Friday Apr 05, 2013

Migrating to Oracle Linux: How to Identify Applications To Move

source

One of the first things you need to make when migrating from SUSE Linux to Oracle Linux is an inventory of your applications. A package management tool such as Yet Another Setup Tool (YAST) is a big help here. So is the rpm command. Here are some ways to use it.

To List All The Installed Packages

Use the -qa option.

# rpm –qa
filesystem-11.1.3.5.3
sles-release-DVD-11.2.1.234
...

To Save the Output in a File

You can move that file to any location and, anytime later,search through the package list saved there to look for a package of interest:

# rpm –qa > rpmlist.txt

To Sort the Packages

To see the installed packages sorted by install time, use --last. The packages installed most recently will appear at the top of the list, followed by the standard packages installed during the original installation:

# rpm –qa --last
VirtualBox-4.2-4.2.6_82870_sles11-0-1
...

To Find Out If A Particular Component Is Installed

To find out whether a particular component is installed and what version it is, use the name option. For example:

# rpm –qa python
python-2.6.0-8.12.2

To Find Out What Dependencies a Package Has

Use the -qR option:

# rpm –qR python-2.6.0-8.12.2
python-base = 2.6.0
rpmlib(VersionedDependencies) <= 3.0.3-1
...

The Linux Migration Guide

You can find out more about migration steps with either rpm or YaST, including the benefits of migrating to Oracle Linux, by downloading the white paper from here:

Download the Oracle Linux Migration Guide

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Friday Feb 22, 2013

How to Configure the Linux Kernel's Out of Memory Killer

source

Operating systems sometimes behave like airlines. Since the airlines know that a certain percentage of the passengers won't show up for their flight, they overbook the flights. As anyone who has been to an airport in the last 10 years knows, they usually get it wrong and have to bribe some of us to get on the next flight. If the next flight is the next morning, we get to stay in a nice hotel and have a great meal, courtesy of the airline.

That's going to be my lodging strategy if I'm ever homeless.

Linux kernel does something similar. It allocates memory to its processes ahead of time. Since it knows that most of the processes won't use all the memory allocated to them, it over-commits. In other words, it allocates a sum total of memory that is more than it actually has. Once in a while too many processes claim the memory that the kernel promised them at the same time. When that happens, the Linux kernel resorts to an option that the airlines wish they had: it kills off processes one at a time. In fact, it actually has a name for this function: the out-of-memory killer.

Robert Chase explains.

How to Configure the Out of Memory Killer

Robert Chase describes how to examine your syslog and how to use the vmstat command for clues about which processes were killed, and why. He then shows you how to configure the OOM killer to behave the way you prefer. For instance, you can make certain processes less likely to be killed than others. Or more. Or you can instruct the kernel to reboot instead of killing processes.

More Oracle Linux Resources

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube

(psst! and don't forget to follow the Great Peruvian Novel!)

Thursday Feb 21, 2013

Can You Figure Out Which Teenager Took the Cash?

source

Dads like me are familiar with a phenomenon known as Silent Dollar Disappearance. This tends to occur when there is a confluence of money in your wallet and teenage children in your home. You never actually see it happen, but if you are paying attention, you might detect that it has happened. As when, for instance, you try to pay for beer and brats at the grocer. It becomes difficult to know for sure whether it was the teenagers. What if you already spent the money on something else? That's what my teenage daughters always said. Or perhaps you had a wallet malfunction, and it flew out. So difficult to pin-point the actual cause.

Linux, like any OS, is vulnerable to a similar phenomenon. It's called silent data corruption. It can be caused by faulty components, such as memory modules or storage systems. It can also be caused by -God forbid- administrative error. As with Silent Dollar Disappearance, it's difficult to detect when data corruption is actually happening. Or what the exact cause was. But, as with Dads and teenagers, you eventually figure out that it has happened.

It may be impossible to identify the culprit after the data has been corrupted, but it's not impossible to stop the culprit ahead of time. Oracle partnered with EMC and Emulex to do just that. And they were kind enough to explain how the did it and how you can benefit. In this article:

Preventing Silent Data Corruption in Oracle Linux

An excerpt ...

"Data integrity protection is not new. ECC and CRC are available on most, if not all, servers, storage arrays, and Fibre Channel host bus adapters (HBAs). But these checks protect the data only temporarily within a single component. They do not ensure that the data you intended to write does not become corrupt as it travels down the data path from the application running in the server to the HBA, the switch, the storage array, and then the physical disk drive. When data corruption occurs, most applications are unaware that the data that was stored on the disk is not the data that was intended to be stored.

"Over the last several years, EMC, Emulex, and Oracle have worked together to drive and implement the Protection Information additions to the T10 SBC standard, which enables the validation of data as it moves through the data path to ensure that silent data corruption does not occur."

