Wednesday Oct 28, 2015

Systems News from Oracle OpenWorld 2015 | OTN Systems Hub Blog

Head on over to the OTN Systems Hub blog and the OTN Garage social media pages for all the latest Systems news straight from Oracle OpenWorld 2015!

See you there!

- Logan Rosenstein, OTN Systems Community Manager

Thursday Sep 17, 2015

Who is this new guy? Meet Logan Rosenstein, the new OTN Systems Community Manager.

As many of you know, back in May after a long career in the communities of Sun and Oracle, the great Rick Ramsey announced his retirement. This left such a gaping hole in the OTN Systems community that the amazing staff at Oracle and in the Oracle Technology Network searched day and night to find a magical foot growing potion in an effort to fill those giant shoes.

After an exhaustive search, they decided my size 11s will do and hired me, Logan Rosenstein, as the new OTN Systems Community Manager.

For the last several years, I've worked in various communities and dabbled at IT in the video game industry. When I was able to separate my hands from a video game controller (work related research obviously), I worked on degrees in Business and Computer Science. Now that I've earned the piece of paper that says I have a Masters in Computer Science, I figured it was a good time to join the real world and jump from video game publishing over to Oracle. As a big fan of aviation, I've studied and written about real-time operating systems use in avionics and other embedded systems, network security in the FAA's Next Gen system, and I have great interests in artificial intelligence and its use with computer vision in autonomous vehicles; all of which are great topics to bring up during speed dating.

Over the next several months, you may see some minor changes to the structure of the community, some renaming of forums to make navigation a little easier, and some community infrastructure upgrades to improve the overall experience. Please don't be alarmed, it will likely just be my colleagues and I tinkering around to make sure that the community platform is keeping up with the needs of the members. I will do my very best to explain all the changes, roll them out slowly, and ask for input. If you have anything you would like to see happen, feel free to reach out to me and let me know.

I am extremely excited to be a part of the community and to do my part to help members learn, grow, and communicate. Feel free to reach out to me via any of the OTN Systems social media channels as well as through my community profile. Harmless plug inbound! Please follow the OTN Systems Hub blog, this is where all the new blog posts will be hosted. Don't worry, the OTN Garage blog isn't going anywhere and all its past content will remain available.

About the picture: This is a picture I took of my Chocolate Lab "Gunner" Besides being the best dog on the planet (don't even attempt to argue, I've made my decision and it's final), his expression accurately portrays my own at this very moment as I am welcomed into the OTN family; wide-eyed and focused from excitement, legs spread out to handle the weight of all the responsibilities, completely frazzled hair from stress and covered in water in an attempt to push it back down and look composed. At the end of the day, my eyes are on the prize and I'm ready!

Tuesday May 19, 2015

Tech Article: How to Start Using Docker on Oracle Linux

As Ginny Henningsen puts it, "Docker is an open source virtualization technology that creates lightweight Linux application containers." What I think is particularly cool about Docker is the portability it derives from its open-source genes. As Ginny explains:

"Docker containers can define an application and its dependencies using a small text file (a Dockerfile) that can be moved to different Linux releases and quickly rebuilt, simplifying application portability. In this way, "Dockerized" applications are easily migrated to different Linux servers where they can execute on bare metal, in a virtual machine, or on Linux instances in the cloud."

Here's her article, plus a few additional resources to help you include Docker in your Linux deployments:

Tech Article: Getting Started with Docker on Oracle Linux

by Ginny Henningsen

How to customize a Docker container image and use it to instantiate application instances across different Linux servers. This article describes how to create a Dockerfile, how to allocate runtime resources to containers, and how to establish a communication channel between two containers (for example, between web server and database containers).

Docker Resources

About the Photograph

I took the picture of that wagon in Stovepipe Wells, Death Valley, on my ride to the Sun Reunion.

- Rick

P.S. My last day at Oracle will be May 31. If you'd like to stay in touch, use the links on the left, below:

Follow Rick on:
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Wednesday May 13, 2015

A Brief Chat with the Linux Foundation

I recently got to chat with Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of the Linux Foundation. In case you were just rescued from a buried time capsule as part of a fraternity pledge, you probably already know that the Linux Foundation is a non-profit trade association that fosters the growth of Linux. It supports the Linux kernel development community, provides services to help companies adopt Linux, and hosts collaborative projects to solve problems in an increasing range of fields. It is supported by leading Linux and open source companies, including IBM, Intel, and Oracle.

