Tuesday May 19, 2015

Tech Article: How to Start Using Docker on Oracle Linux

As Ginny Henningsen puts it, "Docker is an open source virtualization technology that creates lightweight Linux application containers." What I think is particularly cool about Docker is the portability it derives from its open-source genes. As Ginny explains:

"Docker containers can define an application and its dependencies using a small text file (a Dockerfile) that can be moved to different Linux releases and quickly rebuilt, simplifying application portability. In this way, "Dockerized" applications are easily migrated to different Linux servers where they can execute on bare metal, in a virtual machine, or on Linux instances in the cloud."

Here's her article, plus a few additional resources to help you include Docker in your Linux deployments:

Tech Article: Getting Started with Docker on Oracle Linux

by Ginny Henningsen

How to customize a Docker container image and use it to instantiate application instances across different Linux servers. This article describes how to create a Dockerfile, how to allocate runtime resources to containers, and how to establish a communication channel between two containers (for example, between web server and database containers).

Docker Resources

About the Photograph

I took the picture of that wagon in Stovepipe Wells, Death Valley, on my ride to the Sun Reunion.

- Rick

P.S. My last day at Oracle will be May 31. If you'd like to stay in touch, use the links on the left, below:

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Friday Mar 06, 2015

5 Steps for Installing Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Solaris 11

You can install and run Oracle Database 12c on different platforms, but if you install it on an Oracle Solaris 11 zone, you can take advantage of these capabilities:

  • Isolation - Database processes that execute in one zone have no access to database processes running in another zone. This isolation simplifies database consolidation, allowing multiple instances and versions to coexist safely on a single physical machine.
  • Independently Managed and Autonomous Environments - A non-global zone can be booted, patched, and shut down independently. A failure or reboot of one zone has no impact on other zones (unless, of course, a failure is due to a shared component). A zone reboot is faster than a full server reboot (seconds versus minutes), so a database in a rebooted zone is available more quickly.
  • Distinctive Identity - You can define virtual network interfaces for a zone, so you can give the database instance installed on that zone its own independent host name and IP address. You can also apply networking resource controls to zones, aligning network bandwidth consumption with service level targets.
  • Easy Database Instance Migration - If a database needs more CPU power, you can add CPUs to an Oracle Solaris Zone and reboot the zone. If a database needs more compute capacity than what's available in the physical server, you can migrate the zone to a larger server.
  • Hard Partitioning - Assigning a resource pool or capping CPU cores can configure Oracle Solaris Zones as hard partitions for Oracle Database licensing purposes. This can potentially lower database licensing costs.

Tech Article: 5 Steps to Installing Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Solaris 11

by Ginny Henningsen and Glynn Foster

Ginny Henningsen and Glynn Foster from the Oracle Solaris product management team wrote down the simplest instructions for installing Oracle Database 12c in an Oracle Solaris 11 non-global zone, including how to implement hard partitioning.

About the Photograph

That's a closeup of one section of the Cedar Breaks National Monument, in Utah. I snapped the picture from a lookout located at an altitude of over 10,000 feet.

- Rick

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Friday Feb 13, 2015

How to Build a Software Defined Network with Oracle Solaris 11





Before software engineers got so freakin' smart, we used to pay a special type of sysadmin to fiddle with the cables and switches at the back of our racks. They were mean, they were hunch-backed, and their fingers were stained with nicotine.

Those were the good old days. Today, network administrators wash their clothes and and sit at desks. And they use something called "software defined networking." I looked it up in the Urban Dictionary, but there was no listing for it. Which is just as well because if you ask me ...

Software Defined Networking = voodoo magic






A Little Bit About Software Defined Networking

Software Defined Networking is the equivalent of doing your homework the week before it's due. I mean, who does that? Well, the Solaris engineers at Oracle do, for starters. Talk about annoying! They started this trend back in the early days of Oracle Solaris 11. Instead of visiting Rufus in the basement server room, they designed this infrastructure that makes it possible for them to put dibs on networking resources from the comfort of the local Starbucks.

In other words, instead of Rufus yanking cables out of one box and hooking them up to another, you can simply change the cable routing by keyboard, so to speak. And assign them to virtual compute nodes. And configure all kinds of aspects about each network, including Service Level Agreements, an implement of Trotskyist-Leninist Totalitarianism if there ever was one. All without waking Rufus.

Orgad Kimchi, our fearless explorer of real-world Solaris, horsed around with not only the software defined networking capabilities of Oracle Solaris 11, but its latest features, which, in his words provide "greater application agility without the added overhead of expensive network hardware." The SDN features in Oracle Solaris 11.2 now:

  • Enable application-driven, multitenant cloud virtual networking across a completely distributed set of systems
  • Allow network service-level agreements (SLAs) at the application level
  • Provide cloud-readiness, thanks to the OpenStack distribution include in Oracle Solaris 11
  • Integrate tightly with Oracle Solaris Zones.

Tech Article: How to Build a Software Defined Network Using Elastic Virtual Switches

In Oracle Solaris 11.2

Orgad starts by walking you through the steps to set up SSH authentication and the Elastic Virtual Switch controller. Then he shows you how to configure both compute nodes, the four Solaris zones, and their virtual networks. He wraps up by showing you how to test the entire configuration to make sure it's working the way you want. Orgad writes from real-world experience, so you can trust his recommendations.



About the Photographs

I snapped the picture of the lamp at Stovepipe Wells, and the picture of Linda Lu, my 2008 Harley Davidson Softail Custom, while riding through Death Valley, California in the Spring of 2014. To get a better feel for the strange vastness of Death Valley, click on the image below to go to Wordpress, then click on the Wordpress image to enlarge it.



- Rick

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Friday Jul 11, 2014

What Can You Do With Data Link Multipathing (DLMP)?

When I first learned about high availability, it was something you provided by creating one or more copies of the operating environment on separate servers. Sometimes on different continents. If the server in Canada failed, the server in Ireland would take over.

Then I found out about Real Application Clusters. Wait, I asked myself, weren't applications invented for the sole purpose of field-testing the OS? Why do test programs need high availability? Haven't these people heard of Oracle Solaris Cluster?

Well, to my great disappointment there are plenty of different approaches to high availability. Just like there are plenty of different approaches to virtualization. And, as you might imagine, you can combine the two.

For instance, if you're going to build a cloud infrastructure using the virtualization capabilities in Oracle Solaris 11, you might as well allocate your network resources to the virtualized environment, as well. And so, you'd probably find yourself creating virtual switches, routers, cards, and what not. Well, what happens if all those virtual networks, which are really just one physical network, go down?

Bjoern Rost, Oracle ACE, provides a nice explanation of a Solaris feature that didn't get a lot of attention when it was released: Data Link Multipathing (DLMP) and DLMP aggregation. DLMP aggregation allows you to combine virtual network interfaces from different physical network interfaces into high availability clusters. You can also use these clusters to improve load balancing, as Bjoern explains in his blog post.

Orgad likes DLMP, too. So much, in fact, that he took a break from reconfiguring the International Space Station so his kids could control it from their XBox, and wrote an article explaining how to apply DLMP to a virtual network. Two articles, in fact.

Tech Article: Using DLMP to Add High Availability to Your Network in Oracle Solaris 11.1

by Orgad Kimchi

How to combine virtual NICs from different physical NICS into a DLMP aggregation assigned to a zone, and configure the aggregation to provide failover for the zone, using Oracle Solaris 11.

