Monday Jan 19, 2015

Pain Point #5: “Our company is concerned about data security, backup and recovery”

So far in this series on Addressing Analytic Pain Points, I’ve focused on the issues of data access, performance, scalability, application complexity, and production deployment. However, there are also fundamental needs for enterprise advanced analytics solutions that revolve around data security, backup, and recovery.

Traditional non-database analytics tools typically rely on flat files. If data originated in an RDBMS, that data must first be extracted. Once extracted, who has access to these flat files? Who is using this data and when? What operations are being performed? Security needs for data may be somewhat obvious, but what about the predictive models themselves? In some sense, these may be more valuable than the raw data since these models contain patterns and insights that help make the enterprise competitive, if not the dominant player. Are these models secure? Do we know who is using them, when, and with what operations? In short, what audit capabilities are available?

While security is a hot topic for most enterprises, it is essential to have a well-defined backup process in place. Enterprises normally have well-established database backup procedures that database administrators (DBAs) rigorously follow. If data and models are stored in flat files, perhaps in a distributed environment, one must ask what procedures exist and with what guarantees. Are the data files taxing file system backup mechanisms already in place – or not being backed up at all?

On the other hand, recovery involves using those backups to restore the database to a consistent state, reapplying any changes since the last backup. Again, enterprises normally have well-established database recovery procedures that are used by DBAs. If separate backup and recovery mechanisms are used for data, models, and scores, it may be difficult, if not impossible, to reconstruct a consistent view of an application or system that uses advanced analytics. If separate mechanisms are in place, they are likely more complex than necessary.

For Oracle Advanced Analytics (OAA), data is secured via Oracle Database, which wins security awards and is highly regarded for its ability to provide secure data for confidentiality, integrity, availability, authentication, authorization, and non-repudiation. Oracle Database logs and monitors user activity. Users can work independently or jointly in a shared environment with data access controlled by standard database privileges. The data itself can be encrypted and data redaction is supported.

OAA models are secured in one of two ways: (i) models produced in the kernel of the database are treated as first-class database objects with corresponding access privileges (create, update, delete, execute), and (ii) models produced through the R interface can be stored in the R datastore, which exists as a database table in the user's schema with its own access privileges. In either case, users must log into their Oracle Database schema/account, which provides the needed degree of confidentiality, integrity, availability, authentication, authorization, and non-repudiation.

Enterprise Oracle DBAs already follow rigorous backup and recovery procedures. The ability to reuse these procedures in conjunction with advanced analytics solutions is a major simplification and helps to ensure the integrity of data, models, and results.

Tuesday Dec 23, 2014

Pain Point #4: “Recoding R (or other) models into SQL, C, or Java takes time and is error prone”

In the previous post in this series Addressing Analytic Pain Points, I focused on some issues surrounding production deployment of advanced analytics solutions. One specific aspect of production deployment involves how to get predictive model results (e.g., scores) from R or leading vendor tools into applications that are based on programming languages such as SQL, C, or Java. In certain environments, one way to integrate predictive models involves recoding them into one of these languages. Recoding involves identifying the minimal information needed for scoring, i.e., making predictions, and implementing that in a language that is compatible with the target environment. For example, consider a linear regression model with coefficients. It can be fairly straightforward to write a SQL statement or a function in C or Java to produce a score using these coefficients. This translated model can then be integrated with production applications or systems.

While recoding has been a technique used for decades, it suffers from several drawbacks: latency, quality, and robustness. Latency refers to the time delay between the data scientist developing the solution and leveraging that solution in production. Customers recount historic horror stories where the process from analyst to software developers to application deployment took months. Quality comes into play on two levels: the coding and testing quality of the software produced, and the freshness of the model itself. In fast changing environments, models may become “stale” within days or weeks. As a result, latency can impact quality. In addition, while a stripped down implementation of the scoring function is possible, it may not account for all cases considered by the original algorithm implementer. As such, robustness, i.e., the ability to handle greater variation in the input data, may suffer.

One way to address this pain point is to make it easy to leverage predictive models immediately (especially open source R and in-database Oracle Advanced Analytics models), thereby eliminating the need to recode models. Since enterprise applications normally know how to interact with databases via SQL, as soon as a model is produced, it can be placed into production via SQL access. In the case of R models, these can be accessed using Oracle R Enterprise embedded R execution in parallel via ore.rowApply and, for select models, the ore.predict capability performs automatic translation of native R models for execution inside the database. In the case of native SQL Oracle Advanced Analytics interface algorithms, as found in Oracle Data Mining and exposed through an R interface in Oracle R Enterprise, users can perform scoring directly in Oracle Database. This capability minimizes or even eliminates latency, dramatically increases quality, and leverages the robustness of the original algorithm implementations.

