Wednesday Nov 11, 2015

Things Be-a-Changin' - "OTN Garage" Will be Called "OTN Systems Hub" Very Soon!

Oracle OpenWorld 2015 | OTN Systems Hub

Hi Y'all,

As I have mentioned a few months ago, the OTN Garage name will be changing to OTN Systems Hub. This is an effort to make the community social channels name be a little bit more easily recognizable to newcomers, and help them understand the contents of the community. We have designed new artwork and logos to go along with this change to highlight the Systems topic areas and improve the communities visibility. To be clear, this isn't an Oracle mandated sales marketing hostile takeover. This is just my effort to help with the community organization and help those newbies find the information that they are looking for. This will have zero impact on the content we create or share. OTN content policy remains the same and we pride ourselves in being a community-centric group that focuses on educational resources and

Changes that are happening very soon:

  1. Twitter: @OTN_Garage will be renamed to @OTNSystemsHub and the artwork/profile pictures will be updated.
  2. Facebook: Page name will change from OTN Garage to OTN Systems Hub, and the cover photo and profile picture will be updated.
  3. YouTube/G+: Channel name will change from OTN Garage to OTN Systems Hub, and the cover photo and profile picture will be updated.
  4. OTN Garage Blog: The blog will be archived and will remain visible here on the community platform via a dedicated section. And a URL redirect will be placed on the old blog URL to forward traffic to the OTN Systems Hub.

If you already follow or like any of those social channels, there is no need to re-like the new name. All existing followers will transfer over. However, the URL to those pages WILL be changing so please update any bookmarks that you may have in your browser or Rolodex once the change has been made. I will keep the links on the OTN Systems Hub updated so if you ever lose 'em, just head over there and re-gram 'em.

Thanks for hanging in there during the transition.

- Logan Rosenstein, OTN Systems Community Manager





Wednesday Oct 07, 2015

Wondering why this blog has been so quiet lately?

So, are you wondering why there hasn't been a lot of posts here lately? Are you? ARE YOU?! It's because the blog has moved to the new community site! To continue following this blog and see all the latest articles and content for SysAdmins and Developers, please visit and subscribe to the OTN Systems Hub.

See you there!

- Logan Rosenstein, OTN Systems Community Manager

Thursday Sep 17, 2015

Who is this new guy? Meet Logan Rosenstein, the new OTN Systems Community Manager.

As many of you know, back in May after a long career in the communities of Sun and Oracle, the great Rick Ramsey announced his retirement. This left such a gaping hole in the OTN Systems community that the amazing staff at Oracle and in the Oracle Technology Network searched day and night to find a magical foot growing potion in an effort to fill those giant shoes.

After an exhaustive search, they decided my size 11s will do and hired me, Logan Rosenstein, as the new OTN Systems Community Manager.

For the last several years, I've worked in various communities and dabbled at IT in the video game industry. When I was able to separate my hands from a video game controller (work related research obviously), I worked on degrees in Business and Computer Science. Now that I've earned the piece of paper that says I have a Masters in Computer Science, I figured it was a good time to join the real world and jump from video game publishing over to Oracle. As a big fan of aviation, I've studied and written about real-time operating systems use in avionics and other embedded systems, network security in the FAA's Next Gen system, and I have great interests in artificial intelligence and its use with computer vision in autonomous vehicles; all of which are great topics to bring up during speed dating.

Over the next several months, you may see some minor changes to the structure of the community, some renaming of forums to make navigation a little easier, and some community infrastructure upgrades to improve the overall experience. Please don't be alarmed, it will likely just be my colleagues and I tinkering around to make sure that the community platform is keeping up with the needs of the members. I will do my very best to explain all the changes, roll them out slowly, and ask for input. If you have anything you would like to see happen, feel free to reach out to me and let me know.

I am extremely excited to be a part of the community and to do my part to help members learn, grow, and communicate. Feel free to reach out to me via any of the OTN Systems social media channels as well as through my community profile. Harmless plug inbound! Please follow the OTN Systems Hub blog, this is where all the new blog posts will be hosted. Don't worry, the OTN Garage blog isn't going anywhere and all its past content will remain available.

About the picture: This is a picture I took of my Chocolate Lab "Gunner" Besides being the best dog on the planet (don't even attempt to argue, I've made my decision and it's final), his expression accurately portrays my own at this very moment as I am welcomed into the OTN family; wide-eyed and focused from excitement, legs spread out to handle the weight of all the responsibilities, completely frazzled hair from stress and covered in water in an attempt to push it back down and look composed. At the end of the day, my eyes are on the prize and I'm ready!