Tech Article: Doing More with DLMP

by Orgad Kimchi

You can give an Oracle Solaris 11 zone exclusive access to a physical NIC. Although that approach can ensure that particular zone has full access the entire bandwidth of the NIC, it does leave NIC and the entire network exposed to security breaches. Unless you use DLMP's Link Protection capability. Orgad explains how to do that, as well as enabling resource management for your Oracle Solaris 11 virtual network, improving the availability of an NFS server, and more.

About the Photograph

Lou Ordorica and I took off early a few weeks ago to get in some twisties before the crowds showed up. We stopped at The Last Shot on the Peak to Peak highway to grab a late breakfast/early lunch. While we were there a few more bikes showed up.

- Rick
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Tuesday May 06, 2014

Replay of Solaris Labs From OTN Virtual Sysadmin Day

Missed OTN's last Virtual Sysadmin Day? That's OK, so did the majority of Earth's 7 billion inhabitants. A stalwart 400 did manage to pull themselves away from The Daily Grind and attend in person. To accommodate the remaining 7 billion slackers, I published videos of the Solaris hands-on labs. I'll do the same for the Oracle Linux and Virtualization sessions over the next few days.

Lab Intro - How Oracle Solaris 11 Simplifies the Life of a Sysadmin

Typical tasks and challenges in a sysadmin's work and how Oracle Solaris 11 simplifies them. Managing software packages, updating systems, managing users, monitoring system performance and diagnosing problems, assessing, assigning and redistributing system resources according to workload patterns. Which Oracle Solaris 11 features can help. Examples and best practices. Exercises that model everyday situations.

Lab 1: Managing the Software Lifecycle with Oracle Solaris 11

Tricks to help you to manage software packages installed on your systems. Most organizations have separate environments for development, test, QA and production applications. How can you make sure the right versions of software packages are installed in each of them, and avoid inconsistencies? How can you configure your production systems to avoid accidental updates? How should you integrate your software packages with SMF services? These and many other questions will be answered by using practical hands-on examples.

Lab 2: Managing Your Data with ZFS in Oracle Solaris 11

ZFS has been a round a long time, but it has so many new capabilities to explore that you might still have a lot of questions. For instance, how do I create a ZFS file system that will have a guaranteed amount of available space, instead of sharing it with other file systems in a pool? What are the best practices for backing up ZFS file systems? How can I use ZFS encryption? Can I create a raw block device on ZFS and why do I need it? These and many other questions will be answered by using practical hands-on examples.

Lab 3: Managing Virtual Environments in Oracle Solaris 11

What are the best ways to create and manage zones? How should I use Solaris virtual networking to separate traffic from different applications? How can I monitor and manage system resources assigned to zones? How should I protect my zones from malicious users? How can I migrate zones between hosts? These and many other questions will be answered with practical hands-on examples.

About the Photograph

Photo of Las Vegas skyline taken by Rick Ramsey at Collaborate 2014

- Rick
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Monday Apr 14, 2014

Which Type of Virtualization Should I Use?

I routinely ask techies which type of virtualization they'd recommend for which type of job. I seldom get an answer as crystal clear as Brian Bream's.

Video Interview: Which Type of Virtualization Should I Use?

with Brian Bream, CTO Collier IT

Oracle's portfolio of virtualization technologies includes Oracle VM Server for x86, Oracle VM Server for SPARC (previously known as LDOMS), and Oracle Solaris Zones, among others. Brian Bream provides a crystal clear technical overview of their differences and examples of what you would use them to do to. After you listen to the recording, which is about 5 minutes long, you'll understand why Brian was selected Instructor of the Year for both Oracle University and Sun Microsystems University before that.

More Resources About Virtualization

Here's an 8-part series about Oracle virtualization products written by Detlef Drewanz and Lenz Grimmer that might also be helpful:

About the Photograph

Photograph of Vaillancourt Fountain in San Francisco taken by Rick Ramsey, April 2014.

- Rick

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Thursday Jan 23, 2014

Hands-On Lab Setup Instructions Now Available for Next Virtual Sysadmin Day

As you may already know, OTN's next Virtual Sysadmin Day is on January 28 from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm PT. This sysadmin day is going to be very cool because its hands-on labs focus on solving real-world problems with Oracle technologies.

You'll definitely want to do the prep work before the day of the event. The prep work consists of configuring your laptop and uploading the images. Don't be that guy. The one who, the day of, asks where the instructions are. Him. Don't be him.

Pre-Event Checklist

The checklist provides:

  • Virtual Conference hardware requirements
  • Virtual Conference software requirements
  • Setup instructions for Oracle Solaris labs
  • Setup instructions for Oracle Linux labs
  • Setup instructions for Oracle VM labs

If You Must Tweet

If you can't keep your hands off your danged phone while working on the labs, at least use this hashtag:

#OTNVSAD

Questions for Ed

Oracle ACE extraordinaire Ed Whalen and I will be hanging out at the Sysadmin Lounge during the last 30-45 minutes of the event. Ed knows his stuff, so if you have any questions about Linux, such as how to optimize it for the database or other applications, ask Ed. If you have questions about Harleys or Ducatis, ask me.

See you next week.

photograph of Harleys in Wisconsin by Rick Ramsey

- Rick

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Monday Jan 13, 2014

Lab - How to Deploy Oracle Software in Minutes Using Oracle VM Templates

In my first 12 years of school I had a natural ability in Math and Science, but had to work hard at English and History.

When I went to college, I didn't do well in Math and Science, so I transferred into Liberal Arts, where strangely enough, I did well. After all these years I just realized why. I never had to study for Math and Science. I just understood the material. If I did any homework, I did it during class. Which means I never listened to lectures. As a result, I never learned how to learn what I didn't know. So, when college presented me with more advanced topics that I couldn't just grok, I didn't know what to do. I fell behind. I assumed I wasn't any good. The opposite was true with Liberal Arts. Literature, History, Economics, it all confused me. So I listened in class. And I studied after class. SoI did well.

And that's why I'm not an engineer.

If you're a hands-on learner like me and Joel Schallhorn, the guy doing bicycle tricks in the picture, you'll appreciate our latest hands-on lab.

Lab: How to Deploy a Four-Node Oracle RAC 12c Cluster in Minutes, Using Oracle VM Templates

Hands-On Lab by Olivier Canonge with contributions from Christophe Pauliat, Simon Coter, Saar Maoz, Doan Nguyen, Ludovic Sorriaux, Cecile Naud, and Robbie De Meyer

This lab demonstrates how easy it is to deploy software environments with Oracle VM Templates. It uses a single-instance, Oracle Restart (Single-Instance High Availability [SIHA]), and Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC) for Oracle Database as an example. During this lab, you are going to deploy a four-node Flex Cluster (three hubs and one leaf) with a dedicated network for Oracle Flex ASM traffic.

See more of Joel Schallhorn on Instagram | Facebook | YouTube

- Rick

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Wednesday Jan 08, 2014

Hands-On Lab: How to Deploy and Manage a Private Cloud

Hands-On Lab: How to Deploy and Manage a Private Cloud

With Oracle VM and Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c

We just updated this lab to get it ready for OTN's next Virtual SA Day on January 28. You can run the lab anytime from your laptop, or you can attend our virtual event and run it with the help of a proctor. There will be several hundred sysadmins running the same lab at the same time, so you can discuss it with others via chat, and get help from our proctors. Details here.