Friday Oct 24, 2014

Pain Point #1: “It takes too long to get my data or to get the ‘right’ data”

This is the first in a series on Addressing Analytic Pain Points: “It takes too long to get my data or to get the ‘right’ data.”

Analytics users can be characterized along multiple dimensions. One such dimension is how they get access to or receive data. For example, some receive data via flat files. Since we’re talking about “enterprise” users, this often means data stored in RDBMSs where users request data extracts from a DBA or more generally the IT department. Turnaround time can be hours to days, or even weeks, depending on the organization. If the data scientist needs more or different data, the cycle repeats – often leading to frustration on both sides and delays in generating results.

Others users are granted access to databases directly using programmatic access tools like ODBC, JDBC, their corresponding R variants, or ROracle. These users may be given read-only access to a range of data tables, possibly in a sandbox schema. Here, analytics users don’t have to go back to their DBA or IT as to obtain extracts, but they still need to pull the data from the database to their client environment, e.g., a laptop, and push results back to the database. If significant volumes of data are involved, the time required for pulling data can hinder productivity. (Of course, this assumes the client has enough RAM to load the needed data sets, but that’s a topic for the next blog post.)

To address the first type of user, since much of the data in question resides in databases, empowering users with a self service model mitigates the vicious cycle described above. When the available data are readily accessible to analytics users, they can see and select what they need at will. An Oracle Database solution addresses this data access pain point by providing schema access, possibly in a sandbox with read-only table access, for the analytics user.

Even so, this approach just turns the first type of user into the second mentioned above. An Oracle Database solution further addresses this pain point by either minimizing or eliminating data movement as much as possible. Most analytics engines bring data to the computation, requiring extracts and in some cases even proprietary formats before being able to perform analytics. This takes time. Often, data movement can dwarf the time required to perform the actual computation. From the perspective of the analytics user, this is wasted time because it is just a perfunctory step on the way to getting the desired results. By bringing computation to the data, using Oracle Advanced Analytics (Oracle R Enterprise and Oracle Data Mining), the time normally required to move data is eliminated. Consider the time savings of being able to prepare data, compute statistics, or build predictive models and score data directly in the database. Using Oracle Advanced Analytics, either from R via Oracle R Enterprise, SQL via Oracle Data Mining, or the graphical interface Oracle Data Miner, users can leverage Oracle Database as a high performance computational engine.

We should also note that Oracle Database has the high performance Oracle Call Interface (OCI) library for programmatic data access. For R users, Oracle provides the package ROracle that is optimized using OCI for fast data access. While ROracle performance may be much faster than other methods (ODBC- and JDBC-based), the time is still greater than zero and there are other problems that I’ll address in the next pain point.

Addressing Analytic Pain Points

If you’re an enterprise data scientist, data analyst, or statistician, and perform analytics using R or another third party analytics engine, you’ve likely encountered one or more of these pain points:

Pain Point #1: “It takes too long to get my data or to get the ‘right’ data”
Pain Point #2: “I can’t analyze or mine all of my data – it has to be sampled”
Pain Point #3: “Putting R (or other) models and results into production is ad hoc and complex”
Pain Point #4: “Recoding R (or other) models into SQL, C, or Java takes time and is error prone”
Pain Point #5: “Our company is concerned about data security, backup and recovery”
Pain Point #6: “We need to build 10s of thousands of models fast to meet business objectives”

Some pain points are related to the scale of data, yet others are felt regardless of data size. In this blog series, I’ll explore each of these pain points, how they affect analytics users and their organizations, and how Oracle Advanced Analytics addresses them.

Thursday May 01, 2014

"Darden uses analytics to understand customer restaurants"

See the InformationWeek article Darden Uses Analytics To Understand Restaurant Customers highlighting Darden's use of Oracle Advanced Analytics:


"Check-Level Analytics is one of the tools Darden plans to use to boost sales and customer loyalty, while pulling together data from across all its operations to show how they can work together better. ... it brought in some new tools, including Oracle Data Miner and Oracle R Enterprise, both included in the Oracle Advanced Analytics option to Oracle Database, to spot correlations and meaningful patterns in the data." 

Darden's data analytics project earned them the 5th spot on this year's InformationWeek Elite 100 ranking.

