiration of these themes.

Information visualization is a whole field unto itself, and education is now widely available on this topic, notably Edward Tufte’s work on Information Visualization.

When information visualization was discussed at a recent summit on user experience for big data summit, a specific new insight for me was that I saw a set of information visualization guidelines emerging for end users. I don’t mean data analysts or business analysts who are doing deep, big data analysis.  I mean the end user, for whom the analyst is preparing data.  

How do you present big data to an executive or a decision-maker in a way that is digestible? How do you take them from the big picture insight, down into the supporting details? Do you show them the trellis charts and say “see here?” Or do you take a more narrative approach?

In no particular order, these were my lessons learned about end user design principles for big data visualizations:

1.    Make the invisible visible.

The entry into a big data analysis can be through seemingly simple information visualizations. Take a strategy from the newspaper industry’s use of infographics, such as the Huffington Post or USA Today.  Through visualization, you can help the user better connect and interact with the data.  Information visualization and infographics are a core part of making the results of big data accessible.

2. Show the forest, then the trees. This is also known as progressive disclosure.

With more and more data available in larger amounts, end users now need, more than ever, attention to how to cleverly and conveniently discover what they need to know. Then they need to be given the ability to explore that data.

3.  It’s all about me, or staying in context of my task.

Making big data relevant to end users means considering how to display large quantities of data in the context of different enterprise use cases, such as human resources processes, financial processes, or sales processes.  This can be any kind of data, whether it's pulling in transactional data, analytics, or social feeds.

4. Tell me a story.

Big data is, well, a lot of data. Providing narrative sources can add context and clarity to complex data. Doing this in a systematized way has even more interesting implications for enterprise use cases.

5. Make it mobile.

This one is kind of a no-brainer.  This is about giving end users the ability to make this kind of data available on tablet-sized devices.

6.  I can trust this, by you showing me how you got here.

Because of the complexity of the data, and the possible multiplicity of data sources, the ability to create confidence in the quality and the timeliness of the data are key to the experience.  It also means showing the path or way an analyst arrived at a particular conclusion.

7. Make it fun to play with.

One of the delightful characteristics of big data is that there really is a lot of data you can play with.  There is a sweet spot for the developer or designer who invents clever components that allow for the creative display and manipulation of complex levels of data.

8. One UI to rule them all.

End users don’t really care how many data sources you are bringing together. They just want the result. The best experiences will unify many data sources, transparently --  whether it’s Endeca, a data warehouse, or social feeds -- into one representation.

Again, I can’t claim credit for the concepts. I’m just summarizing what I learned on that day. If you want to see what this all means for Oracle Applications User Experiences, stay tuned and see what’s coming at OpenWorld 2013 this year.

Tuesday Jul 30, 2013

Key User Experience Design Principles for working with Big Data

By John Fuller, Consulting User Experience Designer, Oracle

Editor’s Note: This is part 2  in a three-part blog series on the user experiences of working with big data. In my last blog on this topic, I summarized the conversation from a one-day summit with a few key partners on the user experience landscape with big data.  In this blog, John Fuller, full time interaction designer for Endeca, shares some of his team’s key requirements for designing usability into the user interfaces for Endeca Information Discovery.

John Fuller
John Fuller, Consulting User Experience Designer for Endeca

About two years ago, we took look at the product we had and felt that there was a lot of opportunity that was, in many ways, fairly unique in the marketplace. It was at that point that we developed a set of core design principles to guide us in our work going forward.

We crystalized the things we thought were working well and sought to maintain that focus going forward. I wouldn't say that they were designed specifically with "big data" as the main focus; the principles are much more broadly applicable. We're focusing on helping people bring together a variety of data types in a fast and flexible way with lower cost, so from that perspective, we're targeting a really interesting part of the big data story.


Endeca healthcare demo
Screen shot from an Oracle Endeca Healthcare Demo showing how big data can guide the detection of healthcare problems.

We came up with 6 core design principles and details about what each one meant. One of the really interesting outcomes of this has been that the principles have really held up over time.

Here are the six core principles:
  1. Enhance Insight - The value of discovery tools lies in the insights they help discovery workers realize, by enhancing the natural ability of people to understand the answers that are in the data.
  2. Encourage Exploration - Discovery applications encourage exploration.  Users will want to ask new questions, pursue new avenues of exploration, and consider new connections and relationships across the diverse types of information presented by discovery applications.
  3. Coherence and Clarity - All elements of the experience should work together in a coordinated fashion. The way the system works is clear at all levels, making the results and implications of actions easy to understand.
  4. Readily Composable and Manageable - Creating, configuring, and managing discovery applications is straightforward and efficient. The product provides useful defaults, intelligent starting points, and encourages application builders to make good choices when composing discovery applications.
  5. Engaging and Compelling - Working with the tool is enjoyable, engaging, and satisfying, for new and veteran users. Endeca Information Discovery embodies and personifies the values and principles identified herein.
  6. Offer a Modern Application Experience - Discovery solutions “walk and “talk” like modern applications.
With every new project that comes up, the principles still seem new and fresh -- with new takeaways to guide the process. We're planning on adding more detail about the principles -- and several other topics -- on our blog, so if you'd like to hear more, check it out.