Cloud Building with Oracle Solaris

Blog by OTN Garage

At the risk of raising PITA's ire, there's more than one way to skin a cat. This blog provides three resources to help you build a private cloud with Oracle Solaris: one training class and two tech articles.

photograph of clouds at sunset over Colorado snapped by Rick Ramsey with lousy iPhone camera

- Rick

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Thursday Jan 02, 2014

About our Latest Lab: How to Migrate to Oracle Linux and Oracle VM





Step by Step Instructions for Migrating to Oracle Linux and Oracle VM

Red Hat Linux and VMWare are fine technologies. A great pairing. However, if you have business reasons for migrating to Oracle Linux and Oracle VM, such as having earlier access to the latest Linux innovations or taking advantage of more integrated virtualization, take a look at our latest lab. It provides the best step by step instructions we could come up with for carrying out that migration. You can also try it just to hone your migration skills. You never know when the boss is going to ask you whether you can handle a migration.





Here's a peek at the major tasks:

  1. Start the two servers (Oracle VM Server and Oracle VM Manager).
  2. Connect to Oracle VM Manager and become familiar with the product.
  3. Verify that the Oracle VM environment started correctly.
  4. Import an assembly that has Oracle Database on top and was exported from VMware.
  5. Create an Oracle VM Template based on the VMware assembly.
  6. Edit the Oracle VM Template that was created.
  7. Create a guest based on the Oracle VM Template that was created.
  8. Verify and then start the Oracle VM guest that was created.
  9. Manually modify the guest configuration and remove VMware tools.
  10. Switch from the Red Hat kernel to Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for free.
  11. Transform the guest into a usable Oracle VM Template ("gold image").

You can run the lab anytime you like on your laptop, or you can attend OTN's next Virtual SA Day, and run it with the help of a proctor. There will be several hundred sysadmins running the same lab at the same time, so you can discuss it with others via chat, and get help from our proctors. Details here.

photograph of a brewery in Ouray, Colorado, by Rick Ramsey

- Rick

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Monday Dec 16, 2013

Why I'm Going Straight to Hell

Article: Performance Analysis in a Multitenant Cloud Environment

by Orgad Kimchi

My little brother and I used to drive our Sainted Mother mad with this game at bed time. We'd wait till she was stressed out, then throw something big, like a softball, against the wall. Being a worry-wart, she'd come into the room to find out which one of us had fallen out of his bed and broken his arm. We both pretended to be fast asleep, of course, and had already recovered the soft ball.

Perplexed, she would return to the kitchen. A short while later, we would throw the bat against the wall. After the initial boom against the sheetrock, it would clatter on the ground, making a sound similar to a mother's precious child cracking his skull on the cement steps in front of the house. Quickly one of us would recover it, tuck it under the sheets, and then we'd both return to our previous sleeping positions.

Little did we know, as we pushed our mother closer to the edge of Insanity, that our techniques would be adopted by virtualized environments the world over. As Orgad explains in the article above, as each virtualization product abstracts computing resources for isolation or other purposes, it creates a little brother. If something goes boom in the night or, if your environment starts hanging, how do you figure out where the problem is?

It's a super article, and well worth your time. If Mom had read it, we would have woken up inside an anthill, with only our heads sticking out so she could listen to our screams while she sipped a cup of Darjeeling.

Article: Performance Analysis in a Multitenant Cloud Environment

Performance analysis in a virtualized multitenant cloud environment is difficult because of the abstraction layers. How do you find the physical system resources that are overloaded? Orgad Kimchi explores four examples that show how you how with the built-in Oracle Solaris 11 tools.

Other Content By Or About Orgad

- Rick

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Tuesday Dec 03, 2013

Life Could Be A Dream (Hadoop Hadoop)

Hey nonny ding dong, alang alang alang
Boom ba-doh, ba-doo ba-doodle-ay

Oh, life could be a dream (hadoop)
If I could take you up in paradise up above (hadoop)
If you would tell me I'm the only one that you love
Life could be a dream, sweetheart
(Hello, hello again, hadoop and hopin' we'll meet again)

Tech Article: How to Set Up a Hadoop Cluster Using Oracle Solaris Zones

by Orgad Kimchi

Apache Hadoop helps you process large amounts of data on multiple computers that are clustered together. Oracle Solaris zones are easy to clone and manage as a cluster. Oracle Solaris 11 has great network virtualization capabilities. Orgad walks you through all the steps required to combine these three technologies into an easy to manage big data cluster.

Blog: How to Host a Hadoop Cluster on a SPARC T4-2 Server

by Jeff Taylor

After reading Orgad's paper (see above), Jeff Taylor decided to give Orgad's suggestion a try. He had to configure an Oracle SPARC T4-2 server to store and process two types of data. One type was critical and sensitive data that required ACID transactions and had to be stored in an Oracle Database. The other was high-volume/low-risk data that had to be processed using Apache Hadoop and stored in HDFS. In this blog post he details how he used Oracle Solaris zones.

Video Interview: Why Run Hadoop on Oracle Solaris?

with Orgad Kimchi

Orgad Kimchi provides three technical reasons why you should run Hadoop on Oracle Solaris. Taped at Oracle OpenWorld.

Lyrics to Hadoop Hadoop

by the Crew Cuts

Hey nonny ding dong, alang alang alang
Boom ba-doh, ba-doo ba-doodle-ay

Oh, life could be a dream (ha-doop)
If I could take you up in paradise up above (ha-doop)
If you would tell me I'm the only one that you love
Life could be a dream, sweetheart
(Hello, hello again, ha-doop and hopin' we'll meet again)

Oh, life could be a dream (ha-doop)
If only all my precious plans would come true (ha-doop)
If you would let me spend my whole life lovin' you
Life could be a dream, sweetheart

Now every time I look at you
Something is on my mind (dat-dat-dat-dat-dat-duh)
If you do what I want you to
Baby, we'd be so fine!

Oh, life could be a dream (ha-doop)
If I could take you up in paradise up above (ha-doop)
If you would tell me I'm the only one that you love
Life could be a dream, sweetheart

Ha-doop ha-doop Ya-da-da Da-da-da Da-da-da Da
Ha-doop ha-doop Ya-da-da Da-da-da Da-da-da Da
Ha-doop ha-doop Ya-da-da Da-da-da Da-da-da Da, ha-doop!

Ha-doop ha-doop Ya-da-da Da-da-da Da-da-da Da
Ha-doop ha-doop Ya-da-da Da-da-da Da-da-da Da
Ha-doop ha-doop Ya-da-da Da-da-da Da-da-da Da, ha-doop!

Every time I look at you
Somethin' is on my mind
If you do what I want you to
Baby, we'd be so fine!

Life could be a dream
If I could take you up in paradise up above
If you would tell me I'm the only one that you love
Life could be a dream, sweetheart
(Hello hello again, ha-doop and hopin' we'll meet again) doop ha-doop

Hey nonny ding dong, alang alang alang (ha-doop)
Ba-doh, ba-doo ba-doodle-ay
Life could be a dream
Life could be a dream, sweetheart!

Life could be a dream
If only all my precious plans would come true
If you would let me spend my whole life loving you
Life could be a dream, sweetheart

(dee-oody-ooh, ha-doop, ha-doop)
(dee-oody-ooh, ha-doop, ha-doop)
(dee-oody-ooh, ha-doop, ha-doop)
Sweetheart!!