Interesting stuff. Give it a read.

- Rick

Follow us on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube

(psst! and don't forget to follow the Great Peruvian Novel!)

Wednesday Aug 15, 2012

It's Better with Btrfs

source

Two recently published articles to help you become proficient with the Btrfs file system in Oracle Linux:

How I Got Started with the Btrfs File System in Oracle Linux

By Margaret Bierman

Scalability and volume management. Write methodology and access. Tunables. Margaret describes these capabilities of the Btrfs file system, plus how it deals with redundant configurations, checksums, fault isolation and much more. She also walks you through the steps to create and set up a Btrfs file system so you can become familiar with it.

How I Use the Advanced Features of the Btrfs File System

By Margaret Bierman

How to create and mount a Btrfs file system. How to copy and delete files. How to create and manage a redundant file system configuration. How to check the integrity of the file system and its remaining capacity. How to take snapshots. How to clone. And more. In this article Margaret explores the more advanced features of the Btrfs file system.

Let us know what you think, and what you'd like to see Margaret write about in the future.

- Rick

Website Newsletter Facebook Twitter

Tuesday Jul 17, 2012

How to Protect Your Oracle Linux System from the Higgs Boson

Now that the Higgs Boson particle has been gently coaxed out of hiding, you know what's gonna happen, don't you? Your boss is gonna walk into your office and demand a plan for protecting your Oracle Linux system against it.

You could act like a smart aleck sysadmin and inform him or her that it took a team of scientists 10 years and 500 trillion collisions to get conclusive evidence of its existence, and let's not even talk about how difficult it was for God to create the elusive thing, but that would violate the first law of corporate survival:

Never, ever make your boss look stupid

Instead, jump out of your chair and say "OMG! I hadn't though of that!" Then read our latest article and use what you learn to write up a plan that will make your boss look real good to his or her boss. (Just make sure your name appears nowhere.)

Tips for Hardening an Oracle Linux Server

Lenz Grimmer and James Morris provide guidelines for:

  • Minimizing the software footprint
  • Minimizing active services
  • Locking down network services
  • Disabling or tightening use of SSH
  • Configuring mounts, file permissions, and ownerships
  • Managing Users and Authentication
  • Other Security Features and Tools
  • Cryptography
I hope you enjoy reading the article as much as I did. And good luck with your career.

- Rick

Website Newsletter Facebook Twitter

Friday Mar 16, 2012

Oracle Linux Forum

This forum includes live chat so you can tell Wim, Lenz, and the gang what you really think.

Linux Forum - Tuesday March 27

Since Oracle recently made Release 2 of its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel available (see Lenz's blog), we're following up with an online forum with Oracle's Linux executives and engineers. Topics will be:

9:30 - 9:45 am PT
Oracle's Linux Strategy

Edward Screven, Oracle's Chief Corporate Architect and Wim Coekaerts, Senior VP of Linux and Virtualization Engineering, will explain Oracle's Linux strategy, the benefits of Oracle Linux, Oracle's role in the Linux community, and the Oracle Linux roadmap.

9:45 - 10:00 am PT
Why Progressive Insurance Chose Oracle Linux

John Dome, Lead Systems Engineer at Progressive Insurance, outlines why they selected Oracle Linux with the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel to reduce cost and increase the performance of database applications.

10:00 - 11:00 am PT
What's New in Oracle Linux

Oracle engineers walk you through new features in Oracle Linux, including zero-downtime updates with Ksplice, Btrfs and OCFS2, DTrace for Linux, Linux Containers, vSwitch and T-Mem.

11:00 am - 12:00 pm PT
Get More Value from your Linux Vendor

Why Oracle Linux delivers more value than Red Hat Enterprise Linux, including better support at lower cost, best practices for deployments, extreme performance for cloud deployments and engineered systems, and more.

Date: Tuesday, March 27, 2012
Time: 9:30 AM PT / 12:30 PM ET
Duration: 2.5 hours
Register here.

- Rick

Tuesday Mar 13, 2012

Who the Linux Developer Met on His Way to St. Ives

For some reason I still remember this nursery riddle:

"As I was going to Saint Ives
I met a man with seven wives
Each wife had seven sacks
Each cat had seven cats
Each cat had seven kits
How many were going to St Ives?

The answer, of course, is one. More about the riddle here.

Little did I know, when I first learned it, that this rhyme would help me understand the Oracle Exadata Database Machine. Miss Blankenship, please forgive me:

As I was going to St Ives
I met a man with 8 Oracle Exadata Machines
Each machine had 8 sockets
Each socket had 8 cores
Each core had 2 threads
How many CPU's were going to St Ives?

