Thursday Apr 04, 2013

The Screaming Men of Finland and Oracle SPARC Chips

source

In response to the release of Oracle's SPARC T5 and M5 chips, which are dramatically faster than those of IBM, IBM responded by saying that speed was not as important as other qualities. Forbes begged to differ:

Forbes Article: For Big Data Customers, Top Performance Means High Speed And Low Cost

Assuming you agree, you'll be interested in some dyno runs of not only our SPARC chips, but also our applications running on them. Did I say dyno runs? I'm sorry, I meant benchmarks.

World's Fastest Database Server

Oracle’s new SPARC mid-range server running Oracle Solaris is the fastest single server for Oracle Database:

  • Oracle’s SPARC T5-8 is the fastest single server for Oracle Database
  • Oracle's SPARC T5-8 server has a 7x price advantage over a similar IBM Power 780 configuration for database on a server-to-server basis.
See Benchmarks Results Here
Why Oracle Database runs best on Solaris

World's Fastest Server for Java

As you might expect, Java runs fastest on Oracle servers.

SPECjEnterprise2010 Benchmark World Record Performance
SPECjbb2013 Benchmark World Record Result
Why Solaris is the best platform for Enterprise Java

Optimizations to Oracle Solaris Studio COmpilers

The latest release of Oracle Solaris Studio includes optimizations for the new SPARC chips in its compilers. Larry Wake has more:

Blog: Oracle Solaris and SPARC Performance - Part I

I'll Optimize Yours If You Optimize Mine

Since the Solaris and SPARC engineers get along so well, they have each optimized their technologies for each other:

SPARC Optimizations for Oracle Solaris
Oracle Solaris Optimizations for SPARC

Happy Burnouts.

- Rick

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Wednesday Apr 03, 2013

Miss MoneyPenny and the Oracle Solaris 11 Provisioning Assistant

source

In the following video, Bart Smaalders, from the Oracle Solaris core engineering team, explains why they decided not to provide a direct upgrade path from Oracle Solaris 10 to Oracle Solaris 11, and the best way for a data center to perform an indirect upgrade.

VIDEO INTERVIEW: Why Engineering Did Not Provide a Direct Upgrade Path to Oracle Solaris 11

Miss MoneyPenny to the Rescue

If you saw Skyfall, you probably noticed two things. First, that the latest Miss Moneypenny is a lot more interesting than past Miss Moneypennies. Second, that she's always there when 007 needs her.

Just like Oracle Solaris 10.

Oracle Solaris 10 has just released a nifty tool called Oracle Solaris 11 Provisioning Assistant. It lets you run the automated installer from Oracle Solaris 11 on a Solaris 10 system. That means you can set up an IPS (Image Packaging System) repository on your Solaris 10 system, and use it to provision one or more Solaris 11 systems.

In fact, if you have already set up a JumpStart server on your Solaris 10 system, you can use it to provision the Solaris 11 systems. Kristina Tripp and Isaac Rozenfeld have written an article that explains how:

TECH ARTICLE: How to Use an Existing Oracle Solaris 10 JumpStart Server to Provision Oracle Solaris 11 11/11

Note:
The Provisioning Assistant only provisions Solaris 11 11/11 systems. It does not provision Solaris 11.1, and there are no plans to extend its functionality to provision future releases of Oracle Solaris 11. Once you have set up your Solaris 11 system, use its automated installer to provision systems with the Solaris 11.1 or future releases. For more info, see the Upgrading to Oracle Solaris 11.1 documentation.

- Rick

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Wednesday Mar 27, 2013

Why Become a Solaris Sysadmin?

On the one hand Oracle is telling you that Solaris is the key component of the Oracle stack, that we've been investing heavily in it, and that it provides the best platform for managing the stack. Watch these videos:

On the other hand, we are telling your boss to buy our engineered systems because they'll not only reduce the complexity of managing the data center, but they'll need fewer sysadmins to run them.

So, which is it?

Video Interview: Why Become a Solaris Sysadmin?

I asked Larry Wake, Solaris old-timer. Tell me what you think of his answer.

Video Interview: Why Become A Solaris Sysadmin?.