Monday Dec 01, 2014

Update to My Personal Crib Sheet for the ZFS Storage Appliance

In March of 2012 I posted a blog with some resources to help a sysadmin understand the ZFS Storage Appliance. A lot has changed since then, so this is an addendum to that blog. It reflects the latest information in preparation for the release of the ZS4-4.

Recent White Papers About the ZS4

  • Migrating a Database Stored on Fibre Channel (PDF White Paper)
  • Working with the RESTful Management API (PDF White Paper)
  • Deploying 10,000+ VM's on a Single ZFS Appliance (PDF White Paper)
  • Configurations

    It now comes in two variations, instead of the three highlighted in the original blog:

    • ZS3-2 - mid-range storage for the enterprise - cluster option - up to 1.5 PB raw capacity - Hybrid Storage Pools with up to 1 TB DRAM and 12.8 TB of optimized flash cache
    • ZS3-4 - For virtualized environments requiring multiple data services and heterogeneous file sharing - single or cluster - up to 3.5 PB of raw capacity and up to 3 TB DRAM and 12.8 TB of optimized flash cache

    For a high level overview, see this Data Sheet

    Updated Examples of Practical Applications

    For More Information

    About the Photograph

    Winter sunrises can be dramatic in Colorado, but you have to snap pictures quickly, because it happens fast. I took this shot on the last day of November, 2014.


    This post also appears on the Wonders of ZFS Storage blog.

    - Rick

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    Tuesday Nov 11, 2014

    Posted: Lab Instructions for November Virtual Tech Summit

    Instructions for the six Systems labs that will be presented at November's Virtual Technology Summit are now available on the OTN Community Platform.

    Prepare Your Laptops Before the Event

    You need to set up your laptop with the correct VM and configure it before the event begins. If you wait until the event, you'll be too far behind and won't be able to ask questions or join in the discussions.The Oracle VM labs, in particular, require extensive prep work.

    Important Links


    A few thousand have already registered, but slackers can still register in their preferred time zone:

    About the Photograph

    I took the picture of the vertical cylinder from an 01 Ducati 748S on my workbench, while replacing the rings, which I busted while trying to re-install the cylinder without a ring compressor.

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    Friday Oct 24, 2014

    Learn How to Use OpenStack on Oracle Solaris From the Comfort of Your ...

    You're probably heard by now that Oracle Solaris provides a complete implementation of the OpenStack platform. Here's a quick view of the integration, courtesy of Glynn Foster:

    Horizon Cloud Management Dashboard
    OpenStack Component Nova Compute Node Neutron Cloud Networking Cinder/Swift Cloud Storage Glance Image Deployment
    Solaris Component Zones and Kernel Zones Elastic Virtual Switch ZFS Filesystem Unified Archives

    Glynn has prepared two labs showing you how to get OpenStack running on Oracle Solaris. OTN is making them available virtually, with moderators to help you, in November's Virtual Technology Summit. Because they're virtual, you get to decide whether you want to try them out in the crisp mountain air of your fairytale castle in Germany, the convenience of your Manhattan mansion (who dares to be away from Wall Street for very long these days), or even the regal splendor of Windsor Castle, provided you convince the Queen to let you update her internet.

    Lab 1 - How to Deploy OpenStack in 20 Minutes

    Use Unified Archives to quickly provision an OpenStack private cloud on a single node and deploy VM instances based on Oracle Solaris Kernel Zones. The basics of cloud administration through the Horizon web interface, and how to quickly provision both Cinder block and Swift object storage using the ZFS file system. Also how the network virtualization features in Oracle Solaris 11 provide the necessary infrastructure to Neutron networking.

    Lab 2 - Deploy a Secure Enterprise Private Cloud with OpenStack

    Picks up where the first lab left off. Create a golden image environment for an Oracle Database installation using Unified Archives, upload this image to the Glance image repository in OpenStack, and deploy it using Nova compute to a VM instance. How to secure that application in a sandboxed environment using Immutable Zones, and check them for compliance using the integrated framework included in Oracle Solaris 11.

    Register Here

    The Virtual Technology Summit is a lot of fun, but you need to register. It's free. It lasts 4 hours. And it's all technology.

    We'll also have labs for Oracle Linux and Oracle VM. I'll tell you more about those in an upcoming blog.

