Thursday Jan 16, 2014

Oracle Introduces Cloud Adapter to Simplify Salesforce.com Integration

A game changer addition to Oracle…” is how Matt Wright, CTO of Rubicon Red put itMatt Wright

If you have been asking yourself:

“Do I need another integration toolkit separate from my existing platform just for cloud integration?” or “Should I use the limited functionality integration tools within each cloud application I need to integrate?...Won’t that lead to a complex mess of disparate and overlapping integration?” 

If so, take a look at Oracle Cloud Adapters. This release significantly simplifies integration of Salesforce.com and lets companies more easily get a complete and unified view of customer and back-end data spanning cloud and on-premises applications using Oracle SOA Suite and the Oracle Cloud Adapter for Salesforce.com. Check out this Oracle Media Network Video (screenshot on the right) of Matt Wright, Maulik Shah, Technical Lead for Brocade Communications, and Badhri Rajagopalan, Practice Director SOA Integration with Bluenog.

Salesforce.com Integration

To address the questions posed above, this release illustrates Oracle’s integration strategy. Instead of companies having to deploy a cloud integration platform focused on cloud applications and then having a separate integration platform for existing applications, Oracle SOA Suite provides a single solution for integrating applications regardless of deployment location (public cloud, private cloud, or on-premises). This approach is designed to simplify integration and lower total cost of ownership in contrast to managing multiple disparate integration platforms and/or app-embedded integration toolkits, most of which use proprietary languages.

Although Oracle SOA Suite customers have been showcasing their cloud integration success stories for years at Oracle OpenWorld, this release eliminates many of the manual steps, automates session management tasks, and significantly simplifies security. Oracle SOA Suite customers already familiar with Oracle Application Adapters will see that the Oracle Cloud Adapters use the same wizard-based approach to provide visibility into the Salesforce.com business objects directly from within Oracle SOA Suite to simplify integration.

Customers using Oracle Applications such as E-Business Suite, Oracle Fusion Applications, etc. already have simplified integration since Oracle SOA Suite components are integrated or embedded into these applications. Combined with the Oracle Cloud Adapter for Salesforce.com, customers of both Oracle and Salesforce.com applications will have seamless integration spanning applications across the cloud and on-premises.

To learn more about simplifying integration, check out the Oracle white paper “Simplifying Cloud Integration

To download the Oracle Cloud Adapter for Salesforce.com, go to Oracle Technical Network for Oracle Integration Adapters

and join us for the Webcast "Simplify Integration with Oracle Cloud Adapter for Salesforce.com"

Register for Webcast

Friday May 10, 2013

The Difference Between Oracle and IBM Integration

Oracle and IBM are the only two Integration Platform vendors in the Leadership quadrant of all three Gartner Schneider White PaperMagic Quadrants for Application Infrastructure related to service integration (SOA). You may wonder “what’s the difference between Oracle and IBM integration offerings?” …they both provide application connectivity, have an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB), Business Activity Monitoring (BAM), event processing, process orchestration, business rules, management, governance and more. There are however several key differentiators between Oracle and IBM integration often referenced by industry analysts and end users that strongly impact complexity and total cost of ownership.

What sparked the creation of this blog was a customer case study on Schneider National, which transitioned from IBM Sterling Gentran B2B, IBM InterChange Server, and IBM MQ Series to Oracle SOA Suite and other Oracle Fusion Middleware. The case study highlights:

one of the key differentiators of Oracle integration over IBM integration…a unified approach to middleware to simplify integration and lower cost.

Much has been written on the IBM side of the unified discussion including cautions by industry analysts referring to the significant amount of ongoing professional services to support and deploy the collection of often overlapping IBM components. One example of the overlapping components is described on IBM’s website (page has since been removed but similar content is referenced on this site) which gives the 27 considerations to decipher when deciding when to use which of the 3 IBM ESBs for each different ESB-related scenario. For Oracle, there is one consideration...if you want application infrastructure agility, then the solution is all built into one Oracle Service Bus.

The complete Schneider National Customer Transformation story is available for download. Here is a quick summary of the background and key take-aways that highlight the unified difference in Oracle’s approach to integration:

Prior to the Transformation

  • Complex applications and data environment at Schneider
  • Expensive and time-consuming to maintain and evolve application integration
  • Multiple order entry systems, multiple rating engines, several sources of customer information, no “single version of the truth”
  • Launched a 5-year business transformation program – “Quest”

Objectives

  • Rationalize, simplify, and modernize enterprise IT applications and infrastructure
  • Create a modular, flexible, expandable and scalable IT architecture for long-term strategic growth
  • Core tenets: Common development environment, common runtime environment, and common management environment to standardize processes and tools

Results

  • Consolidated to a single core set of unified tools, providing a consistent programming model for developers
  • Lower development and maintenance costs
  • Over 200 application integrations
  • Introduced re-usable enterprise web services such as TranportationOrder, Claims, Shipment, Account, AccountProfile, Location, Driver, Supplier and more.
  • Real time tuning of data flow using 40 business rules
  • Proven scalability to over 20 million messages per day
  • Oracle B2B for EDI, part of Oracle SOA Suite, with over 900 trading partners and over 100 types of B2B documents

The end result for Schneider’s use of Oracle SOA Suite and all the major components of Oracle Fusion Middleware is a simplified solution for applications design, development, and maintenance, lower costs, improved productivity providing scalability, performance, and reliability to “power it’s growth in the next decade”

Schneider Stack Diagram

Image from the White Paper showing Schneider National's Application Infrastructure

Download the Schneider National Case Study

Thursday Mar 14, 2013

How Cisco Integrates Cloud & On-premise Apps with Oracle SOA Suite

Have you ever wondered how some big companies are able to rapidly acquire and merge applications?  Take a look at this webcast by Cisco’s Senior IT Manager Paras Jain. Shortly after the WebEx acquisition 5 years ago, Cisco consolidated to Webcast Slide #1a single unified customer experience for online ordering of cloud and on-premise collaboration applications. Within 6 months, Cisco achieved break-even on their Oracle SOA Suite integration investment, eliminated duplicate order data entry and significantly improved their service level agreements (SLAs).

