Saturday Jan 28, 2012

Leveraging Infiniband to bypass the BRIDGE

As Deepak mentioned in the previous post, the Tuxedo team has spent a lot of effort in leveraging some of the unique features of the Exalogic platform.  Specifically we've developed support for Remote Direct Memory Access.  This is a feature of Infiniband that allows one node to read or write directly into the memory of another node.  In particular this can all be done from user mode, meaning there is no need to enter the operating system kernel to pass information from one node to another node.

Tuxedo 11gR1PS2 uses this RDMA capability to bypass the BRIDGE process used in a Tuxedo cluster (MP mode domain.)  In standard hardware environments, when a request is made to a server on a remote node, the request is given to the BRIDGE which in turn passes the request to the remote BRIDGE which eventually places the request on the appropriate server's queue.  The reply message takes the reverse path being placed on the local BRIDGE queue, relayed to the remote BRIDGE by a network connection, and then finally placed on the client's reply queue.  In some cases this becomes a bottleneck as the BRIDGE is only partially multi-threaded.  So on high core count systems with a lot of requests being made to remote servers, the BRIDGE creates a throughput bottleneck.  As well the BRIDGE introduces substantial latency as the total round trip requires 4 System V IPC messages and two network messages.  Where a local request/response can be performed in about 35 microseconds, a remote request/response through the BRIDGE can take about 1100 microseconds.  This diagram shows the message flow:


With the BRIDGE bypass feature, a native client uses RDMA to place its request directly on the remote server's queue, and the reply is placed directly on the client's reply queue.  This eliminates two message queue operations and two network operations.  The net result is that throughput increases 7 fold for remote operations by bypassing the BRIDGE and reduces latency from 1100 microseconds to 160 microseconds.  This diagram shows the message flow:



For the next release of Tuxedo sometime this summer, we're planning even more optimizations to achieve even more throughput and lower latency for remote operations.

Wednesday Aug 24, 2011

Oracle Tuxedo at OOW 2011

Oracle Open World 2011 is just around the corner. There will be quite a bit of Oracle Tuxedo specific activities this year. We will host five breakouts, two hands-on-labs and one birds-of-feather session. You will hear what’s new with Tuxedo and see many of the new features in action at the demo grounds. We will kick off the activities with Tuxedo roadmap discussion and delve into new features introduced over the last year, such as deploying existing Tuxedo applications and/or mainframe applications on Exalogic for better performance, reduced complexity and reduced operating expenses. Here is chronological listing of all Tuxedo related sessions:

1. 15730: Oracle Tuxedo: Roadmap and Strategy - Monday, 2pm

2. 15705: High performance web applications with C/C++/PHP/Python - Monday, 5pm

3. 33700: Birds-of-Feather: Road to Oracle Exalogic for Oracle Tuxedo Applications – Monday, 6:30pm

4. 15040: The ART and Practice of Mainframe Migration and Modernization – Tuesday, 4pm

5. 31020: Hands-on-Lab: Mainframe to Oracle Exalogic – Wednesday, 4:45pm

6. 15703: Integrating Oracle WebLogic/SOA with Legacy Mainframe Applications - Thursday, 10:30am

7. 31120: Hands-on-Lab: Develop High performance, service-oriented C/C++ applications for Oracle Exalogic – Thursday, 12pm

8. 15731: Modernizing Mainframe Applications Using Oracle Tuxedo ART 11g – Thursday, 1:30pm


Hope to see you in these sessions and at demo grounds!

Deepak Goel

Sr. Director, Tuxedo Development

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