More about the Linux Foundation

Every year the Linux Foundation surveys large-scale enterprises to find out how they are using, and planning to continue using, Linux. Jim was kind enough to take a few minutes to walk me through the results of this year's survey. You can listen to our conversation here:

Podcast: How Large Enterprises are Using Linux - mp3

Here's Jim's blog, his Twitter handle, and a recent Ted talk discovered by Dan Lynch.

About the Photograph

I took that photograph of Lower Yellowstone Falls from Uncle Tom's Trail while on a DOG Run in 2014.

- Rick

P.S. My last day at Oracle will be May 31. If you'd like to stay in touch, use the links below:

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Thursday Apr 30, 2015

Migration and Provisioning Strategies, Plus SWiS for Developers

OTN's next Virtual Technology Summit (VTS) is being held on these dates:

Here's some information about the sessions:


The main benefits of deploying Oracle Linux are its optimizations for the Oracle stack and the newer capabilities such as Docker that you can access long before they are released in the major Red Hat distributions. Did you know, however, that you can also optimize your applications to run better on the Oracle stack using Oracle Solaris Studio? In spite of the name, it is designed to help your Oracle Linux applications take advantage of performance, security, and reliability advances across the entire Oracle stack, particularly Oracle Database. Our first two sessions for VTS4 will show you how to migrate from Red Hat Linux to Oracle Linux and give you an overview of the capabilities of the Oracle Solaris Studio IDE. And just in case you'd like to practice a little, our third session will show you some advanced techniques for deploying applications through Oracle Virtual Box.

Session 1 - How to Migrate from RHEL to Oracle Linux

by Erik Benner

Oracle Linux has been around since 2006, and for years it has offered several advantages over the Red hat distribution which it tracks. These advantages include lower support costs, improved performance in many key areas, like SSD I/O, the ability to use Ksplice for zero downtime patching and support for emerging technologies like Docker and Openstack. Migrating your existing RHEL servers to Oracle Linux is not as challenging as many admins would expect. This VTS session will show admins how to migrate an existing RHEL 6.x system to Oracle Linux. A process that takes minutes to perform! To prepare for this lab, please have an RHEL 6.x installed, with network connectivity to the internet.

Software in Silicon and What's New in Oracle Solaris Studio

by Ikroop Dilhon

Learn about Software in Silicon Application Data Integrity and how developers can use this revolutionary technology to quickly and easily increase application reliability. Also learn about what's new in Oracle Solaris Studio, including redesigned performance analysis tools, powerful memory leak protection tools, and remote development support that enables you to develop applications for Oracle systems from virtually any desktop environment.

Advanced Provisioning Techniques for VirtualBox

by Oracle ACE Seth Miller

This presentation will demonstrate advanced techniques to accelerate the provisioning of virtual machines in VirtualBox using the VirtualBox command-line tools. The first half of the presentation focuses on the VBoxManage command-line tool itself, showing how it can do everything the GUI can with much greater efficiency and speed. The second half will take those same commands and run them in PowerShell while at the same time demonstrating PowerShell's robust scripting capabilities.

- Rick

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Friday Mar 06, 2015

5 Steps for Installing Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Solaris 11

You can install and run Oracle Database 12c on different platforms, but if you install it on an Oracle Solaris 11 zone, you can take advantage of these capabilities:

  • Isolation - Database processes that execute in one zone have no access to database processes running in another zone. This isolation simplifies database consolidation, allowing multiple instances and versions to coexist safely on a single physical machine.
  • Independently Managed and Autonomous Environments - A non-global zone can be booted, patched, and shut down independently. A failure or reboot of one zone has no impact on other zones (unless, of course, a failure is due to a shared component). A zone reboot is faster than a full server reboot (seconds versus minutes), so a database in a rebooted zone is available more quickly.
  • Distinctive Identity - You can define virtual network interfaces for a zone, so you can give the database instance installed on that zone its own independent host name and IP address. You can also apply networking resource controls to zones, aligning network bandwidth consumption with service level targets.
  • Easy Database Instance Migration - If a database needs more CPU power, you can add CPUs to an Oracle Solaris Zone and reboot the zone. If a database needs more compute capacity than what's available in the physical server, you can migrate the zone to a larger server.
  • Hard Partitioning - Assigning a resource pool or capping CPU cores can configure Oracle Solaris Zones as hard partitions for Oracle Database licensing purposes. This can potentially lower database licensing costs.

Tech Article: 5 Steps to Installing Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Solaris 11

by Ginny Henningsen and Glynn Foster

Ginny Henningsen and Glynn Foster from the Oracle Solaris product management team wrote down the simplest instructions for installing Oracle Database 12c in an Oracle Solaris 11 non-global zone, including how to implement hard partitioning.