See the Crew Cuts on YouTube

- Rick

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Thursday Nov 07, 2013

Oracle VM Deep Dives

"With IT staff now tasked to deliver on-demand services, datacenter virtualization requirements have gone beyond simple consolidation and cost reduction. Simply provisioning and delivering an operating environment falls short. IT organizations must rapidly deliver services, such as infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), platform-as-a-service (PaaS), and software-as-a-service (SaaS). Virtualization solutions need to be application-driven and enable:"
  • "Easier deployment and management of business critical applications"
  • "Rapid and automated provisioning of the entire application stack inside the virtual machine"
  • "Integrated management of the complete stack including the VM and the applications running inside the VM."
Application Driven Virtualization, an Oracle white paper

That was published in August of 2011. The new release of Oracle VM Server delivers significant virtual networking performance improvements, among other things. If you're not sure how virtual networks work or how to use them, these two articles by Greg King and friends might help.

Looking Under the Hood at Virtual Networking

by Greg King

Oracle VM Server for x86 lets you create logical networks out of physical Ethernet ports, bonded ports, VLAN segments, virtual MAC addresses (VNICs), and network channels. You can then assign channels (or "roles") to each logical network so that it handles the type of traffic you want it to.

Greg King explains how you go about doing this, and how Oracle VM Server for x86 implements the network infrastructure you configured. He also describes how the VM interacts with paravirtualized guest operating systems, hardware virtualized operating systems, and VLANs.

Finally, he provides an example that shows you how it all looks from the VM Manager view, the logical view, and the command line view of Oracle VM Server for x86.

Fundamental Concepts of VLAN Networks

by Greg King and Don Smerker

Oracle VM Server for x86 supports a wide range of options in network design, varying in complexity from a single network to configurations that include network bonds, VLANS, bridges, and multiple networks connecting the Oracle VM servers and guests. You can create separate networks to isolate traffic, or you can configure a single network for multiple roles. Network design depends on many factors, including the number and type of network interfaces, reliability and performance goals, the number of Oracle VM servers and guests, and the anticipated workload.

The Oracle VM Manager GUI presents four different ways to create an Oracle VM network:

  • Bonds and ports
  • VLANs
  • Both bond/ports and VLANS
  • A local network

This article focuses the second option, designing a complex Oracle VM network infrastructure using only VLANs, and it steps through the concepts needed to create a robust network infrastructure for your Oracle VM servers and guests.

More Resources

photo of K1200S copyright by Rick Ramsey

-Rick

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Monday Sep 16, 2013

Cloud Building with Oracle Solaris 11

Three resources to help you build clouds with Oracle Solaris 11

Training Class - How to Build a Private Cloud with Oracle Solaris 11

by Oracle University

This training class combines multiple enterprise level technologies to demonstrate a full cloud infrastructure deployment using SPARC technology. Learn To:

  • Plan for and deploy a private Infrastructure as a Service cloud
  • Combine various Oracle technologies into a robust cloud infrastructure
  • Practice cloud component creation and configuration tasks by performing a series of guided hands-on labs
  • Perform the critical steps associated with the configuration of cloud and related facilities.

Tech Article - How to Build a Web-Based Storage Solution Using Oracle Solaris 11.1

by Suk Kim

Have you ever wanted to build a cloud just to see if you can? Turns out it's not that difficult. Install Oracle Solaris 11.1 on your laptop via VirtualBox, set up a little ZFS storage, a little access control, and configure AjaXplorer so you and your friends can manage your files. Don't neglect to drop phrases like "Download that from the cloud I just built" into casual conversation.

Tech Article - How to Put Oracle Solaris Zones on Shared Storage for Easy Cloning

We liked this blog so much when Jeff Victor first posted it, that we turned it into a bonafide OTN tech article. You might recognize it. It's about ZOSS: zones on shared storage. Why? When you configure a zone on shared storage, you can quickly clone it on any server that uses that storage. Jeff explains how.

Bonus! - Oracle VM Templates with Oracle Solaris 11

picture of cloud taken in Colorado, copyright Rick Ramsey

- Rick

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Thursday Sep 12, 2013

Should You Consolidate Your Servers Onto Oracle SuperCluster?

"Are you planning to consolidate a server running a business-critical application that you want to update with future releases over upcoming years, or are you trying to get rid of an old server running a legacy application that will not be updated anymore?"

This is just one of the questions Thierry asks in his article, which is a great resource for sysadmins, systems architects, and IT managers who are trying to decide whether to consolidate individual servers onto an Oracle SuperCluster. Your answer will determine whether you should put your application in native or non-native Oracle Solaris zone.

Other questions Thierry and friends ask:

  • Is my server eligible for physical-to-virtual (P2V) migration?
  • Are you planning a long-term or short-term migration?
  • How critical are performance and manageability?

Once he has helped you determine your general direction, he discusses these architectural considerations:

  • SuperCluster domains
  • Network setup
  • VLAN setup
  • Licensing considerations

Finally, he provides a thorough step-by-step instructions for the migration itself, which consists of:

  • Performing a sanity check on the source server
  • Creating a FLAR image of the source system
  • Creating a ZFS pool for the zone
  • Creating and booting the zone
  • Performance tuning

And just in case you're still not sure how it's done, he concludes with an example that shows you how to consolidate an Oracle Solaris 8 Server Running Oracle Database 10g. It's all here, give it a good read:

Technical Article: If Virtualization Is Free, It Can't Be Good, Right?

Article by Thierry Manfé, with contributions from Orgad Kimchi, Maria Frendberg, and Mike Gerdts

Best practices and hands-on instructions for using Oracle Solaris Zones to consolidate existing physical servers and their applications onto Oracle SuperCluster using the P2V migration process, including a step-by-step example of how to consolidate an Oracle Solaris 8 server running Oracle Database 10g.

Video Interview: Design and Uses of the Oracle SuperCluster

Interview with Alan Packer

Allan Packer, Lead Engineer of the Oracle SuperCluster architecture team, as explains how the design of this engineered system supports consolidation, multi-tenancy, and other objectives popular with customers.

By the way, that's a picture of an 01 Ducati 748 that I took in the Fall of 2012.

- Rick

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Monday Aug 05, 2013

Linux Container (LXC) — Part 2: Working With Containers

Containers by Phil Parker, on Flickr
"Containers" by Phil Parker (CC BY 2.0).

Part 1 of this article series provided an overview about the Linux container technology. This second part intends to give you an impression on how to work with containers, by showing a few practical examples. These can be easily followed and reproduced on an up to date Oracle Linux 6 system. For the first steps, it is recommended to install Oracl Linux inside a virtual environment like Oracle VM VirtualBox. Oracle provides a pre-installed and pre-configured Oracle Linux 6 Virtualbox image for free download from the Oracle Technology Network (OTN).

The administration of Linux containers is performed on the command line; so far, there is no integration or support for this technology in applications like Oracle VM Manager or Oracle Enterprise Manager. However, Oracle has developed several enhancements which are included in the lxc package that's part of Oracle Linux 6.4; these changes were also contributed to the upstream LXC project and are now part of the official LXC releases. The support of Linux containers is also included in the libvirt project, which provides a graphical user interface for the management of virtual machines or containers using virt-manager (and other utilities). Libvirt is also included in Oracle Linux.

The creation of Oracle Linux containers can be accomplished on the command line in a few steps, using the LXC utilities. At first, a dedicated directory should be created to host the container file systems. The default location is /container. Creating this directory on top of a Btrfs file system provides a few additional interesting possibilities, e.g. the option to "freeze" a container file system at a certain point in time, or the fast creation (cloning) of additional containers based on a template. Cloning containers using Btrfs snapshots takes place at an instant, without requiring any additional disk space except for the differences to the original template. The creation and management of Btrfs file systems is explained in detail in the chapter "The Btrfs File System" of the "Oracle Linux Administrator's Solutions Guide for Release 6".