    More Resources About OpenStack

    If you'd like to do a little background reading before the event, watch:

    About the Photograph

    I don't hang with the Queen, so my digs are a little more modest. I took a picture of that cabin on Route 14 on the way down from Cedar Breaks National Monument, in Utah.

    Follow Rick on:
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    Friday Sep 19, 2014

    Latest Hands-On Lab by Orgad Kimchi: How to Set Up a Hadoop 2 Cluster with Oracle Solaris

    If you're going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair. Especially if it's for Oracle OpenWorld. And while you're there, don't miss Orgad Kimchi's latest hands-on lab.

    Lab: How to Set up a Hadoop 2 Cluster with Oracle Solaris

    In his own words ...

    "This hands-on lab presents exercises that demonstrate how to set up an Apache Hadoop 2 (YARN) cluster using Oracle Solaris 11 technologies such as Oracle Solaris Zones, Oracle Solaris ZFS, and Unified Archive. Key topics include the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) and the Hadoop MapReduce programming model. It also covers the Hadoop installation process and the cluster building blocks: NameNode, Resource Manager, History Server, and DataNodes. In addition, you will see how you can combine the Oracle Solaris 11 technologies for better scalability and data security and will learn how to enable a HDFS high-availability cluster and run a MapReduce job."

    I'll try to convince Orgad to eventually make that lab available to those who of us who can't afford the tickets to Oracle OpenWorld.

    More Gems from Orgad

    Orgad regularly writers terrific articles that show you how to put Oracle Solaris technologies to use in the real world. Here are a few of them:

    About the Photograph

    I took the photograph of a streetcar in San Francisco while sneaking out of the Oracle Solaris reunion I was attending in April of 2014.

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    Monday Sep 15, 2014

    Making Sure Your Exadata Is Running Right

    The service department of a local Harley Davidson dealer has a display that compares a chain driven cam to a gear driven cam. Each type of cam drive is attached to a cam support plate, and the service writer walks you up to the display and invites you to turn each of them. The chain drive is hard to turn, but the gear drive turns easily.

    The message is clear: replace the chain-driven cam in your Harley with a gear-driven cam, and you'll have more power. The display gets the message across brilliantly. Except that it's bogus.

    I've spun the chain drive taken out of a Harley Davidson, and it turns just as easily as the gear drive. Heck, why wouldn't it? In their zeal to convince us of the benefits of gear-driven cams, the boys at the dealership tightened down the chain drive in their display perhaps a bit too enthusiastically.

    Oracle makes some pretty big claims about its engineered systems, too. For instance, you've probably heard something along these lines for the Oracle Exadata Database Machine:

    "An engineered system with preconfigured, pretuned, and pretested hardware and software components that is designed to be the highest performing and most available platform for running Oracle Database."

    How can you know whether these claims are true? Because you have Brian Bream on your side, that's why. Brian is the Chief Technology Officer at Collier IT, and Instructor of the Year for both Oracle University and Sun Microsystems University. He knows his stuff. And he just wrote an article that will interest anyone who manages an Exadata Database Machine.

    Tech Article: Monitoring Oracle Exadata Storage Servers

    by Brian Bream

    The Oracle Exadata Database Machine gives sysadmins three monitoring technologies and two monitoring tools for its storage servers. Brian explains how they work, and how you can use them to monitor metrics, thresholds, and alerts (incidents), how to check the availability of your storage servers, and how to compare metrics for multiple storage servers.

    More From Brian Bream

    About the Photograph

    Photo of the cam chain tensioner on a 2005 Harley Davidson Road King taken by my good buddy Madera Doug.

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    Wednesday Sep 03, 2014

    New Articles for Oracle Solaris Developers

    Even though it was over 10 years ago, I still remember my side of the conversation with Jerry Jackson:

    "Tuple? WTF is a Tuple?"

    Jerry had just finished writing a language for building online insurance applications, and he was filling me in some of the gaps in my street urchin understanding of computer science. What I remember about Jerry's answer all these years later I can only paraphrase as:

    "A tuple is like a grocery list. Except when it's not."

    Although I've been focusing on content for sysadmins for the last few years, developers hold a special place in my heart. And Darryl Gove is one of the most generous with his knowledge. Not too long ago he teamed up with Steve Clamage to write several articles for OTN. Here are three of them:

    Using the New C++ Array and Tuple Containers

    by Darryl Gove and Steve Clamage

    An array is equivalent to a traditional fixed length array in C++, but is accessible through standard container methods. A tuple is an ordered set of related elements of different types, such as one person's name, age, height, and so on. Both are new container types introduced in the C++11 Standard. Darryl and Steve explain what they are and how to use them.