Tuesday Jul 23, 2013

The User Experience of Big Data in Oracle Enterprise Applications: Part 1 of 3

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

Editor’s Note: This is the first part of a three-part series on lessons we have learned about the user experience of big data, and trends in Oracle’s approach to the challenges of working with big data.

Misha Vaughan
Misha Vaughan, Director, Communications & Outreach, Applications User Expeirence
by Martin Taylor

I recently hosted a partner summit on the user experiences of big data at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, Calif. The title of the summit was: “So You Have Big Data, Now What?”

The goals of the exchange were three-fold:
  • Assess where some key Oracle user experience partners -- Floyd Teter of EiS Technologies (@fteter), Edward Roske of interRel (@eroske), Mike Rulf of Core Services, and Ron Batra of AT&T (@ronbatra)-- were at in their conversations around the user experience needs of big data with their customers.
  • Discuss and sharpen our common understanding of the UX value propositions of some Oracle applications for big data. My particular interest was with OBIEE’s new information visualizations and Endeca Information Discovery’s UX.
  • Get feedback on a selection of forward-looking applications user experience innovation projects that intersect with big data. 
Below are my lessons learned from the conversation. Part 2, the next post in this series, is an email conversation with John Fuller, User Experience Designer for Endeca, on the key elements of designing user experiences for data analysts working with big data tools. Part 3 is a summary of what I see as the key UX design principles emerging in Oracle for a new class of design problems - making big data accessible to non-data analysts.

My Lessons Learned

Lesson 1: What customers are asking about “big data” and how they defining “big data”.

The general consensus was that some customers have already defined their strategy and are moving forward.  However, many customers are still trying to wrap their heads around what big data means for their institutions.  Our key partners see their customers’ understandings ranging across the following:
•    Big data is a massively large volume of structured data.
•    Big data is making sense of unstructured data, like Twitter feeds and Google search results (e.g., monitoring potential flu outbreaks).
•    Big data is about consolidating multiple sources of data, structured and unstructured, into one representation.
•    Big data is about solving wicked problems, for example, how to optimize something as complex as thinning a forest against needed output, aesthetics, and uncertain markets.
•    It is about discovering unlikely relationships in a large volume of data.

Lesson 2:  The big-data analyst is a highly specialized user role, and really needs the right user experience to be able to deliver the results companies are looking for.

Companies like Oracle are building the tools necessary for data analysts, such as Endeca's Information Discovery Tool.  Color me "wow" after seeing a demo by John Fuller.  Important tools in the toolkit are also OBIEE's "big data" visual analysis tools (thank you, Edward Roske).

This was a jam-packed conversation, and had so much in it that I decided to follow up with John and see if he would unpack the user experience requirements in more detail in a follow-up post. So stay tuned for that.

Lesson 3: It seems that there are really two user profiles we need to be concerned with in big data: the data analyst and the downstream producer, or possibly business analyst.

A recent study in the Wall Street Journal states that one of the biggest challenges of big data is finding professionals actually trained in the domain to help companies take advantage of this space. We know that the big business schools with IT programs will take the bait, but even that will not produce them fast enough. The rate of information is growing faster than our ability to sift it.

To take advantage of the sizeable investment required for a Big Data Project, a data analyst needs to enable a larger set of producers to leverage their data and share it with a larger audience. This may be a business analyst, or some other job title - but essentially this is a person who works with a lead data analyst to create the stories, visualizations, and associated analyses needed to communicate findings to a larger audience, which allows that lead analyst to get onto the next problem.

In my next post, I’ll write about Endeca, and the key elements of designing user experiences for data analysts working with big data tools.





Saturday Jun 15, 2013

Hands-On Workshop with Fusion Applications and ADF UX Desktop Design Patterns

By Misha Vaughan, Applications User Experience

Oracle Fusion Applications

I hosted a team of internal Oracle Fusion Apps Sales leaders and a few select Oracle partners on May 14-16, 2013, at Oracle HQ in Redwood Shores. This was the second version of the Applications User Experience team’s "How to Build Great-Looking Usable Apps" workshop.  