About the Photograph

That's a closeup of one section of the Cedar Breaks National Monument, in Utah. I snapped the picture from a lookout located at an altitude of over 10,000 feet.

- Rick

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Thursday Feb 19, 2015

How to Install and Use Oracle Solaris 11.2 for x86 from an ISO in VirtualBox

I ran into Erik Benner, founder of the SPARC/Solaris SIG group for IOUG, at Rocky Mountain Oracle User Group Training Days yesterday. He has been busy. Not only is he working on some labs and demos for OTN's upcoming Virtual Technology Summits, but he's taken the time to write a three-part blog to show you how easy it is to install and play with Oracle Solaris 11.2 for x86 on VirtualBox. In his own words ... "Recently I had a DBA at an IOUG event complain that they were unable to install from the Solaris 11.2 ISO. They had seen me demo Openstack a few weeks ago, and wanted to know how to install Solaris 11.2 in a VM. So guys… here is a step by step for you."

Part 1 - How to Install Oracle Solaris 11.2 for x86 from an ISO in VirtualBox

by Erik Benner

Covers how to launch the Solaris VM, how to assign it memory, how to create a virtual drive and configure it as a dynamic allocated drive to save space, how to install the Oracle Solaris 11.2 image, and how to start it.

Part 2 - How to Patch Oracle Solaris 11.2 the Easy Way

by Erik Benner

You've probably heard by now that the new patching system in Oracle Solaris 11 lets you patch or revert back with a simple reboot. Erik walks us through a few simple uses of the beadm and pkg update commands.

Part 3 - Managing NICs, IPs, and Hostnames

by Erik Benner

How to configure the networking capabilities of your VirtualBox environment to run Oracle Database 12c so that you can experiment with its new V$KERNEL_IO_OUTLIER views and the Optimized Shared Memory method of managing database memory. Covers adding disks and configuring them into a ZFS pool, adding a NIC to the database server, and setting up IP addresses correctly. This is done differently in Oracle Solaris 11 than in previous releases, as Erik explains.

About Erik Benner

Erik Benner is an enterprise architect for Mythics Corporation, which provides training, systems integration, consulting, and managed services for the entire Oracle product line of cloud, software, support, hardware, engineered systems, and appliances.

About the Photograph

That's a 2015 Ducati Monster 821 in the foreground, and my 01 Ducati 748S Superbike in the background. I took that picture in my driveway in late Fall of 2014.

- Rick

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Friday Feb 13, 2015

How to Build a Software Defined Network with Oracle Solaris 11

Before software engineers got so freakin' smart, we used to pay a special type of sysadmin to fiddle with the cables and switches at the back of our racks. They were mean, they were hunch-backed, and their fingers were stained with nicotine.

Those were the good old days. Today, network administrators wash their clothes and and sit at desks. And they use something called "software defined networking." I looked it up in the Urban Dictionary, but there was no listing for it. Which is just as well because if you ask me ...

Software Defined Networking = voodoo magic

A Little Bit About Software Defined Networking

Software Defined Networking is the equivalent of doing your homework the week before it's due. I mean, who does that? Well, the Solaris engineers at Oracle do, for starters. Talk about annoying! They started this trend back in the early days of Oracle Solaris 11. Instead of visiting Rufus in the basement server room, they designed this infrastructure that makes it possible for them to put dibs on networking resources from the comfort of the local Starbucks.

In other words, instead of Rufus yanking cables out of one box and hooking them up to another, you can simply change the cable routing by keyboard, so to speak. And assign them to virtual compute nodes. And configure all kinds of aspects about each network, including Service Level Agreements, an implement of Trotskyist-Leninist Totalitarianism if there ever was one. All without waking Rufus.

Orgad Kimchi, our fearless explorer of real-world Solaris, horsed around with not only the software defined networking capabilities of Oracle Solaris 11, but its latest features, which, in his words provide "greater application agility without the added overhead of expensive network hardware." The SDN features in Oracle Solaris 11.2 now:

  • Enable application-driven, multitenant cloud virtual networking across a completely distributed set of systems
  • Allow network service-level agreements (SLAs) at the application level
  • Provide cloud-readiness, thanks to the OpenStack distribution include in Oracle Solaris 11
  • Integrate tightly with Oracle Solaris Zones.