A year or two ago, Justin asked Marshall Choy a similar question. Watch that video here:

Video Interview: Impact of Engineered Systems on the Sysadmin

- Rick

Follow me on:
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Monday Feb 11, 2013

Oracle Solaris 10 Still Rocks

source

When it was launched back in 05, Oracle Solaris 10 rocked the IT world. I heard a rumor that Scott tried to launch it at a Rolling Stones concert, but apparently Mick Jagger didn't think operating systems were sexy.

Operating systems not sexy? Since when?

Well, Mick, when was the last time you released a new album? Oracle Solaris 10 released one last Friday, pal.

Oracle Solaris 10 1/13 Release

The new release is integrated with My Oracle Support. As a result, you can view the system configuration, asset inventory, and change history of your Solaris systems on the support portal, along with the results of the health checks that Oracle Support performs. (Kinda like letting a pregnant woman have access to continuous ultrasound via her cell phone, huh?)

This support will be available for Oracle Solaris 10 through 2018. After that, it will be supported through Oracle's Lifetime Support Policy.

There's plenty more:

Technical Resources

Friday Jan 18, 2013

Once Upon a Time in the Kingdom of Serv

If you're the type of person who has no time to read fairy tales, scroll to the very bottom for a link to the article.

Once upon a time there was a very happy Kingdom called Serv. It was ruled by inventors called engineers. Most of the engineers were clever, kind, and handsome. They had beautiful wives who cooked them tasty and nutritious meals.

A few of the engineers, however, had wives with big, hairy, purple moles, who sat around all day watching reruns of Bridezilla while chomping loudly on pork rinds. They never served their engineer husbands any meals and instead, screamed at them to get them another bag of pork rinds. And they hated sysadmins.

Sysadmins were the workers of the Kingdom. They were very playful, and they had big strong hands. They spent their days tossing servers back and forth to each other, or playing hacky sack.

The Kingdom was a happy place because the clever, kind, and handsome engineers had long ago invented a wonderful contraption called, as you would expect, a "server." Servers were loved throughout the Serv kingdom and all the surrounding kingdoms. They came in shiny metal boxes and had blinking lights. Best of all, they had straight edges so that sysadmins could toss them back and forth to each other. Sysadmins loved tossing servers back and forth to each other, and at lunch time it was not uncommon for several servers to be in the air at once. But when a sysadmin dropped a server, it usually broke. And when a server broke, it was called a "failure." And a failure always woke up The Boss.

The Boss was a hairy ugly giant with one eye. He did only two things. He slept. And he fired sysadmins for waking him up. Naturally, everybody preferred to keep the boss asleep. Especially sysadmins.

Polite people in the Kingdom never mentioned the word "failure" at dinner parties, not even in a whisper, lest they unwittingly awaken The Boss. But everybody knew that if sysadmins began to appear on their sofas in the middle of the night, somewhere in the Kingdom a failure had occurred.

The wives of the clever, kind, and handsome engineers begged their husbands to do something about the plight of the playful sysadmins. And so the clever, kind, and handsome engineers invented the cluster. A cluster was an enchanted cable that connected groups of servers in a magical way. When one server was dropped by a sysadmin, the cable moved that server's applications to another server so fast that nobody had time to even think of saying "failure," much less say it loud enough to wake The Boss. When the dropped server was fixed, the enchanted cable moved that server's applications back.

And so the Kingdom was full of happy sysadmins tossing servers back and forth during lunch, and sleeping in their very own beds at night.

This turn of events, of course, made the pork rind and Bridezilla wives jealous. During the commercials they screeched at their browbeaten husbands until they invented a curse to get the sysadmins fired again and back on the sofas of the beautiful wives who cooked their engineer husbands tasty and nutritious food.

It was an unspeakable curse, and polite people at dinner parties didn't dare to even whisper its name. When this curse was unleashed upon the Kingdom, all the beautiful metal servers disappeared. Except one. And inside that one server were trapped the spirits of all the other servers. The sysadmins stood around staring at it, wondering of what use their big strong hands were when the servers no longer had bodies.

One by one the sysadmins grew sad and left, and in no time at all, almost all the clever, kind, and handsome engineers had sysadmins sleeping on their sofas again.