This was a revised version of an event we piloted a few months before in the UK. This time around, we added:
  • A couple of bridge-building pieces to help attendees move from wireframe to design patterns to ADF components more clearly.
  • A day on mobile UX design patterns and mobile ADF.
Attendees want to attend this workshop for one of two reasons: 1) They need to extend Fusion Apps, and they want to understand what the UX best practices are for doing this, 2) they want to build a custom application, or even just a page, with ADF, and they don't want to start from scratch on the user experience.

To give you an idea of the agenda, here are the key speakers and their areas of focus:
  • Ultan O'Broin (@ultan, @usableapps): Focusing on the enterprise applications UX design principles, defining what "UX design patterns" are, and explaining why wireframing is such a key part of Oracle’s UX design pattern strategy.
  • Misha Vaughan: I was standing in for my team member Katy Massucco on a presentation she calls "art school in a box," or the 8 things any developer needs to know about the visual design of enterprise UIs.
  • Scott Robinson: On how we move step-by-step from wireframes to UX desktop design patterns, as well as the design guidance we are developing for identifying "simplified" use cases for enterprise apps.
  • Lynn Munsinger: On all of the hands-on content. She is really walking attendees through two very thorough exercises, on Procurement and on a trouble-ticket flow, as well as a great presentation on how to move from screenshots to ADF components.  
  • Richard Bingham (@richardbingham): Detailing how we make use of composers as part of the Fusion Apps tailoring story, as well as covering his new role in Fusion Apps Developer relations.
  • Floyd Teter (@fteter) : On how he used UX design patterns and ADF Essentials to bootstrap his UX and deliver a well-designed product ridiculously fast.
  • Mark Vilrokx: He is exploring use cases and technology for integrating with Fusion apps in the cloud.
  • Kristin Desmond: On the new simplified UI's tailoring strategy for Fusion Apps and where we are with UX design patterns for simplified UIs.
  • Lynn Rampoldi-Hnilo: Covering a great set of "top 10" things you need to know for designing mobile applications as well as shepherding attendees through wireframing a mobile application.
  • Brent White: On the visual design guidance for mobile UIs, as well as teaming up with Lynn on wireframing.
  • Joe Huang: On how ADF Mobile is built to support UX design patterns and deliver a great mobile user experience.
  • Teena Singh and Lulit Bezuayehu: On how a developer can write a user profile and learn to run his or her own usability test using resources from UX Direct.
I think you know why I felt so tired by the end of the week. We hit a lot. Most of this agenda came from the combined brain power of Ultan O'Broin and Lynn Munsinger. So it's ironic that Ultan could not even attend. He managed to take a very nasty nose-dive over his bicycle handle bars the Sunday before the event.

Thanks very much to Jeremy Ashley, my boss, for stepping in to present as well as Scott Robinson for biting off more than he expected in this portion of the workshop.

So, how did we do?
See for yourself:

Floyd Teter, EiS Technologies: "Great workshop. Covered stuff I can take back to the job and use."  


Sten Vesterli, Scott/Tiger: He clearly got the value of design patterns. "I was just watching my son play the Neverwinter MMORPG beta. The user interface looks just like other MMORPGs and he could jump right in and start playing.

That’s not because the people at Cryptic Studios lack imagination - it’s because their users already have an expectation of how an MMORPG should look. It would be stupid to risk turning people away by inventing a brand new user experience (UX). Instead, they are using a User Experience Design Pattern that their users recognize."


Floyd Teter, Sten Vesterli, Mick McGee
Floyd Teter, EiS Technologies; Sten Vesterli, Scott/Tiger; and Mick McGee, EchoUser.

How do you get access to this?
We were fortunate enough to have Tom Barrett and Jonathan Vinoskey from Oracle Alliances & Channels (A&C) representing Oracle Applications partner interests.  They stayed the full 3 days!  Talk about troupers.

Jonathan Vinoskey, Tom Barrett
Jonathan Vinoskey & Tom Barrett, Oracle, creating a wireframe for a trouble-ticket application.

I have been working with our key speakers and A&C on the best ways to re-deliver this content.  Right now, we are looking at a series of in-person training events that we are planning to offer globally -- not a huge number of them, as the guidance has been that attendees get the most out of having access to the seasoned UX pros, but hopefully enough for the really eager to get started with design patterns and ADF.  We will also be offering a series of these sessions as recordings, as an OPN learning path.

You can also expect to see excerpts from the workshop on the UsableApps blog in the months ahead.



Tuesday May 28, 2013

100 Partners Later

By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience

The Oracle Applications User Experience team just did something new, and it was very cool.

The customer outreach arm of the Applications User Experience, or Apps UX, team held its first demo reception.

The team has done demos before. And new stuff. After all, this is a research and development organization within Oracle. It’s our job to be ahead of the market and in the midst of designing new user experiences with equal parts cutting-edge technology and creative innovation. So why was this different?