The following example creates a Btrfs file system on the second hard disk drive and mounts it to the directory /container:

# mkfs.btrfs /dev/sdb

WARNING! - Btrfs v0.20-rc1 IS EXPERIMENTAL
WARNING! - see http://btrfs.wiki.kernel.org before using

fs created label (null) on /dev/sdb
nodesize 4096 leafsize 4096 sectorsize 4096 size 4.00GB
Btrfs v0.20-rc1

# mdkir -v /container
mkdir: created directory `/container'
# mount -v /dev/sdb /container
mount: you didn't specify a filesystem type for /dev/sdb
I will try type btrfs
/dev/sdb on /container type btrfs (rw)

Now you can create a container of the latest version of Oracle Linux 6 named "ol6cont1" and using the default options by entering the following command. The option "-t" determines the general type of the Linux distribution to be installed (the so-called "template"), e.g. "oracle", "ubuntu" or "fedora". Depending on the template, you can pass template-specific options after the double dashes ("--"). In the case of the Oracle Linux template, you can choose the distribution's version by providing values like "5.8", "6.3" or "6.latest". Further information about the available configuration options can be found in chapter "About the lxc-oracle Template Script" of the Oracle Linux 6 Administrator's Solutions Guide.

# lxc-create -n ol6cont1 -t oracle -- --release=6.latest
/usr/share/lxc/templates/lxc-oracle is /usr/share/lxc/templates/lxc-oracle
Note: Usually the template option is called with a configuration
file option too, mostly to configure the network.
For more information look at lxc.conf (5)

Host is OracleServer 6.4
Create configuration file /container/ol6cont1/config
Downloading release 6.latest for x86_64
Loaded plugins: refresh-packagekit, security
ol6_latest | 1.4 kB 00:00
ol6_latest/primary | 31 MB 01:23
ol6_latest 21879/21879
Setting up Install Process
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package chkconfig.x86_64 0:1.3.49.3-2.el6 will be installed
--> Processing Dependency: libc.so.6(GLIBC_2.4)(64bit) for package: chkconfig-1.3.49.3-2.el6.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libc.so.6(GLIBC_2.3.4)(64bit) for package: chkconfig-1.3.49.3-2.el6.x86_64
[...]
--> Processing Dependency: pygpgme for package: yum-3.2.29-40.0.1.el6.noarch
--> Processing Dependency: python-iniparse for package: yum-3.2.29-40.0.1.el6.noarch
--> Processing Dependency: rpm-python for package: yum-3.2.29-40.0.1.el6.noarch
--> Running transaction check
---> Package audit-libs.x86_64 0:2.2-2.el6 will be installed
---> Package bash.x86_64 0:4.1.2-15.el6_4 will be installed
---> Package checkpolicy.x86_64 0:2.0.22-1.el6 will be installed
---> Package coreutils.x86_64 0:8.4-19.0.1.el6_4.2 will be installed
--> Processing Dependency: coreutils-libs = 8.4-19.0.1.el6_4.2 for package: coreutils-8.4-19.0.1.el6_4.2.x86_64
[...]
---> Package pinentry.x86_64 0:0.7.6-6.el6 will be installed
--> Running transaction check
---> Package groff.x86_64 0:1.18.1.4-21.el6 will be installed
--> Finished Dependency Resolution

Dependencies Resolved

================================================================================
Package Arch Version Repository Size
================================================================================
Installing:
chkconfig x86_64 1.3.49.3-2.el6 ol6_latest 158 k
dhclient x86_64 12:4.1.1-34.P1.0.1.el6 ol6_latest 316 k
initscripts x86_64 9.03.38-1.0.1.el6_4.1 ol6_latest 937 k
[...]
rootfiles noarch 8.1-6.1.el6 ol6_latest 6.3 k
rsyslog x86_64 5.8.10-6.el6 ol6_latest 648 k
vim-minimal x86_64 2:7.2.411-1.8.el6 ol6_latest 363 k
yum noarch 3.2.29-40.0.1.el6 ol6_latest 995 k
Installing for dependencies:
MAKEDEV x86_64 3.24-6.el6 ol6_latest 88 k
audit-libs x86_64 2.2-2.el6 ol6_latest 60 k
basesystem noarch 10.0-4.0.1.el6 ol6_latest 4.3 k
[...]
yum-metadata-parser x86_64 1.1.2-16.el6 ol6_latest 26 k
zlib x86_64 1.2.3-29.el6 ol6_latest 72 k

Transaction Summary
================================================================================
Install 135 Package(s)

Total download size: 79 M
Installed size: 294 M
Downloading Packages:
(1/135): MAKEDEV-3.24-6.el6.x86_64.rpm | 88 kB 00:00
(2/135): audit-libs-2.2-2.el6.x86_64.rpm | 60 kB 00:00
(3/135): basesystem-10.0-4.0.1.el6.noarch.rpm | 4.3 kB 00:00
(4/135): bash-4.1.2-15.el6_4.x86_64.rpm | 904 kB 00:02
(5/135): binutils-2.20.51.0.2-5.36.el6.x86_64.rpm | 2.8 MB 00:07
[...]
(131/135): vim-minimal-7.2.411-1.8.el6.x86_64.rpm | 363 kB 00:01
(132/135): xz-libs-4.999.9-0.3.beta.20091007git.el6.x86_ | 89 kB 00:00
(133/135): yum-3.2.29-40.0.1.el6.noarch.rpm | 995 kB 00:03
(134/135): yum-metadata-parser-1.1.2-16.el6.x86_64.rpm | 26 kB 00:00
(135/135): zlib-1.2.3-29.el6.x86_64.rpm | 72 kB 00:00
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total 271 kB/s | 79 MB 04:59
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
Installing : libgcc-4.4.7-3.el6.x86_64 1/135
Installing : setup-2.8.14-20.el6.noarch 2/135
Installing : filesystem-2.4.30-3.el6.x86_64 3/135
Installing : basesystem-10.0-4.0.1.el6.noarch 4/135
Installing : ca-certificates-2010.63-3.el6_1.5.noarch 5/135
[...]
Installing : rsyslog-5.8.10-6.el6.x86_64 131/135
Installing : yum-3.2.29-40.0.1.el6.noarch 132/135
Installing : passwd-0.77-4.el6_2.2.x86_64 133/135
Installing : 2:vim-minimal-7.2.411-1.8.el6.x86_64 134/135
Installing : rootfiles-8.1-6.1.el6.noarch 135/135
Verifying : gamin-0.1.10-9.el6.x86_64 1/135
Verifying : procps-3.2.8-25.el6.x86_64 2/135
Verifying : 12:dhclient-4.1.1-34.P1.0.1.el6.x86_64 3/135
Verifying : 2:ethtool-3.5-1.el6.x86_64 4/135
Verifying : ncurses-base-5.7-3.20090208.el6.x86_64 5/135
[...]
Verifying : ca-certificates-2010.63-3.el6_1.5.noarch 130/135
Verifying : libssh2-1.4.2-1.el6.x86_64 131/135
Verifying : cpio-2.10-11.el6_3.x86_64 132/135
Verifying : mingetty-1.08-5.el6.x86_64 133/135
Verifying : libcurl-7.19.7-37.el6_4.x86_64 134/135
Verifying : 1:findutils-4.4.2-6.el6.x86_64 135/135