Thursday Feb 16, 2012

Oracle Announces Availability of Oracle Advanced Analytics for Big Data

Oracle Announces Availability of Oracle Advanced Analytics for Big Data

Oracle Integrates R Statistical Programming Language into Oracle Database 11g

REDWOOD SHORES, Calif. - February 8, 2012

News Facts

Oracle today announced the availability of  Oracle Advanced Analytics, a new option for Oracle Database 11g that bundles Oracle R Enterprise together with Oracle Data Mining.
Oracle R Enterprise delivers enterprise class performance for users of the R statistical programming language, increasing the scale of data that can be analyzed by orders of magnitude using Oracle Database 11g.
R has attracted over two million users since its introduction in 1995, and Oracle R Enterprise dramatically advances capability for R users. Their existing R development skills, tools, and scripts can now also run transparently, and scale against data stored in Oracle Database 11g.
Customer testing of Oracle R Enterprise for Big Data analytics on Oracle Exadata has shown up to 100x increase in performance in comparison to their current environment.
Oracle Data Mining, now part of Oracle Advanced Analytics, helps enable customers to easily build and deploy predictive analytic applications that help deliver new insights into business performance.
Oracle Advanced Analytics, in conjunction with Oracle Big Data Appliance, Oracle Exadata Database Machine and Oracle Exalytics In-Memory Machine, delivers the industry’s most integrated and comprehensive platform for Big Data analytics.

Comprehensive In-Database Platform for Advanced Analytics

Oracle Advanced Analytics brings analytic algorithms to data stored in Oracle Database 11g and Oracle Exadata as opposed to the traditional approach of extracting data to laptops or specialized servers.
With Oracle Advanced Analytics, customers have a comprehensive platform for real-time analytic applications that deliver insight into key business subjects such as churn prediction, product recommendations, and fraud alerting.
By providing direct and controlled access to data stored in Oracle Database 11g, customers can accelerate data analyst productivity while maintaining data security throughout the enterprise.
Powered by decades of Oracle Database innovation, Oracle R Enterprise helps enable analysts to run a variety of sophisticated numerical techniques on billion row data sets in a matter of seconds making iterative, speed of thought, and high-quality numerical analysis on Big Data practical.
Oracle R Enterprise drastically reduces the time to deploy models by eliminating the need to translate the models to other languages before they can be deployed in production.
Oracle R Enterprise integrates the extensive set of Oracle Database data mining algorithms, analytics, and access to Oracle OLAP cubes into the R language for transparent use by R users.
Oracle Data Mining provides an extensive set of in-database data mining algorithms that solve a wide range of business problems. These predictive models can be deployed in Oracle Database 11g and use Oracle Exadata Smart Scan to rapidly score huge volumes of data.
The tight integration between R, Oracle Database 11g, and Hadoop enables R users to write one R script that can run in three different environments: a laptop running open source R, Hadoop running with Oracle Big Data Connectors, and Oracle Database 11g.
Oracle provides single vendor support for the entire Big Data platform spanning the hardware stack, operating system, open source R, Oracle R Enterprise and Oracle Database 11g.
To enable easy enterprise-wide Big Data analysis, results from Oracle Advanced Analytics can be viewed from Oracle Business Intelligence Foundation Suite and Oracle Exalytics In-Memory Machine.

Supporting Quotes

“Oracle is committed to meeting the challenges of Big Data analytics. By building upon the analytical depth of Oracle SQL, Oracle Data Mining and the R environment, Oracle is delivering a scalable and secure Big Data platform to help our customers solve the toughest analytics problems,” said Andrew Mendelsohn, senior vice president, Oracle Server Technologies.
“We work with leading edge customers who rely on us to deliver better BI from their Oracle Databases. The new Oracle R Enterprise functionality allows us to perform deep analytics on Big Data stored in Oracle Databases. By leveraging R and its library of open source contributed CRAN packages combined with the power and scalability of Oracle Database 11g, we can now do that,” said Mark Rittman, co-founder, Rittman Mead.

Supporting Resources

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About Oracle

Oracle engineers hardware and software to work together in the cloud and in your data center. For more information about Oracle (NASDAQ: ORCL), visit http://www.oracle.com.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Contact Info

Eloy Ontiveros
Oracle
+1.650.607.6458
eloy.ontiveros@oracle.com

Joan Levy
Blanc & Otus for Oracle
+1.415.856.5110
jlevy@blancandotus.com

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The place for best practices, tips, and tricks for applying Oracle R Enterprise, Oracle R Distribution, ROracle, and Oracle R Advanced Analytics for Hadoop in both traditional and Big Data environments.

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