You may have read in a previous post here about simplicity, and how that idea is driving the Oracle applications user experience forward. In May, we showed that idea in action, with demos of several special user experiences actually undergoing development right now. Only previously vetted partners were allowed to see this – as a rule, Oracle does not share much before an application becomes generally available. So being able to share something that was actually in development just for the sake of showing it, well, that was quite exciting.

Aylin Uysal
Photographs by Martin Taylor, Oracle Applications User Experience

Aylin Uysal, Director, Applications User Experience, demonstrates the new simplified UI.


Gathering feedback on iterations of the next generation of an application is part of the Apps UX mission. The team tests and measures and re-tests next-generation designs for enterprise software, gathers up the comments and reactions of specifically recruited users, and figures out how to solve problems with each iteration of the next use experience design. This often happens in one-on-one customer feedback sessions, or occasionally, a focus group.

But in May, about 100 partners were invited to a special reception, just to see what we’re working on.

Mark Vilrokx
Mark Vilrokx, Architect, Applications User Experience, shows how Oracle Voice works.


Sten Vesterli, a
Senior Principal Consultant with Scott/Tiger and Oracle ACE Director, posted in his blog that he had seen the future of ERP. Vesterli wrote: “Yesterday, the Oracle UX team hosted a confidential (strictly no photography!) event demoing some of the new stuff they are working on. If I told you the details I’d have to kill you, but what I can say is this: The future of ERP is as a platform, not an application.”

Floyd Teter, Executive Vice-President, Strategy and Products, EiS Technologies, Inc., also posted in his blog that he "had the opportunity to see plenty of new product prototypes ... none of which I can talk about (inserted frustrated sigh here) other than to say that there is some extremely cool stuff in the pipeline from the Oracle UX team.  Seems like this team's innovation engine is really taking their game up another notch."

This is an adventurous time for the Apps UX team. We’re always looking forward, but with the addition of new developers to our team in the last year, we’re moving forward at a spectacular pace. We’ll keep writing about it here on VoX, so check back frequently.

For a broad view of some of the areas the team is exploring, read this recent post about the road ahead.
To find out where members of the Apps UX team will be speaking next, check the Usable Apps Events page.

Wednesday May 15, 2013

Oracle Apps UX Team on the Road: What Are We Offering at OHUG Global Conference 2013?

By Gozel Aamoth, Oracle Applications User Experience 

If you have read previous “On The Road” blog posts, you may know that the Applications User Experience (Apps UX) team has been travelling all over the world in the last few months. Team members have attended and presented at Alliance 2013 in Indianapolis, IN; OBUG Benelux Connect 2013 in Antwerp, Belgium; and COLLABORATE 2013 in Denver, CO. Our team had a colossal experience at these Oracle User Group conferences: We met Oracle customers and partners who were eager to collaborate with Oracle usability experts and provide feedback on future design trends, participate in an interactive eye-tracking demo, discover the new simplified user interface (UI) for Oracle Fusion Applications, and learn more about enterprise and mobile design patterns.

While some team members are working on incorporating valuable feedback that Oracle usability experts received at these conferences, others are preparing to present and demo new designs at the upcoming OHUG Global Conference 2013 in Dallas, Texas, on June 10-14.  Oracle HCM User Group (OHUG) is an organization devoted to providing HCM, or human capital management, users with valuable insight into Oracle, E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft, Fusion HCM, and Taleo applications.

If you or your colleagues plan to attend the OHUG conference this year, you might be interested to learn what the Apps UX team will offer at this event. There are several ways to meet face-to-face with members of the Applications User Experience team: participate in one of the user feedback sessions; visit our demo pod to learn more about the new simplified user experience for Oracle Fusion Applications; or attend an Apps UX presentation, which you can read about on the Usable Apps Events page.

Onsite Usability Lab: Give us your feedback, and get involved

Oracle customers and partners who plan to attend OHUG or are local to the Dallas area are invited to participate in a usability feedback session. By participating in this activity, you will gain knowledge about new functionality directly from the source and ultimately influence the direction of the Oracle HCM products. 
  • Give us your feedback: We are looking for Employees and Managers of all levels to provide feedback on Fusion HCM Time Entry, Online Employee Directory, Manager Dashboard; and PeopleSoft Mobile Absence Management, PeopleSoft Mobile Approvals, Voice Interactions and Gamification in Enterprise applications.
  • When and where: Sessions will be scheduled on Tuesday, June 11, and Wednesday, June 12, at the Sheraton Downtown Dallas Hotel in Dallas, Texas. You may sign up to participate in a one-on-one session or a brainstorming group activity.
  • Get involved: This event fills up quickly, and seats are limited. Advance registration is required. RSVP now by sending an email to Jeannette Chadwick at jeannette.chadwick@oracle.com.

