Friday Mar 06, 2015

5 Steps for Installing Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Solaris 11

You can install and run Oracle Database 12c on different platforms, but if you install it on an Oracle Solaris 11 zone, you can take advantage of these capabilities:

  • Isolation - Database processes that execute in one zone have no access to database processes running in another zone. This isolation simplifies database consolidation, allowing multiple instances and versions to coexist safely on a single physical machine.
  • Independently Managed and Autonomous Environments - A non-global zone can be booted, patched, and shut down independently. A failure or reboot of one zone has no impact on other zones (unless, of course, a failure is due to a shared component). A zone reboot is faster than a full server reboot (seconds versus minutes), so a database in a rebooted zone is available more quickly.
  • Distinctive Identity - You can define virtual network interfaces for a zone, so you can give the database instance installed on that zone its own independent host name and IP address. You can also apply networking resource controls to zones, aligning network bandwidth consumption with service level targets.
  • Easy Database Instance Migration - If a database needs more CPU power, you can add CPUs to an Oracle Solaris Zone and reboot the zone. If a database needs more compute capacity than what's available in the physical server, you can migrate the zone to a larger server.
  • Hard Partitioning - Assigning a resource pool or capping CPU cores can configure Oracle Solaris Zones as hard partitions for Oracle Database licensing purposes. This can potentially lower database licensing costs.

Tech Article: 5 Steps to Installing Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Solaris 11

by Ginny Henningsen and Glynn Foster

Ginny Henningsen and Glynn Foster from the Oracle Solaris product management team wrote down the simplest instructions for installing Oracle Database 12c in an Oracle Solaris 11 non-global zone, including how to implement hard partitioning.

About the Photograph

That's a closeup of one section of the Cedar Breaks National Monument, in Utah. I snapped the picture from a lookout located at an altitude of over 10,000 feet.

- Rick

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Monday Jan 23, 2012

How to Survive the End of the World - Part II

In Part I of our Survival Guide for Civilization, I explained how to save civilization by identifying four distant planets that had the essential building blocks of civilization and combining them into a 5-node cluster with Earth:

Building BlockDistant Planet
--------------------------------------
footballDitka
cheerleadersDallas
beerBud
bratsMilwaukee
--------------------------------------
civilizationbackup civilization

As mentioned in Part I, the resulting five-node cluster was actually more than what we wanted. Five distant planets! We'd rather not deal with the overhead of managing five distant planets. We prefer to keep managing just one planet, but make sure that can keep civilization humming. Turns out that we can accomplish that through the magic of virtualization. As you might expect, it's called a virtual cluster. (Really techie people call it a failover zone cluster.)

First, we create one zone on Earth for each building block:

Building BlockZone on Earth
--------------------------------------
footballfootball-zone
cheerleaderscheerleader-zone
beerbeer-zone
bratsbrats-zone
--------------------------------------
civilizationcivilization zones

Then we create one failover zone on each distant planet for each zone on Earth:

Zone on EarthFailover ZoneDistant Planet
---------------------------------------------------------
football-zonefootball-failover-zoneDitka
cheerleaderscheerleaders-failover-zoneDallas
beerbeer-failover-zoneBud
bratsbrats-failover-zoneMilwaukee
---------------------------------------------------------
zone civilizationfailover zone civilization

In this way, each failover zone on its distant planet backs up one original zone on Earth. It's a great way to save civilization with much less overhead.

As it turns out, not only do we have an article that shows you how to create a cluster with Solaris Cluster 4.0, but we have one that shows you how to create a failover cluster, too:

How to Create A Failover Zone Cluster

Give it a try. It never hurts to be prepared.

- Rick
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