Tech Article: How to Build a Software Defined Network Using Elastic Virtual Switches

In Oracle Solaris 11.2

Orgad starts by walking you through the steps to set up SSH authentication and the Elastic Virtual Switch controller. Then he shows you how to configure both compute nodes, the four Solaris zones, and their virtual networks. He wraps up by showing you how to test the entire configuration to make sure it's working the way you want. Orgad writes from real-world experience, so you can trust his recommendations.

About the Photographs

I snapped the picture of the lamp at Stovepipe Wells, and the picture of Linda Lu, my 2008 Harley Davidson Softail Custom, while riding through Death Valley, California in the Spring of 2014. To get a better feel for the strange vastness of Death Valley, click on the image below to go to Wordpress, then click on the Wordpress image to enlarge it.

- Rick

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Thursday Feb 05, 2015

VBox Image and Instructions for Hands-On Labs Now Available

The instructions for the hands-on labs that will be proctored in OTN's upcoming Virtual Technology Summit are now available on OTN's Community Platform. To register:

As described in a previous blog, the Systems track will feature two 90-minute hands-on labs. The instructions for the labs, including links to the download, are available here:

Although you can work the labs on your own, the Virtual Tech Day will have the engineers from the Oracle Solaris Studio Team available to answer questions.

About the Photograph

I took a photograph of the beach at San Simeon California, during my ride home from the Sun Reunion.

- Rick

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Wednesday Jan 21, 2015

Hands On Labs for C, C++, Fortran (and Java) Developers

I've always been a fan of Oracle Solaris Studio because it's the tool of choice for bad.ass developers. Java developers are ubiquitous, Database developers get more attention here at Oracle, and marketing apps generate a lot of buzz nowadays. But Fortran, C, and C++ developers bend big iron to their will. So I'm pumped that OTN's upcoming Virtual Tech Summit (VTS) will feature two 90-minute hands-on labs proctored by members of the Oracle Solaris Studio engineering team.

Lab: How to Use the Code Analyzer in Oracle Solaris Studio

moderated by Joseph Raja
Note:Instructions will be posted here before the end of January.

The Code Analyzer is a suite of tools designed to work with the Studio C/C++ compiler to identify issues in source code. The tools in this suite are

  • Previse, for compile-time checking of errors e.g. exceeding array bounds, infinite loops, etc.
  • Discover, to identify memory leak and memory corruption issues at run time, etc.
  • Uncover, to verify test coverage and identify sections of code not being tested
  • Codean, allows comparative analysis of error report across large projects
  • Code-analyzer, an intuitive GUI that allows analyzing and fixing the errors.

This lab will show you how to identify and rectify errors with these tools.

Lab: How to Use the Performance Analyzer in Oracle Solaris Studio

moderated by Eugene Loh
Note:Instructions will be posted here before the end of January.

The Performance Analyzer is a GUI and CLI tool for examining the performance of Java, C, C++, and Fortran applications and relating it back to constructs in the source code (functions, call stacks, source code lines, data structures, etc.) so that application performance can be understood and improved. The tool can examine time spent, Solaris microstates, hardware counters (cache and TLB misses, branch mispredicts,and so on), I/O operations, heap memory usage, synchronization locks, etc. Data collection is typically statistical, giving representative results with minimal invasiveness, even on highly optimized code. It is possible to profile the Solaris kernel. A timeline display shows load imbalances, synchronization, and different phases of execution.

This lab will help you become familiar with the basic operations of the Performance Analyzer.


About the Photograph

That's a picture of my daughter and two of her friends preparing for their next hand-to-hand combat session during Basic Training, affectionately referred to as "Beast" at the US Air Force Academy. If they were developers, they'd be Systems developers.

- Rick

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Thursday Jan 15, 2015

What Hardware and Software Do YOU Want Oracle to Build?

If you'd like a particular dial, knob, or bling on one of our upcoming products, here's your chance to let our engineers, our product managers, and even our pesky executives know.

Join Our Customer Advisory Panel

After you sign up, you'll be invited to participate in very short surveys no more than once a month. Participate in the surveys you like, ignore those you don't. You might even get invited to join Oracle's Customer Connect community, where you can talk to other customers and view results from recent customer panels.

Sign up here.

About the Photograph

I took the picture of JimBob, The Don, and El Jefe Con Queso guarding the general store on a ride from cold and snowy Colorado to warm and sunny Luckenbach several years ago, where we were made Deputy Sheriffs for the day.