Jeanette Chadwick
Jeannette Chadwick from the Oracle Applications User Experience team welcomes participants as they arrive to participate in user feedback sessions.

Demo Station: The new entry experience for Oracle Fusion Applications, mobile, design patterns, and more

Are you looking for a simple, current, and productive way for your users to perform key, quick-entry tasks while still having direct access to the full Oracle Fusion Applications functionality? Stop by the Oracle Applications User Experience demo station at OHUG 2013 and discover the new entry experience for Oracle Fusion Applications.

The Applications User Experience team will also show the latest design concepts for mobile enterprise applications on different mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. Having the right mobile applications for your workforce enhances productivity, efficiency, and employee morale and satisfaction. Discuss the similarities, differences, advantages, and challenges of the mobile platform. Chat with us about how these applications and prototypes meet your needs. 

Topics:

  • Experience the new simplified UI for Oracle Fusion Applications
  • Discover the latest mobile design concepts
  • See how Oracle uses design patterns and guidelines to promote standardization and consistency in applications

eye tracker
John Roger, from the Oracle Applications User Experience team, right, conducts an eye-tracking study with a demopod visitor at COLLABORATE 2013.

Attend this presentation to learn about the Oracle User Experience strategy

The Oracle Applications User Experience team will be offering a presentation session at OHUG 2013 that offers a look at the strategy behind the Oracle user experience, and provides a look ahead at where the user experience is going. Visit the Usable Apps Events page to find out when and where this presentation will be held.

Topic: Oracle’s Roadmap to a Simple, Modern User Experience in Fusion Applications

Presenter: Aylin Uysal, Director, Human Capital Management User Experience


Wednesday Apr 17, 2013

Stay on Top of the Latest Trends in Enterprise User Experiences


By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experiences

Find your local expert in:

Dubai | Cyprus | Athens | Johannesburg  | Jordan | Prague | Moscow | Doha | Bucharest | Abu Dhabi | Munich | London | Gothenburg | Brussels | Copenhagen | Utrecht | Chicago | San Francisco | Washington DC


Photographs by Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience
Amsterdam canals, above, were outside the location for a recent workshop on enterprise applications user experience. 

In the fall of last year, the Apps UX team met with and updated the Apps UX Sales Ambassador (SAMBA) team in North America with a reprise of last year’s sales training event.

The SAMBA team is a global group of senior-level application solution consultants and applications technologists who provide front-line feedback on the Oracle applications user experience strategy and roadmap. We now officially welcome to the fold representation from Oracle’s Partner team, Alliances and Channels, as well.

Their brethren in Europe, Middle East, and Africa also wanted a chance to see and give feedback on what's new, what's coming, and what is officially "wow" in applications user experiences.  So we took our workshop on the road to create more regional user experience experts.


The new Oracle University training facility in Dubai, near where more UX training was conducted. Highly recommended!

What did they learn?
There was a significant focus on the Oracle Fusion Applications next-generation user experiences, with an in-depth discussion of the new simplified user interface, updates to the desktop user interface, as well as the role of Fusion's native applications.  There was also an extended conversation about how this frames Oracle's overall cloud user experience strategy.

Attendees also got a much more detailed view into how these innovations are spread across the Applications Unlimited product lines, such as E-Business Suite, Siebel, JD Edwards, and PeopleSoft. We offered specific examples of how Oracle invests in codifying proven, tested solutions to usability problems, known as user experience design patterns,  that any existing product can family leverage.



Ultan O'Broin, Director, Applications User Experiences, discusses how user experience design patterns allow developers to leverage Oracle innovations across applications products.


Finally, the main event: The applications user experience roadmap with Jeremy Ashley, Vice President of the Apps UX team. What are the next set of big ideas that we are paying attention to and doing research and development around? 

You can get an inkling of the conversation here. Both presenters and attendees debated the merits and risks of simplification, gamification, voice technology, and how to create frameworks for extending these platforms to tailor a user experience to the way a customer's business really needs to function.


Lynn Rampoldi-Hnilo, Director, Mobile User Experience, talks about voice integration for end users of enterprise applications.

Special Thanks
Special thanks to Kevin Li, Edward Dewolf and Julian Peters from Europe, and Anand Subramanian from Middle East and Africa, for serving as our spirit guides, and teaching us what you need for your customers and partners. 


Julian Peters, Master Principal Sales Consultant, UK


Anand Subramanian, Middle East and Africa Fusion Apps Leader, Dubai


Edward Dewolf, Principal Sales Consultant, Belgium

A last thank you to Andrew Gilmour for staying calm under pressure to help execute an awesome series of workshops.