Installed:
chkconfig.x86_64 0:1.3.49.3-2.el6
dhclient.x86_64 12:4.1.1-34.P1.0.1.el6
initscripts.x86_64 0:9.03.38-1.0.1.el6_4.1
openssh-server.x86_64 0:5.3p1-84.1.el6
[...]
Dependency Installed:
MAKEDEV.x86_64 0:3.24-6.el6
audit-libs.x86_64 0:2.2-2.el6
basesystem.noarch 0:10.0-4.0.1.el6
bash.x86_64 0:4.1.2-15.el6_4
binutils.x86_64 0:2.20.51.0.2-5.36.el6
[...]
upstart.x86_64 0:0.6.5-12.el6_4.1
ustr.x86_64 0:1.0.4-9.1.el6
util-linux-ng.x86_64 0:2.17.2-12.9.el6_4.3
xz-libs.x86_64 0:4.999.9-0.3.beta.20091007git.el6
yum-metadata-parser.x86_64 0:1.1.2-16.el6
zlib.x86_64 0:1.2.3-29.el6

Complete!
Rebuilding rpm database
Configuring container for Oracle Linux 6.4
Added container user:oracle password:oracle
Added container user:root password:root
Container : /container/ol6cont1/rootfs
Config : /container/ol6cont1/config
Network : eth0 () on virbr0
'oracle' template installed
'ol6cont1' created

To prepare a miminal installation of the latest version of Oracle Linux 6 (about 400 MB), the installation script performs a download of the required RPM packages from Oracle's "public-yum" service. The directory structure of the installed container can be found at /container/ol6cont1/rootfs, it can be browsed and evaluated like any other regular directory structure. The script also creates two user accounts "root" and "oracle" and configures a virtual network device, which obtains an IP address via DHCP from the DHCP server provided by the libvirt framework. The container's configuration file created by lxc-create is located at /container/ol6cont1/config and can be adapted and modified using a regular text editor. Before making any changes, it's recommended to create a snapshot of the container first, which can be used to quickly spawn additional containers:

# lxc-clone -o ol6cont1 -n ol6cont2
Tweaking configuration
Copying rootfs...
Create a snapshot of '/container/ol6cont1/rootfs' in '/container/ol6cont2/rootfs'
Updating rootfs...
'ol6cont2' created
# lxc-ls -1
ol6cont1
ol6cont2

Start the container using the following command:

# lxc-start -n ol6cont1 -d -o /container/ol6cont1/ol6cont1.log
# lxc-info -n ol6cont1
state: RUNNING
pid: 311
# lxc-info -n ol6cont2
state: STOPPED
pid: -1

The container has now been started in the background. Eventual log messages will be redirected to the file ol6cont.log. As you can tell from the output of lxc-info, only the container ol6cont1 has been started, while the clone ol6cont2 remains in stopped state until you boot it up using lxc-start.

Now you can log into the container instance's console using the following command. The container's system configuration can now be modified using the usual tools (e.g. yum or rpm to install additional software).

# lxc-console -n ol6cont1

Oracle Linux Server release 6.4
Kernel 2.6.39-400.109.4.el6uek.x86_64 on an x86_64

ol6cont1 login: root
Password:
[root@ol6cont1 ~]# ps x
PID TTY STAT TIME COMMAND
1 ? Ss 0:00 /sbin/init
184 ? Ss 0:00 /sbin/dhclient -H ol6cont1 -1 -q -lf /var/lib/dhclien
207 ? Sl 0:00 /sbin/rsyslogd -i /var/run/syslogd.pid -c 5
249 ? Ss 0:00 /usr/sbin/sshd
256 lxc/console Ss+ 0:00 /sbin/mingetty /dev/console
260 ? Ss 0:00 login -- root
262 lxc/tty2 Ss+ 0:00 /sbin/mingetty /dev/tty2
264 lxc/tty3 Ss+ 0:00 /sbin/mingetty /dev/tty3
266 lxc/tty4 Ss+ 0:00 /sbin/mingetty /dev/tty4
267 lxc/tty1 Ss 0:00 -bash
278 lxc/tty1 R+ 0:00 ps x
[root@ol6cont1 ~]# logout
Oracle Linux Server release 6.4
Kernel 2.6.39-400.109.4.el6uek.x86_64 on an x86_64

ol6cont1 login: CTRL-A Q

The key combination CTRL-A, Q terminates the console session. Alternatively, you can also log in to the container using SSH from the host system. All containers have their own IP address and are connected to a virtual bridge device virbr0 by default, which is also reachable from the host system. This way, you can easily set up simple client/server architectures within a host system.

A running container can easily be suspended using the command lxc-freeze at any time. All running processes will be halted and won't consume CPU ressources anymore, until you release them using lxc-unfreeze again. Since Linux containers are based on the Linux Control Groups (Cgroups) framework, it is also possible to precisely limit the resources available to a container.

A container can be shut down using various ways: either by calling lxc-stop from the host, or from within the container using the usual commands like shutdown -h or poweroff. Containers that are no longer needed can be discarded using the lxc-destroy command.

If you'd like to learn more about this topic, there is a dedicated chapter about Linux containers in the Oracle Linux Administrator's Solutions Guide. It covers the creation, configuration and starting/stopping as well as monitoring of containers in detail. It also explains how to prepare the container storage on a Btrfs file system and how existing containers can be quickly cloned.

More links about the topic of Linux containers:

Tuesday Jul 30, 2013

Hands-On Labs for Oracle VM

photo copyright 2013 by Rick Ramsey

Our last virtual sysadmin day was held on July 15. If you missed it, you can still watch the video recordings of the lab sessions on the OTN Garage (aka "Oracle BigAdmin") channel on YouTube.

For instance, these are the videos for the Oracle VM track.

Technology Overview

This session explores the Oracle VM architecture and key features, and introduces the 3 hands-on labs that will follow.

Video - Lab Prep - Downloading and Installing VirtualBox

How to download and install VirtualBox in preparation for the labs.

Video - Lab 1 - Deploying Infrastructure as a Service

Planning and deployment of an infrastructure as a service (IaaS) environment with Oracle VM as the foundation. Storage capacity planning, LUN creation, network bandwidth planning, and best practices for designing and streamlining the environment so that it's easy to manage.

Video - Lab 2 - Deploying Applications Faster Using Templates

How to deploy Oracle applications in minutes with Oracle VM Templates:

  • Find out what Oracle VM Templates are and how they work
  • Deploy an actual Oracle VM Template for an Oracle Application
  • Plan your deployment to streamline on going updates and upgrades.

Video - Lab 3 - Deploying an x86 Enterprise Cloud Infrastructure

This hands-on lab will demonstrate what Oracle's enterprise cloud infrastructure for x86 can do, and how it works with Oracle VM 3.x:

  • How to create VMs
  • How to migrate VMs
  • How to deploy Oracle applications quickly and easily with Oracle VM Templates
  • How to use the Storage Connect plug-in for the Sun ZFS Storage Appliance

Psst!

You can see more unique cars from the Golden Age of American Automobile at the Gateway Automobile Museum.

- Rick

Follow me on:
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Wednesday Jun 26, 2013

Linux-Containers — Part 1: Overview

Containers by Phil Parker, on Flickr
"Containers" by Phil Parker (CC BY 2.0).