    How to Use Lambda Expressions in C++ 11

    by Steve Clamage and Darryl Gove

    Lambda expressions let you treat functions as objects, which means you can use them when you write a function that requires another function as one of its parameters. According to the authors, Lambdas are one of the defining features of the recent C++11 standard, and in this article they describe their syntax, how to pass them as pointers, and more.

    Understanding the New Set and Map Containers in the C++ 11 Standard Library

    by Darryl Gove and Steve Clamage

    Map and set templates have been part of the C++ Standard Library since C++03. The C++11 Standard Library now includes templates for unordered maps and unordered sets. In some situations, the unordered versions can provide faster lookups than their ordered counterparts. Darryl and Steve explain.

    About the Photograph

    That's JimBob and El Jefe, two of my close riding buddies catching a little warmth from the sun outside of El Paso, Texas, during the now famous Durango Blizzard Ride of 2006. Will have to blog about that some day. They are tuple if there ever was one.

    Follow Rick on:
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    Monday Aug 18, 2014

    Why Wouldn't Root Be Able to Change a Zone's IP Address in Oracle Solaris 11?

    You might assume that if you have root access to an Oracle Solaris zone, you'd be able to change the root's IP address. If so, you'd proceed along these lines ...

    1. First, you'd log in:
    2. root@global_zone:~# zlogin user-zone
    3. Then you'd remove the IP interface:
    4. root@user-zone:~# ipadm delete-ip vnic0
    5. Next, you'd create a new IP interface:
    6. root@user-zone:~# ipadm create-ip vnic0
    7. Then you'd assign the IP interface a new IP address (
    8. root@user-zone:~# ipadm create-addr -a local= vnic0/v4
      ipadm: cannot create address: Permission denied

    Why would that happen? Here are some potential reasons:

    • You're in the wrong zone
    • Nobody bothered to tell you that you were fired last week.
    • The sysadmin for the global zone (probably your ex-girlfriend) enabled link protection mode on the zone with this sweet little command:
    • root@global_zone:~# dladm set-linkprop -p \ protection=mac-nospoof,restricted,ip-nospoof vnic0

    How'd your ex-girlfriend learn to do that? By reading this article:

    Securing a Cloud-Based Data Center with Oracle Solaris 11

    by Orgad Kimchi, Ron Larson, and Richard Friedman

    When you build a private cloud, you need to protect sensitive data not only while it's in storage, but also during transmission between servers and clients, and when it's being used by an application. When a project is completed, the cloud must securely delete sensitive data and make sure the original data is kept secure. These are just some of the many security precautions a sysadmin needs to take to secure data in a cloud infrastructure. Orgad, Ron, and Richard explain the rest and show you how to employ the security features in Oracle Solaris 11 to protect your cloud infrastructure. Part 2 of a three-part article on cloud deployments that use the Oracle Solaris Remote Lab as a case study.

    About the Photograph

    That's the fence separating a small group of tourist cabins from a pasture in the small town of Tropic, Utah.

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    Wednesday Jul 16, 2014

    Get Your ZFS On

    Surprising as it may seem, there are still many sysadmins out there who don't use ZFS or are not familiar with its best features. We (since I'm one of them) should send expensive gifts to Oracle ACE Alexandre Borges. Alexandre loves Solaris so much he can't stop writing about it. He recently put together a torrent of articles about ZFS that, even if you think you know everything about it, you should peruse. Because I bet he's found things you didn't know about.

    I've been posting them at the rate of about one a week. Here are the first five.

    1. Using COMSTAR and ZFS to Configure a Virtualized Storage Environment

    by Alexandre Borges

    How to configure the Common Multiprotocol SCSI TARget (COMSTAR) capability in Oracle Solaris 11 to provide local iSCSI storage to Windows, Linux, and Mac clients.

    2. Playing with Swap Space in ZFS Volumes

    by Alexandre Borges

    Alexandre walks through several ZFS commands that control and monitor swap space, describes the insight they provide, and explains how to use them to increase or decrease swap space.