Andrew Gilmour, Fusion User Experience Advocates and Apps UX Sales Ambassador Programs

For customers and partners
If you are interested in a briefing and want to stay on top of what's coming in applications user experiences, connect with your local solution consultant or alliances and channels representative -- they will reach out to our Apps UX Sales Ambassadors and can deliver an update for you. 

If you are fortunate enough to find your way to a local user group event, we try to make sure we have a representative from our team on the ground.  Check out our events pages on the UsableApps Web site.

Thursday Apr 11, 2013

The Cloud User Experience: Changing Everything for Users

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

Cloud-delivered applications are one of those things you watch to see how the  phenomenon is going to fully express itself.  It’s one of those industry-wide happenings, perhaps even more compelling than tablet computers, that is making the world a better place for users.

Consumers have already seen the benefit of a cloud approach with tailored, consumer-driven experiences on sites like eBay.  



Whether it’s using a desktop user interface (UI) with powerful features such as a merchant user interface for uploading 100 long and short descriptions and photos, or a simplified UI on a tablet for browsing through items from the comfort of your couch, or monitoring an auction on your smart phone using a native application, these custom, tailored experiences are really enabled by cloud computing.  

Think about that. These user interfaces are tailored for what you are doing, on specific devices, and considering specific contexts of use. Add to that a consumer-level design aesthetic, and industrial-grade security, and you have the makings of a pleasant little revolution for enterprise users.


Enterprise Apps in the Cloud Should Work the Way You Do

Marry ease-of-use, device-savvy design, custom-fit experiences, role-based access, international compliance, and security -- that’s a heady combination. It means that users can and should expect their cloud-delivered solutions to work the way they need.

Let me give you some examples.  If I am a VP of sales, I am likely very mobile and use a simplified UI on a tablet quite a bit to browse and analyze my pipeline on the road.  But if I need to sit down and crank out a deeper level of analysis for territory modeling, I am only going to do that from the comfort of a delightfully wide screen on a desktop UI.  If I am dashing from a customer meeting to the airport, I want a quick user interface via a native application on my smartphone to capture only essential information.



If I am a general ledger clerk, I probably need access to a large-screen user interface.  In fact, if you try to make me do my day-to-day work on a tablet, I would likely smack you with it.  But I may be perfectly happy submitting my vacation schedule from a tablet-kiosk in the lunchroom.

It’s a pretty exciting time of change in enterprise software right now, and I am a big fan of these kinds of changes.  It means that our end users will only benefit.  Stay tuned to the Voice of User Experience (VoX) blog to hear more about some of the new stuff coming from Oracle.  


Tuesday Apr 02, 2013

Introduce Design Thinking Into Your Enterprise Implementations

By Madhuri Kolhatkar, Oracle Applications User Experience

Enterprise applications are often critiqued for being too complex and difficult to use. But if one can understand the customer journey that post-sales enterprise implementations go through, such as configuration, customizations, and extensions, then it is not hard to understand how the design focus is lost. Enterprise implementations are typically technology-focused. Consultants and IT professionals deliver what is required by the business, but end users often experience an application that does not meet their needs in terms of user experience.

Oracle’s Applications User Experience team incorporates user-centered design process into our shipped products. Our customers often tailor these enterprise solutions to fit their needs. If our customers used our user-centered design thinking in the implementation, the result of their tailored implementation is far more likely to result in more productive users, and deliver the efficiency everyone wants with a new enterprise solution.

To meet this goal, the Oracle Applications User Experience team has created a program called Oracle UX Direct to provide customers, partners, and consultants in the enterprise industry with design best-practices and tools that they can leverage to make their enterprise implementations more successful. By introducing design thinking during the implementation stage, our customers have the opportunity to create a solution that best fits the needs of their users from the beginning.

UX Direct Home Page
Visit the UX Direct website to learn how to make your implementation more usable and productive for your users.

Just to illustrate the benefits of introducing design thinking into an implementation, I want to share a story from one of my experiences working with customers. An international organization had implemented Oracle’s recruitment application for Human Capital Management to increase their global workforce. They converted their 50-page, paper-based, new-hire application to an online form collecting detailed personal information. However, no one was using the application, and there were no submissions from applicants, even in a downturn economy. The customer requested our support to investigate why the product was not successful.

After conducting some user research with both internal and external employees, we found that a lot of questions asked in the online form were not applicable to an applicant. We went through an exercise with the users to prioritize and define the key fields they used and we redesigned the user experience based on what the users actually wanted. The result was astonishing. Resumes flooded the human resources department. This was the result of following a user-centered design process.