Linux Containers (LXC) provide a means to isolate individual services or applications as well as of a complete Linux operating system from other services running on the same host. To accomplish this, each container gets its own directory structure, network devices, IP addresses and process table. The processes running in other containers or the host system are not visible from inside a container. Additionally, Linux Containers allow for fine granular control of resources like RAM, CPU or disk I/O.

Generally speaking, Linux Containers use a completely different approach than "classicial" virtualization technologies like KVM or Xen (on which Oracle VM Server for x86 is based on). An application running inside a container will be executed directly on the operating system kernel of the host system, shielded from all other running processes in a sandbox-like environment. This allows a very direct and fair distribution of CPU and I/O-resources. Linux containers can offer the best possible performance and several possibilities for managing and sharing the resources available.

Similar to Containers (or Zones) on Oracle Solaris or FreeBSD jails, the same kernel version runs on the host as well as in the containers; it is not possible to run different Linux kernel versions or other operating systems like Microsoft Windows or Oracle Solaris for x86 inside a container. However, it is possible to run different Linux distribution versions (e.g. Fedora Linux in a container on top of an Oracle Linux host), provided it supports the version of the Linux kernel that runs on the host. This approach has one caveat, though - if any of the containers causes a kernel crash, it will bring down all other containers (and the host system) as well.

For example, Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 2 (2.6.39) is supported for both Oracle Linux 5 and 6. This makes it possible to run Oracle Linux 5 and 6 container instances on top of an Oracle Linux 6 system. Since Linux Containers are fully implemented on the OS level (the Linux kernel), they can be easily combined with other virtualization technologies. It's certainly possible to set up Linux containers within a virtualized Linux instance that runs inside Oracle VM Server for Oracle VM Virtualbox.

Some use cases for Linux Containers include:

  • Consolidation of multiple separate Linux systems on one server: instances of Linux systems that are not performance-critical or only see sporadic use (e.g. a fax or print server or intranet services) do not necessarily need a dedicated server for their operations. These can easily be consolidated to run inside containers on a single server, to preserve energy and rack space.
  • Running multiple instances of an application in parallel, e.g. for different users or customers. Each user receives his "own" application instance, with a defined level of service/performance. This prevents that one user's application could hog the entire system and ensures, that each user only has access to his own data set. It also helps to save main memory — if multiple instances of a same process are running, the Linux kernel can share memory pages that are identical and unchanged across all application instances. This also applies to shared libraries that applications may use, they are generally held in memory once and mapped to multiple processes.
  • Quickly creating sandbox environments for development and testing purposes: containers that have been created and configured once can be archived as templates and can be duplicated (cloned) instantly on demand. After finishing the activity, the clone can safely be discarded. This allows to provide repeatable software builds and test environments, because the system will always be reset to its initial state for each run. Linux Containers also boot significantly faster than "classic" virtual machines, which can save a lot of time when running frequent build or test runs on applications.
  • Safe execution of an individual application: if an application running inside a container has been compromised because of a security vulnerability, the host system and other containers remain unaffected. The potential damage can be minimized, analyzed and resolved directly from the host system.

Note: Linux Containers on Oracle Linux 6 with the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 2 (2.6.39) are still marked as Technology Preview - their use is only recommended for testing and evaluation purposes.

The Open-Source project "Linux Containers" (LXC) is driving the development of the technology behind this, which is based on the "Control Groups" (CGroups) and "Name Spaces" functionality of the Linux kernel. Oracle is actively involved in the Linux Containers development and contributes patches to the upstream LXC code base.

Control Groups provide means to manage and monitor the allocation of resources for individual processes or process groups. Among other things, you can restrict the maximum amount of memory, CPU cycles as well as the disk and network throughput (in MB/s or IOP/s) that are available for an application.

Name Spaces help to isolate process groups from each other, e.g. the visibility of other running processes or the exclusive access to a network device. It's also possible to restrict a process group's access and visibility of the entire file system hierarchy (similar to a classic "chroot" environment).

CGroups and Name Spaces provide the foundation on which Linux containers are based on, but they can actually be used independently as well.

A more detailed description of how Linux Containers can be created and managed on Oracle Linux will be explained in the second part of this article.

Additional links related to Linux Containers:

- Lenz Grimmer

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Monday Apr 15, 2013

Eight Cylinders of Virtualization

source made freely available by desktop machine

I've been on the lookout for a quick techie overview of Oracle's virtualization offerings. Detlef Drewanz, Matthias Pfützner, and Elke Freymann had strung together a series of articles doing just that. Lenz Grimmer jumped in with some context on Linux, and the result was this 8-part series for OTN.

1 - The Role of Oracle VM Server for SPARC in a Virtualization Strategy

by Matthias Pfützner

Overview of hardware and software virtualization basics, including a breakdown of different types and styles of virtualization, and where Oracle VM Server for SPARC fits into a virtualization strategy.

2- The Role of Oracle VM Server for x86 in a Virtualization Strategy

by Matthias Pfützner

Oracle VM Server for x86 is an Oracle technology that existed before Oracle acquired Sun. It is a virtualization product based on the Xen hypervisor and like its SPARC counterpart, Oracle VM Server for SPARC, it is a thin Type 1 hypervisor that performs hardware virtualization and uses paravirtualization.

3 - The Role of Oracle Solaris Zones and Linux Containers in a Virtualization Strategy

by Detlef Drewanz and Lenz Grimmer

Oracle Solaris zones are referred to as lightweight virtualization because they impose no overhead on the virtualization layer and the applications running in the non-global zones. As a result, they are a perfect choice for high performance applications. Instead of retrofitting efficiency onto full isolation, Linux Containers started out with an efficient mechanism and added isolation, resulting in a system virtualization mechanism as scalable and portable as chroot.

4 - Resource Management As an Enabling Technology for Virtualization

by Detlef Drewanz

When you have one person in one phone booth, life is simple. But when you fit 25 college students into one phone booth, you have resource management challenges. Not to mention security risks. Same goes for virtualization. Detlef explains how resource management can help.

5 - Network Virtualization and Network Resource Management

by Detlef Drewanz

Using hypervisor-based virtualization and Oracle Solaris Zones with network virtualization plus network resource management enables a whole range of network-based architectures. This article describes what's involved in using network resource management in conjunction with hypervisors, containers, and zones in an internal virtual network.

6 - Oracle VM VirtualBox: Personal Desktop Virtualization

by Detlef Drewanz

Oracle VM VirtualBox consists of a base software package that is available for each supported host OS; guest additions that add support for shared folders, seamless window integration, and 3D; and extension packs.

7 - The Role of Oracle Virtual Desktop Infrastructure in a Virtualization Strategy

by Matthias Pfützner

This technology is no longer available.

Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) is the practice of hosting a desktop operating system within a virtual machine (VM) running on a hosted, centralized or remote server. Matthias Pfützner explains.

8 - Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center as a Management Tool for Virtualization

by Elke Freymann

Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center offers complete infrastructure management with a focus on Oracle hardware (servers, switches, storage appliances) and Oracle operating systems, plus non-Oracle Linux variants that are supported on Oracle servers. Although Oracle VM VirtualBox and Oracle VDI include management capabilities, Ops Center has the best overall toolset for central virtualization management.

- Rick

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Thursday Apr 11, 2013

How Oracle Solaris Engineering Thinks: Liane Praza

It's not often you get a glimpse into how the brightest minds at Oracle think (image removed from blog). And Liane is certainly one of the brightest minds at Oracle. In these two short videos (about 2 minutes each), taken at the recent Oracle Solaris Innovations Workshop, she explains:

Video Interview: Why We Build Virtualization Into the OS

Liane Praza explains why Oracle Solaris engineering continues to build virtualization capabilities into the OS instead of adding more features and better management to the hypervisor.