    3. Playing with ZFS Shadow Migration

    by Alexandre Borges

    If you need to migrate data from a server running Oracle Solaris 10 or 11 to one running Oracle Solaris 11.1, use Shadow Migration. It's easy, and allows you to migrate shared ZFS, UFS, or VxFS (Symantec) file systems through NFS or even through a local file system. Alexandre shows how.

    4. Delegating a ZFS Dataset to a Non-Global Zone

    by Alexandre Borges

    Adding a dataset to a non-global zone does not give the non-global zone's administrator control over the dataset's properties. They are retained by the global zone's administrator. Delegating a dataset, however, does give the non-global zone's administrator control over the dataset's properties. Alexandre explains the difference and how to perform the delegation.

    5. Playing with ZFS Encryption

    by Alexandre Borges

    Oracle Solaris 11 supports native encryption on ZFS so that it can protect critical data without depending on external programs. It's also integrated with the Cryptographic Framework. Alexandre explains the benefits of these and other Oracle Solaris encryption capabilities, and the different methods for encrypting and decrypting files, file systems, and pools.

    About the Photograph

    In late June I rode from the South Entrance to Yellowstone National Park in heavy rain. When I stopped at the grill for a burger, I inadvertently shocked the good patrons by wringing water out of my neck warmer, sweater, and t-shirt directly onto the stone floor in the cafeteria. When I'm on a long ride it takes me a moment to remember the finer points of civilized behavior. When the clouds temporarily cleared, I took this picture of Yellowstone Falls from Uncle Tom's trail.

    - Rick
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    Friday Jul 11, 2014

    What Can You Do With Data Link Multipathing (DLMP)?

    When I first learned about high availability, it was something you provided by creating one or more copies of the operating environment on separate servers. Sometimes on different continents. If the server in Canada failed, the server in Ireland would take over.

    Then I found out about Real Application Clusters. Wait, I asked myself, weren't applications invented for the sole purpose of field-testing the OS? Why do test programs need high availability? Haven't these people heard of Oracle Solaris Cluster?

    Well, to my great disappointment there are plenty of different approaches to high availability. Just like there are plenty of different approaches to virtualization. And, as you might imagine, you can combine the two.

    For instance, if you're going to build a cloud infrastructure using the virtualization capabilities in Oracle Solaris 11, you might as well allocate your network resources to the virtualized environment, as well. And so, you'd probably find yourself creating virtual switches, routers, cards, and what not. Well, what happens if all those virtual networks, which are really just one physical network, go down?

    Bjoern Rost, Oracle ACE, provides a nice explanation of a Solaris feature that didn't get a lot of attention when it was released: Data Link Multipathing (DLMP) and DLMP aggregation. DLMP aggregation allows you to combine virtual network interfaces from different physical network interfaces into high availability clusters. You can also use these clusters to improve load balancing, as Bjoern explains in his blog post.

    Orgad likes DLMP, too. So much, in fact, that he took a break from reconfiguring the International Space Station so his kids could control it from their XBox, and wrote an article explaining how to apply DLMP to a virtual network. Two articles, in fact.

    Tech Article: Using DLMP to Add High Availability to Your Network in Oracle Solaris 11.1

    by Orgad Kimchi

    How to combine virtual NICs from different physical NICS into a DLMP aggregation assigned to a zone, and configure the aggregation to provide failover for the zone, using Oracle Solaris 11.

    Tech Article: Doing More with DLMP

    by Orgad Kimchi

    You can give an Oracle Solaris 11 zone exclusive access to a physical NIC. Although that approach can ensure that particular zone has full access the entire bandwidth of the NIC, it does leave NIC and the entire network exposed to security breaches. Unless you use DLMP's Link Protection capability. Orgad explains how to do that, as well as enabling resource management for your Oracle Solaris 11 virtual network, improving the availability of an NFS server, and more.

    About the Photograph

    Lou Ordorica and I took off early a few weeks ago to get in some twisties before the crowds showed up. We stopped at The Last Shot on the Peak to Peak highway to grab a late breakfast/early lunch. While we were there a few more bikes showed up.

    - Rick
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    Wednesday Jun 25, 2014

    Helping Your Compiler Handle the Size of Your Constants

    by Darryl Gove

    When I use a constant in the following code, I get a warning:

    On the other hand if I wrote:

    Then then compiler will quite happily handle the constant.

    The problem with the first bit of code is that it treats the value as a signed integer, and a signed integer can only hold 31 bits of precision plus a sign bit.

    So how does the compiler decide how to represent a constant? The answer is interesting.