Madhuri Kolhatkar
Madhuri Kolhatkar, Senior Director

Our program, UX Direct, tells you how to introduce a user-centered design approach into your implementation. You can use our step-by-step design process to add design thinking into your development process. We also provide a useful tool kit and showcase best practices to inform your designs. 

We plan to extend and refine this repository of information and create a community that will change the way enterprise applications are implemented. Check out what our partners and consultants are already saying about UX Direct in VoX, where you will also see new additions to the UX Direct website.

Friday Mar 15, 2013

Oracle Apps UX Team on the Road: What Are We Offering at COLLABORATE 2013?

By Gozel Aamoth, Oracle Applications User Experience

The Oracle Applications User Experience team (Apps UX) will be at the Alliance Higher Education User Group (HEUG) conference in Indianapolis, Indiana, and OBUG Benelux Connect in Antwerp, Belgium, in the month of March. Team members meet and collaborate with Oracle customers and partners at these events, as well as expand existing relationships. If you’re not planning to attend either of these user group conferences, in April you can meet us at the COLLABORATE 2013 conference in Denver, Colorado.

APPS UX AT COLLABORATE

Photograph by the Oracle Applications User Experience team

Angela Johnston, from left, Teena Singh and Tejas Peesapati from the Oracle Applications User Experience Team host the UX Lab at Collaborate 2012 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The COLLABORATE conference is an event where thousands of Oracle professionals spend days learning about new Oracle products and offerings. There is a lot to choose from, but the Apps UX team always brings something innovative and new to the table. Depending on what you’d like to see or how you’d like to get involved, there are several ways to meet face-to-face with members of the Applications User Experience team: sign up for a user feedback session, where you get the opportunity to explore new ideas and see early designs of future products by test-driving the product before it goes to market; visit our demo pod to learn more about the new entry experience for Oracle Fusion Applications and participate in our very cool interactive eye-tracking demo; or attend one of the Apps UX presentations, which you can read about on the Usable Apps Events page.

Onsite Usability Lab: Participate in a user feedback session

Oracle customers and partners are invited to participate in a usability feedback session, where we will test new interfaces and features for the Oracle Fusion Applications HCM entry experience and work flows that have been gamified; Fusion Applications Help; the entry experience for Fusion Applications Financial Reporting; Oracle Social Network; and Oracle E-Business Suite user experience and interactions. Get a peek at Oracle’s next-generation enterprise application designs and learn about Oracle’s pioneering user-centered design process. Your feedback will help Oracle develop unbeatable products and solutions.

  • Who can participate? Employees, functional subject matter experts, managers, directors, VPs, Fusion Early Adopters, Fusion Applications implementers, IT consultants, partners and more.
  • When and where: Sessions will be scheduled on Tuesday, April 9th,  and Wednesday, April 10th, at the Hyatt Regency Denver Hotel  in Denver, Colorado. You may sign up to participate in a one-on-one session or a brainstorming group activity.
  • How do I sign up? If you are interested in participating or would like to recommend your colleagues, send an email to gozel.aamoth@oracle.com

Demo Station: The new entry experience for Oracle Fusion Applications, mobile, design patterns, and eye-tracking

Are you looking for a simple, current, and productive way for your users to perform key, quick-entry tasks while still having direct access to the full Oracle Fusion Applications functionality? Stop by the Oracle Applications User Experience demo station at COLLABORATE 2013 and discover the new entry experience for Oracle Fusion Applications. 

The Applications User Experience team will also show the latest design concepts for mobile enterprise applications on different mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. Having the right mobile applications for your workforce enhances productivity, efficiency, and employee morale and satisfaction. Discuss the similarities, differences, advantages, and challenges of the mobile platform. Chat with us about how these applications and prototypes meet your needs. 

Our team also wants to show you how using both enterprise and mobile design patterns in your customizations can extend the value of your applications, while also promoting standardization and consistency. 

And, get a look at the cutting-edge tools in Oracle’s arsenal of usability evaluation methods, such as eye-tracking. Recording users’ visual attention with eye-tracking methods can help inform the visibility, understandability, and navigation of page elements. Discuss with us how metrics are defined, and how design implications are made.

Attend our presentations to learn about the Oracle User Experience strategy

The Oracle Applications User Experience team will be offering several sessions at COLLABORATE 2013 that offer a look at the strategy behind the Oracle user experience, and provide a look ahead at where the user experience is going. Visit the Usable Apps COLLABORATE 2013 page to find out when and where these presentations will be held.

  • Oracle’s Roadmap to a Simple, Modern User Experience In Fusion Apps
  • Fusion User Experience for Today's Enterprise User
  • Oracle Fusion Applications: Customizing and Extending Using Oracle Composers


Wednesday Mar 06, 2013

Oracle Executive Spends Four Weeks with Just a Mini

By Misha Vaughan, Oracle Applications User Experience

Steven Chan
Steven Chan, Senior Director, Oracle E-business Suite Applications Technology, holds his iPad mini.