Why The OS Is Still Relevant

Sysadmins are handling hundreds or perhaps thousands of VM's. What is it about Solaris that makes it such a good platform for managing those VM's? Liane Praza, senior engineer in the Solaris core engineering group provides an engineer's perspective.

- Rick

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Monday Mar 04, 2013

What It Takes to Deploy and Manage a Private Cloud

source

That's what your private cloud will look like if you do it wrong. And there are so many things that can go wrong.

Oracle offers several ways to set up your own private cloud. Richard Friedman describes what's involved in not only deploying it with Oracle VM, but managing it.

Article: What It Takes to Deploy and Manage a Private Cloud

Here are three excerpts:

"A few days ago I had dinner with my friend Dave. He’s a systems administrator for his company’s private cloud. Until recently, his company had relied on a mashup of customized applications, scripts, and handwritten procedures for doing everything from allocating storage to users to provisioning virtualized servers, updating and patching operating systems, and deploying applications over the network. He had been complaining for months about the difficulties of trying to satisfy requests from users and clients quickly and how these custom environments were becoming more and more unreliable and difficult to maintain...

"Organizations typically follow a layered approach to implementing a cloud. The proper layering is important not only from an architecture perspective, but also from an organizational perspective. As Dave mentioned, he has specialized storage administrators for managing storage; sysadmins for managing servers and the operating system infrastructure; and database, middleware, and application administrators for higher layers of the stack. "The cloud is like an orchestra," he said; all these performers play in unison, while being still accountable for their respective components...

"Dave also pointed out that to make his new private cloud fully operational, he needed self-service, elasticity, and chargeback capabilities, and the ability to integrate with third-party components, such as a help desk implementation. Moreover, to offer platform as a service (PaaS) capabilities, the infrastructure management has to be done within the context of platform components, such as the database and middleware. This is where Oracle Enterprise Manager fits in. It can work seamlessly with Oracle VM Manager to provide a fully automated, self-service, capacity-on-demand environment."

Don't do it wrong. Read Richard's article.

- Rick

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Monday Feb 18, 2013

Three Oracle VM Hands-On Labs On OTN

source

We put the hands-on labs from the virtualization track of the OTN Virtual Sysadmin Days on OTN.

Lab 1 - Deploying an IaaS Environment with Oracle VM

Planning and deployment of an infrastructure as a service (IaaS) environment with Oracle VM as the foundation. Storage capacity planning, LUN creation, network bandwidth planning, and best practices for designing and streamlining the environment so that it's easy to manage.

Lab 2 - How to Virtualize and Deploy Oracle Applications in Minutes with Oracle VM

How to deploy Oracle applications in minutes with Oracle VM Templates. Find out what Oracle VM Templates are and how they work. Deploy an actual Oracle VM Template for an Oracle application. Plan your deployment to streamline ongoing updates and upgrades.

Lab 3 - Deploying a Cloud Infrastructure with Oracle VM 3.x and the Sun ZFS Storage Appliance

This hands-on lab will demonstrate what Oracle’s enterprise cloud infrastructure for x86 can do, and how it works with Oracle VM 3.x. How to create VMs. How to migrate VMs. How to deploy Oracle applications quickly and easily with Oracle VM Templates. How to use the Storage Connect plug-in for the Sun ZFS Storage Appliance.

By the way, the picture of that ranch in Colorado was taken by my good friend
Mike Schmitz. See more of his photography here. Follow it on Facebook here.

- Rick

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(psst! and don't forget to follow the Great Peruvian Novel!)

Friday Feb 15, 2013

Sysadmins Rejoice! OVM 3.2.1 Includes a Full-Featured CLI

Remember this famous scene from English History? The French accent of the castle guard was so thick I couldn't understand him, but I think that at one point he said "I spit on your graphical user interface." Proof that sysadmins were alive and well in the time of King Arthur.

CLI Documentation

Sysadmins will have cause to taunt English royalty a second time because the command line interface (CLI) of the recently released Oracle VM 3.2.1 has been expanded to include all the capabilities of the (ptui!) graphical user interface (GUI). That means scripts. Boo-yah! It supports public-key authentication, too. Find docs here.

Other Cool Stuff

Oracle VM Manager used to manage only your x86 virtual machines. Now it manages your SPARC systems, too. Create server pools, create virtual machines, and manage networking and storage in the same way, using the same tool. Details here.

You can use MySQL as your backend repository. Just use the Simple installation, which will locally install the default MySQL database that is packaged with the Oracle VM Manager installer. Details here.

You can install the osv-support-tools meta-package for easier integration with Oracle support tools. (sudo is now part of osv-support-tools.) Details here.

More Resources

- Rick

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Thursday Feb 07, 2013

Five Perspectives on Virtual Networks

source

At about the time I finally understood server virtualization, they hit me with network virtualization. Or was it virtualized networks? Virtual networking? So, did that mean that you networked your virtual environments together? Or did it mean that you created a virtual network? A virtual network of virtual servers? Or physical servers?

I did what any techie would do when confronted with a conundrum: I played video games until 2:00 am. Then it came to me: a virtual network is simply a physical network sliced into multiple virtual networks. That wasn't so hard. In fact, we currently provide two ways to create a virtual network: within the OS and at the hypervisor. Shoot, you can even pretend to create a virtual network by firing up VirtualBox. To help you decide which type of network virtualization to use, we put together a few perspectives:

How Networking Works in VirtualBox

by the Fat Bloke

Start here, just in case you want to become familiar with virtual networks to avoid bringing down your entire data center. The Fat Bloke describes how to set up your virtual networks inside VirtualBox and configure them so the physical networks understand what you're trying to do. He covers Network Address Translation (NAT), bridged networking, internal networking, host-only networking, and NAT with Port-forwarding.

Evaluating Oracle Solaris 11 from Inside Oracle VM VirtualBox

by Yuli Vasiliev

Now you can horse around a little bit with the Oracle Solaris virtual network goodies. Yuli Vasiliev explains how to import an Oracle Solaris 11 image into VirtualBox, how to configure the virtual machine settings, and how to explore virtual networking at the OS layer, among other things.

Looking Under the Hood at Networking in Oracle VM Server for x86

by Greg King and Suzanne Zorn

Now you're ready to take a closer look at virtual networking in the hypervisor; specifically, Oracle VM Server for x86. Greg King and Suzanne Zorn describe how you can create logical networks out of physical Ethernet ports, bonded ports, VLAN segments, virtual MAC addresses (VNICs), and network channels. And how to assign channels (or "roles") to each logical network so that it handles the type of traffic you want it to. Very cool read + additional resources.

Which Tool Should I Use to Manage Which Virtualization Technology?

by Ginny Henningsen

Now that you have a better understanding of each method, it's only natural to wonder which tools to use, right? Ginny Henningsen provides an overview of the interfaces and tools that you can use to set up and manage virtual network resources, among other things..

Network Virtualization and Network Resource Management

by Detlef Drewanz

And, if you want to take it a step further, consider adding resource management to your virtual network picture. This article describes what's involved in managing network resources in conjunction with hypervisors, containers, and zones in an internal virtual network.

Let me know if you'd like any more info about virtual networks. We've got a bunch.

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Kemer Thomson
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