In the webcast, Paras dives into their SaaS IT System Architecture to describe how Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle Service Bus are used for mediation, security, and monitoring as part of their subscription lifecycle management, partner ordering, quote & order, taxation and more as shown in the image below:

Cisco-WebEx SaaS IT System Architecture

Also covered are before and after slides of the order fulfillment process showing how Cisco simplifies and streamlines integration of cloud and on-premise applications and the associated processes. 

View this webcast and more from the Oracle SOA & BPM Customer Insights Webcast Series - LINK

Wednesday Mar 06, 2013

The SOA Mandate

I recall attending a Gartner integration conference in 2003, ten years after Gartner’s Alexander Pasik introduced the term SOA. Attendees were still voicing skepticism with comments like “SOA is just a new term for <insert unrelated re-use technology name here>” or “is this just another fad I can wait out?” Since this introduction, there has been a gradual but steady growth in the acceptance of service-based integration over the last decade as a strategy to increase agility and time-to-market but not as a mandate. SOA Mandate Image

A tipping point has finally occurred as a result of two recent trends, elevating the importance of SOA into a mandate for enterprise adoption for a large swath of medium to large size companies. The convergence of these two simultaneous trends are, for the first time, aggressively pushing SOA above the mandate threshold:

  1. Mobile Services are Different– At the most recent Gartner AADI event, the pre-event attendee survey indicated for the first time in several years that interest in “mobile enablement” jumped ahead of cloud which dropped to #2. During the keynote session, Gartner suggested a reason for mobile rising above cloud was due to companies having the option to slow down cloud adoption. For smartphone access, no such delay options exists. Customers have smartphones in their hands today and expect to interact with their accounts in an optimized mobile interface…simply put, smartphones have put urgency into mobile services. As Oracle SOA Suite customers have presented (Oracle OpenWorld 2012), mobile demands “mobile-sized” services that are different from existing service calls designed to support large amounts of data for large screen sizes over transmission rates that are far more reliable than intermittently limited mobile networks. The stronger the need for multiple types of service calls, the stronger the driver for getting serious about SOA
  2. Cloud Creating a More Disparate Infrastructure – In years past, most of the applications were on-premise and installed by the internal IT department, giving IT a stronger upfront role in the selection of the application and placing some priority on how well this application will integrate with the existing infrastructure. Now that more applications are cloud based, lines-of-business are able to select, and “deploy” new SaaS applications into production (initially uncoupled from existing enterprise applications) and therefore delay IT participation. Since every new cloud application vendor has its own specifications and techniques that it mandates for integration with their product, the relative uniformity of yesterdays purely on-premise infrastructure is rapidly disappearing. When IT gets involved for integration of the SaaS app with the existing infrastructure a full-featured integration platform supporting what is known as “any-to-any” transformation is a proven method to future-proof the infrastructure to support the next SaaS application. This point was highlighted by Oracle SOA Suite customer Geeta Pyne during the Oracle session at Gartner AADI and mentioned in a prior blog post.

What’s different about these two trends is a sense of urgency. In contrast to the classic drivers for SOA such as the need to enable businesses to roll out services faster, lower costs, and lower risk that were frequently addressed slowly, mobile service enablement and integrating disparate cloud applications can’t wait. As early adopters of SOA are proving out, having a service infrastructure in place allowed for rapid support of mobile services and integration of disparate cloud applications into the enterprises.

We are certainly well past the point of questioning the value of SOA. Instead…more and more enterprise companies are deciding SOA is a mandate for them to be able to deliver mobile services faster and support any new cloud application that joins the application infrastructure and maybe most importantly, gives them the flexibility to support a third trend when it arrives.

For more on cloud integration and mobile services enablement, follow this Oracle SOA blog and the social media channels highlighted on this page.

Monday Aug 13, 2012

Using Cloud OER to Find Fusion Applications On-Premise Service Concrete WSDL URL

In his latest blog post, Rajesh Raheja explains how on-premise customers without a dedicated OER can find a concrete service WSDL URL for their specific environment using the cloud hosted OER instance. Please read here for more details.

Five Frequently Asked Questions About EXTERNAL Web Services in Fusion Applications

If you're interested to find the answers to these questions (and find out what the questions are), plesae visit Rajesh Raheja's blog on Enterprise Software Development: Five Frequently Asked Questions About EXTERNAL Web Services in Fusion Applications.

About

Find Us on facebook Follow us on twitter Oracle SOA Suite forum
SOA PM team
Welcome to the Oracle SOA Suite team blog. We'll use this site for news and information that did not make it into our official documentation for a reason or another.

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
4
5
6
8
9
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today