As Oracle continues to develop its strategy in the mobile space, it’s always interesting to hear what Oracle executives are doing and thinking around available mobile devices.  

Steven Chan, Oracle Senior Director of E-Business Suite Technology and a regular blogger, recently traveled around the world in about 30 days with only an iPad mini. He went from the U.K. to Hyderabad, India, to Hong Kong and Shenzhen in China, all in about four weeks.  

Why bring just a mini? His number one concern: security.  How could he keep his computing device physically safe, given such a wide range of locales and conditions? “I could slip it in my suit pocket. This was my primary reason to take my mini instead of my regular iPad,” Chan said. “I could keep it with me at all times.”

He said he thought that he would miss his laptop. “I expected it be painful,” Chan said. “I expected the smaller form factor to be difficult to adjust to, but it was surprisingly easy. I was worried about the ‘squint factor,’ but that turned out not to be an issue.”

In contrast to an iPad mini,  “You have to make a deliberate choice to carry an iPad around with you. This is tricky for guys, and I personally don’t like to carry a murse or briefcase all day.”

He said the smaller size made a big difference when reading books or using it for extended periods.  “I read a couple of books a week, and you really feel the extra weight [of the larger iPad] after a while. When I picked up a mini the first time, my reaction was, ‘This is the device I’ve been waiting for!’” 




Photograph by Martin Taylor, Oracle Applications User Experience

What surprises were there with this device?

“The unexpected business benefits,” Chan said. “In the middle of a conversation with a customer, I could show them a technical road map. They didn’t know I was carrying it. All of a sudden, we can have a different conversation at a deeper level because I have more detailed information with me.”

He also found that having easy access to email was helpful. “Our lives are in email,” he said. “You can keep an email stored on the mini, which is really something. I have a terrible memory; that’s why I write my blog. But not everything makes it to the blog. There is lots of internal stuff: technical debates, contents of new release patch sets. So having my email handy offline allowed me to have certain conversations straight away, instead of saying, ‘Let me get back to you later after I return to my office.’”

Having the iPad mini with him at all times also helped him to be more efficient. “At the UKOUG conference, I had a standing-room-only session,” he said. “At the end, someone came up and asked me if the slides were going to be available. I said, ‘Hang on’ and sent it to him right there. One less thing to do later.” Chan also remarked on the difference between an iPhone and an iPad mini. “Sending a business-caliber e-mail on an iPhone is tedious. The mini is just easier to use for that level of written communication.”

Chan said he’s also been using features he hasn’t tried before. “I’m using the ‘voice dictation’ button with everything now,” he said, “composing emails, sending texts, searches in Safari, creating new calendar entries. I hadn’t used that before.” He tried it because the iPad mini’s portrait-mode keyboard is smaller. “The requirement for greater precision while typing on it is just enough of a disincentive that I now prefer to simply talk instead of type,” he said. “I talk faster than I type, so I’m finding that my data-input rate has increased instead of decreased.” 

That surprised him: “This is completely counter-intuitive. Am I the only one?” he said. “If others are doing the same, then it makes me wonder whether our use of natural language voice input will increase as form factors shrink further.”

How could the iPad mini change things for enterprise users?

When Chan was on the road, he found that he spent his time approving requisitions and handling other administrative transactions -- basically a lot of approvals. He wanted some specific capabilities on the road.  “I would love a nice native app for expense reports,” he said. Oracle ACE Director and Fusion Applications UX Advocate Debra Lilley showed him the Fusion mobile expenses application.  “I want this!” he said.

“An Accounts Payables clerk isn’t going to use a mobile device to enter transactions. Executive users are the ones who use these devices on the road. Fit and finish matter to executives,” Chan said. “We need beautifully-designed mobile apps. Mobile apps have to look dazzling; they need a certain polish. You can immediately tell the difference between an app designed for iOS and one that’s been ported.”

What does this mean for Oracle E-Business Suite? Chan said, “You can bet that this means we are looking at mobile computing beyond just running EBS in a tablet browser. We are looking at how work is changing because of these devices. We have some exciting things in the EBS labs right now.” 

If you are interested in seeing where Oracle Applications are trending, check out the Applications sessions at Alliance, Benelux, and Collaborate, and sign up for a usability testing session at Alliance, Benelux, or Collaborate to help guide the design of our mobile applications.

About

Check here for news and upcoming events from Oracle's Applications User Experience team on the Oracle Applications Cloud and more.

Misha Vaughan
Misha Vaughan, Director, Applications User Experience
@mishavaughan on Twitter

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