If your i-phone has hobbled you to the point that you can no longer do simple arithmetic in your head, you can get the answer to that riddle by listening to these podcasts (the first one even provides notes):

Podcast: How Oracle Linux Was Optimized for the Oracle Exadata Database Machine

Turns out that when you use off-the-shelf components to build a NUMA system like the Exadata, you lower your hardware costs, but you increase the software work that must be done to optimize the system. Oracle Linux already had a set of optimizations well suited to this task. Chris Mason, director of Linux kernel engineering at Oracle, describes the process engineering used to optimize Exadata's integrated stack, touching everything from storage, to networking, the CPU, I/O speeds, and finally the application. Great Q&A, too.

Podcast: What's So Great About Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel?

It's easy to replace your tired rust-bucket of a Linux kernel with the chromed-out Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel from Oracle, but why would you? Sergio Leunissen, Oracle Vice President, and Lenz Grimmer, blogger extraordinaire, explain why it's worth your time to use the Unbreakable Linux Kernel. Sergio and Lenz explain why Oracle went to the trouble to engineer its own kernel, what's included in Release 2, how it is tested, how it is optimized for the Oracle stack, the close relationship with the Linux community, and what benefits it brings developers and sysadmins.

Where to Get It, How to Use It

As you may have already heard, Release 2 of Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux is now available. Here are some resources to help you get started.

- Rick with Todd Trichler

Website

Newsletter

Facebook

Twitter

Tuesday Feb 28, 2012

Santa Clara On April 10 - Next OTN Sysadmin Day

Before the part of Oracle that was then Sun Microsystems moved in, the facility used to be known as the Agnews Insane Asylum. Some of us who worked for Sun at the time thought the image was hilarious. Some thought it was insensitive. Some believed it was a statement about the rise of the corporate state and the demise of benign government. That was the Santa Clara campus back then, a diverse, magical workplace full of people who held strong opinions about everything, yet managed to have a great time together.

Another topic that incites strong opinions among good friends is Oracle Solaris vs Oracle Linux. Which one is better? Which one should I use? Which one should I learn how to use? At our OTN Sysadmin Days, we let you decide. Pavel Anni always opens our OTN Sysadmin Days with a talk about Oracle's dual OS strategy. He explains why Oracle offers two operating systems, and summarizes the main features of each one. Then we split off into two different groups to get our hands on each OS.

One group gets their hands on the ZFS filesystem, virtualization capabilities, and security controls of Oracle Solaris.

The other group gets their hands on the package management tools, services, and runs levels of Oracle Linux, plus its volume management tools and the Btrfs filesystem.

The truly adventurous sysadmins jump between groups. Both groups learn by doing, using the hands-on labs similar to those on OTN's Hands-On Labs page. Why attend an event in person when you could simply work the labs on your own? Two reasons:

  1. Since you are away from the obligations of the data center, you get to focus on working the labs without interruption.
  2. You get help from Oracle experts and other sysadmins who are working on the same labs as you.

I've been to all our OTN Sysadmin Days so far. The sysadmins and IT managers who attended told me that it was time very well spent. However, our attendance has been low. Not sure whether we haven't gotten the word out to enough people, or whether it's just difficult for sysadmins to get away. In any case, if we don't improve attendance, we'll have to cancel OTN Sysadmin Days.

So if you're interested, register now. Santa Clara on April 10 may be your last chance. The event is free. Here's the agenda:

Time Session
8:00 am System Shakedown
9:00 am Oracle's Dual OS Strategy
 

Oracle Solaris Track

Oracle Linux Track

10:00 am HOL: Oracle Solaris ZFS HOL: Package Management and Configuration
11:30 am HOL: Virtualization HOL: Storage Management
1:00 pm Lunch / Surfing OTN
2:00 pm HOL: Oracle Solaris Security HOL: Btrfs filesystem
3:00 pm Presentation: Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 11g
3:30 pm Presentation: Setting Up and In-House Development Environment with Oracle Solaris Studio
4:00 pm Discussion: What are the most pressing issues for sysadmins today?
5:00 pm We all go home

- Rick Ramsey

Website

Newsletter

Facebook

Twitter

Wednesday Jan 25, 2012

Does Your Weekend Workload Look Like This?

We have a couple of resources to help you dive under.

Article: How Dell Migrated From SUSE Linux to Oracle Linux

In June of 2010, Dell made the decision to migrate 1,700 systems from SUSE Linux to Oracle Linux, while leaving the hardware and application layers unchanged. Suzanne Zorn worked with Jon Senger and Aik Zu Shyong, from Dell, to understand exactly how Dell did it. In this article, they describe Dell's server environment, the migration process, and what they learned. The article covers:

  • Preparation, including the use of a "scratch" area
  • Archiving configuration files
  • Conversion of MPIO to PowerPath with a custom script
  • Re-imaging the new OS and installing with kickstart
  • Restoring the configuration files
  • Adjusting profiles
  • Restarting database and applications, and verifying correct operation.