    The compiler will attempt to fit a constant into the smallest value that it can. So it will try to fit the value into these types, in order: into an int, a long int, and then a long long int.

    In the above code sample, the compiler will find that 1 and 31 both fit very nicely into signed ints. There's a shift left operation (<<) in the expression that produces a result of the same type as the left operand. So the whole expression (1<<31) has type signed int, which leads to the the warning.

    To avoid the warning we can tell the compiler that this is an unsigned value. Either by typecasting the 1 to be unsigned in this manner:

    or by declaring it as an unsigned value, like this:

    More About Oracle Solaris Studio

    Oracle Solaris Studio is a C, C++ and Fortran development tool suite, with compiler optimizations, multithread performance, and analysis tools for application development on Oracle Solaris, Oracle Linux, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating systems. Find out more about the Oracle Solaris Studio 12.4 Beta program here.

    About the Photograph

    Photograph of Zion National Park, Utah taken by Rick Ramsey in May 2014 on The Ride to the Sun Reunion.

    - Darryl

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    Tuesday May 06, 2014

    Replay of Solaris Labs From OTN Virtual Sysadmin Day

    Missed OTN's last Virtual Sysadmin Day? That's OK, so did the majority of Earth's 7 billion inhabitants. A stalwart 400 did manage to pull themselves away from The Daily Grind and attend in person. To accommodate the remaining 7 billion slackers, I published videos of the Solaris hands-on labs. I'll do the same for the Oracle Linux and Virtualization sessions over the next few days.

    Lab Intro - How Oracle Solaris 11 Simplifies the Life of a Sysadmin

    Typical tasks and challenges in a sysadmin's work and how Oracle Solaris 11 simplifies them. Managing software packages, updating systems, managing users, monitoring system performance and diagnosing problems, assessing, assigning and redistributing system resources according to workload patterns. Which Oracle Solaris 11 features can help. Examples and best practices. Exercises that model everyday situations.

    Lab 1: Managing the Software Lifecycle with Oracle Solaris 11

    Tricks to help you to manage software packages installed on your systems. Most organizations have separate environments for development, test, QA and production applications. How can you make sure the right versions of software packages are installed in each of them, and avoid inconsistencies? How can you configure your production systems to avoid accidental updates? How should you integrate your software packages with SMF services? These and many other questions will be answered by using practical hands-on examples.

    Lab 2: Managing Your Data with ZFS in Oracle Solaris 11

    ZFS has been a round a long time, but it has so many new capabilities to explore that you might still have a lot of questions. For instance, how do I create a ZFS file system that will have a guaranteed amount of available space, instead of sharing it with other file systems in a pool? What are the best practices for backing up ZFS file systems? How can I use ZFS encryption? Can I create a raw block device on ZFS and why do I need it? These and many other questions will be answered by using practical hands-on examples.

    Lab 3: Managing Virtual Environments in Oracle Solaris 11

    What are the best ways to create and manage zones? How should I use Solaris virtual networking to separate traffic from different applications? How can I monitor and manage system resources assigned to zones? How should I protect my zones from malicious users? How can I migrate zones between hosts? These and many other questions will be answered with practical hands-on examples.

    About the Photograph

    Photo of Las Vegas skyline taken by Rick Ramsey at Collaborate 2014

    - Rick
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    Monday Apr 14, 2014

    Which Type of Virtualization Should I Use?

    I routinely ask techies which type of virtualization they'd recommend for which type of job. I seldom get an answer as crystal clear as Brian Bream's.

    Video Interview: Which Type of Virtualization Should I Use?

    with Brian Bream, CTO Collier IT

    Oracle's portfolio of virtualization technologies includes Oracle VM Server for x86, Oracle VM Server for SPARC (previously known as LDOMS), and Oracle Solaris Zones, among others. Brian Bream provides a crystal clear technical overview of their differences and examples of what you would use them to do to. After you listen to the recording, which is about 5 minutes long, you'll understand why Brian was selected Instructor of the Year for both Oracle University and Sun Microsystems University before that.

    More Resources About Virtualization

    Here's an 8-part series about Oracle virtualization products written by Detlef Drewanz and Lenz Grimmer that might also be helpful:

    About the Photograph

    Photograph of Vaillancourt Fountain in San Francisco taken by Rick Ramsey, April 2014.

    - Rick

    Follow me on:
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    Logan Rosenstein
    and members of the OTN community


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