The Kingdom was not a happy place.

Until one day, it occurred to the cleverest, kindest, and most handsome of the clever, kind, and handsome engineers to put a spell on the enchanted cable so that it could do the same thing for the spirit servers that it once did for the physical servers.

It was a wonderful invention, and the sysadmins jumped off their sofas to learn how to use it. And to keep the pork rind-chomping, Bridezilla-watching wives of the browbeaten engineers guessing, the enchanted cable could be used in two different ways:

Two Ways to Create a Cluster from Logical Domains

  • Configure logical domains within Oracle Solaris Cluster
  • Configure Oracle Solaris Cluster within Oracle VM Server for SPARC

The first approach is fairly obvious. You can put one or more applications inside each domain and create a cluster from all the domains. When a particular domain goes down, the applications running inside it get moved to a working domain. The domains are controlled individually through Oracle VM Server for SPARC, and the cluster is controlled by Oracle Solaris Cluster.

The second approach is more involved, but it provides significant benefits. It consists of setting up Oracle Solaris Cluster inside the control domain of Oracle VM Server for SPARC. When deployed this way, Oracle Solaris cluster can manage guest domains as "black boxes," which allows a site to isolate the administration of guest domains from each other. With this approach, from within Oracle Solaris Cluster you can:

  • Create guest domains
  • Live- and warm-migrate the guest domains
  • And manage individual applications like you can with the first approach

The second approach is well documented. In fact, Venkat Chennuru, a sysadmin with big strong hands who was elevated to the rank of clever, kind, and handsome engineer, took the trouble to write it down for us. You can find his article on OTN:

How to Configure a Failover Guest Domain in an Oracle Solaris Cluster

Read it, learn how to do it. Because as you know, evil never rests.

- Rick

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Tuesday Aug 16, 2011

Ginny Had A Bright Idea

image courtesy of Twenty Words

In the Olden Days before most of us were born, if a woman got a bright idea she got an immediate spanking from John Wayne. Thank goodness John Wayne has stopped doing that, or we wouldn't get to reap the benefits of the research Ginny Henningsen did with Oracle Solaris 11.

When Ginny read about all the different ways to download, install, patch, and manage updates in Solaris 11, she wasn't sure where to start. So she drew on her personal experience, the experience of other sysadmins and systems engineers, the documentation, and the related technical articles posted on OTN.

The result? These three very practical articles.

Article 1
Best Way To Update Software Using IPS in Oracle Solaris 11

The SVR4 packaging and patching systems in earlier versions of Solaris were designed by the Chosen for the Faithful. If you loved SunOS you could recite package nomenclature in your sleep and you always, always used the command line. Alas, nobody loves software for its own sake any more. At least, not enough of us do. And so, the latest version of Solaris does away with the mystery, the animal sacrifice, the practice of witchcraft, and the other requirements for mastery of earlier versions. Read how Ginny put away her potions and figured out the best way to use the new tools.

Article 2
Best Way to Automate ZFS Snapshots and Track Software Updates in Oracle Solaris 11

Boot environments in Solaris 11 perform a function similar to Live Upgrade environments in Oracle Solaris 10. Except that they're implemented with ZFS. Which means you can generate snapshots of your boot environments at every point you'd like to record. And the beauty of that is, of course, that you can return to any snapshot of the boot environment that you want to use. In this article, Ginny introduces TimeSlider, shows you how to configure it to take automatic snapshots, and explains how to keep a record of the software updates that have been made to the current boot environment.

Article 3
Best Way to Update Software in Oracle Solaris 11 Zones

Before the Zone there was the Container. And before the Container, the Zone. This is The Way of Software. In her third "Best Way" article, Ginny figures out the best way to manage software updates in Solaris 11 zones which, as you might expect, are different from Solaris 10 zones. After showing you those differences, she shows you how to create, configure, install, and clone a Solaris 11 zone, then how to upgrade both the global and non-global zones. As a bonus, you get to find out what to do if something goes wrong.

We're expecting more "Best Way" articles from Ginny down the road. So read these, try out their recommendations yourself, and tell us what you think.

And don't forget to save the lemur!

- Rick
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Kemer Thomson
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