More about Oracle Linux here.

Demo: Update the Oracle Linux Kernel with Ksplice

Waseem Daher uses the command line to demonstrate how you can use Ksplice to install kernel updates to Oracle Linux without rebooting, even while your applications are still running. He also shows you how to use the Uptrack utility in Ksplice to manage your Linux packages more easily. It's only 18 minutes long, and well worth your time.

Why big wave surfers do it.

- Rick
Website
Newsletter
Facebook
Twitter

Tuesday Jan 03, 2012

Next OTN Sysadmin Day is on January 18

Our next OTN Sysadmin Day will be held on January 18 in Salt Lake City, Utah. As usual, we will have two tracks of hands-on-labs:

Time Session
8:00 am System Shakedown
9:00 am Oracle's Dual OS Strategy / Overview of OTN
 

Oracle Solaris Track

Oracle Linux Track

10:00 am HOL: ZFS HOL: managing packages, configuring services
11:30 am HOL: Exploring OS, network, and storage virtualization HOL on Storage Part I: managing storage and file systems
1:00 pm Lunch Break
2:00 pm HOL: Managing software with IPS HOL on Storage Part II: Device Mapper, BTRFS
3:00 pm Presentation: Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 11g
4:00 pm Discussion: What are the most pressing issues for sysadmins today?
5:00 pm We all go home

Participants of previous OTN Sysadmin Days found the hands-on labs particularly valuable. You get to learn by doing. And what you get to do is install, configure, and manage the technologies of Oracle Solaris 11 and Oracle Linux in the same way as you would in the real world.

OTN Sysadmin Day in Salt Lake City is free, but you must register. Please stay for the feedback session at the end. They tend to be pretty spirited, and you might win a neat prize. Address:

Salt Lake City Marriott City Center
220 South State Street
Salt Lake City, UT 84111

If you'd like to see some pictures from the Sacramento event, go to the "OTN Sysadmin Day Sacramento" photo folder on the OTN Garage on Facebook.

To find out what there is to do is Salt Lake City and Utah, click on the ski page above. It will take you to National Geographic's Guide to Utah.

- Rick
Website
Newsletter
Facebook
Twitter

Friday Dec 16, 2011

Two Sysadmin Articles Make OTN's Top 20

In the OTN blog, Justin reports that two sysadmin-related articles made OTN's top 20 list for 2011:

Number 2
Taking Your First Steps with Oracle Solaris 11
- by Brian Leonard and Glenn Brunette

Number 11
How I Simplified the Installation of Oracle Database on Oracle Linux
- by Ginny Henningsen

Boo-yah!

The good work of Brian, Glenn, and Ginny makes those of us in the Systems Community of OTN particularly proud because the number of OTN readers who are system admins and developers is dwarfed by the number who are Java developers. Even making the top 20 is notable. To Brian, Glenn, and Ginny, a heartfelt:

- Rick

Website
Newsletter
Facebook
Twitter

Tuesday Sep 27, 2011

Linux-Related Content and Roadmap at Oracle OpenWorld

Interested in the Oracle Linux strategy and roadmap direct from Wim Coekaerts, VP of Linux Engineering at Oracle? Find out where and when, plus how other companies like Cisco and Intel are using Oracle Linux. Here's the summary of Linux-related content at Oracle OpenWorld:

Focus on Oracle Linux

The summary covers:

  • Keynotes
  • General Session
  • Oracle Linux and Oracle VM Customer Forum

- Rick
Website
Newsletter
Facebook
Twitter

Friday Sep 16, 2011

The Confederate Hellcat and Other Minimal Configurations

I've been looking for a reason to use this picture of the Confederate HellCat for a while, now. A souped-up Harley engine in a radical sportbike chassis. Makes you want to run into the garage and roll around in dirty oil rags, doesn't it?

Here's another minimal configuration:

Recommendations for Creating Reduced or Minimal Oracle Solaris Configurations

Some sites use OS minimization to reduce the security footprint of their Oracle Solaris installations. Others do it to reduce the administrative burden of patching and updating software. But minimization has both risks and benefits. Glenn Brunette provides his recommendations for mitigating the risks and reaping the benefits. Covers initial installation, package removal, patching, and what to watch out for. Applies to Oracle Solaris 10 and prior releases.

And since we're talking about simplification, this article might also be apropos (that's French for "I like American beer"):

How I Simplified the Installation of Oracle Database on Oracle Linux

Ginny Henningsen describes how she simplified the installation of Oracle Database 11g by automatically pre-configuring Oracle Linux with the required software packages and correct kernel parameters. Hint: using the "oracle-validated " RPM package.

- Rick
Website
Newsletter
Facebook
Twitter

About

Contributors:
Rick Ramsey
Kemer Thomson
and members of the OTN community

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
13
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today
Blogs We Like