- Rick

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Thursday Jan 08, 2015

The Importance of Hardware

Not long ago I had a brief conversation with an "expert" in the Oracle Stack. The expert had provided a comprehensive overview of Oracle technologies, from the top of the stack all the way to the database. I asked where the second part of the overview was, the part that covered virtualization, the OS, hardware, networking, storage, engineered systems, and optimized solutions. The expert shrugged and said those were "commodities."

I can tell you from experience that deep breathing and long walks do wonders for apoplexy. It's not that I don't appreciate the software. Of course I appreciate the software. Without it, what's the point of the hardware! It's just that I don't understand how people who love the software can fail to respect the hardware.

Oracle has been broadcasting for quite a while, now, the benefits you can gain from its advances in hardware, but the reaction I usually get from the unwashed masses is "yeah, well, you've invested in it, so of course you're going to hock it."

Thank goodness there is still some common sense left in the world.

In this TechTarget editorial, Rich Castagna explains, in very simple terms, that advances in software are helplessly dependent on advances in hardware. If you rub elbows with a software zealot, show them the article.

While you're at it, make sure to take a look at Oracle's latest advances in Software in Silicon, including the Software in Silicon Cloud, which allows you to test and optimize your applications on Oracle's latest hardware before you buy it. Here are three links to get you started:

Bookmark this

Software on Silicon Landing Page
so you can keep up with the latest developments

About the Photograph

I took the picture of Black Betty, a 2007 Harley Davidson Softail Custom (FXSTC), in my driveway in Lunenburg, Massachusetts, in the Spring of 2008.

- Rick

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Wednesday Dec 31, 2014

Most Active Systems ACES of 2014

One of the best parts about my job is working with Oracle ACES. They are loads of fun, interesting, and know so much more about Oracle technologies than I ever will. One of the worst parts is not having the time to give them the recognition they deserve. I won't be able to remedy that anytime soon, but I'd like to use this time at the end of the year to at least shout out to the most active Systems ACES of 2014. If you were active in 2014, please let me know so I can update this blog with your activities, as well.

Newest ACE: Brian Bream

Brian Bream is the USA's first official Systems ACE. He had tremendous depth in Solaris, SPARC servers, engineered systems, and Oracle tools, and he's keenly aware of the challenges that sysadmins face today. I've interviewed him several times for OTN Garage and Oracle OpenWorld Live. I recently wrote a blog about Brian's ACE nomination, so you can read more about him there.

Ed "Hulk" Whalen

If you search the ACE repository for Edward Whalen, he is officially listed as an expert in database management and performance. Which he is, of course. But he's also got a keen interest in Oracle Linux and Oracle VM. Here are two of the books he's written on those topics:

See Ed's Amazon page here.

Ed has also been willing to conduct and participate in interviews, plus write technical articles for OTN:

I make sure to interview him when I can, and post links to his content when I can. Ed's got deep expertise, and his community contributions and reputation are growing to the point that I expect him to be accepted as an ACE director soon.

The Prolific Alexandre Borges

Alexandre knows and teaches Oracle Solaris in depth. His real-world perspective with Solaris is priceless. In his latest book, Oracle Solaris 11 Advanced Administration Cookbook he provides in-depth coverage of every important feature in the Oracle Solaris 11 operating system. Starting with how to manage the IPS repository, make a local repository, and create your own IPS package, he explains how to handle boot environments, configure and manage ZFS frameworks, implement zones, create SMF services, and review SMF operations. Also how to configure an Automated Installer, role-based access control (RBAC) and least privileges, how to configure and administer resource manager, and finally an introduction to performance tuning.

Alexandre is also a prolific author of OTN articles. For instance, he recently finished writing an entire series on ZFS. We have published seven of them so far, with more on the way:

Seth Miller - Closet Systems ACE

Seth Miller is another one of those closet Systems ACES. Though he shows up in the ACE repository as a database ACE, he knows an awful lot about engineered systems and sysadmins:

Seth recently co-authored a book about Oracle Enterprise Manager with Kellyn Pot'Vin and Ray Smith, and had the good taste to focus on the command line:

Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Command Line Interface

By the way, that's not Seth Miller, this is Seth Miller.

El Gaucho Diego Aguirre

When Diego is not selecting the best imported beers for his cooler, he's busy trying to keep older SPARC hardware and earlier versions of Oracle Solaris running in the data centers of his native Buenos Aires. It was also his idea to write this year-end wrap-up for Systems ACES. Gracias, Diego! Here are a few of his latest blogs. They're in Spanish, but Google will kinda sorta do a lame translation.

On My Radar

Becoming an Oracle ACE requires skill, expertise, and generosity. These four technologists have it, and I will be working with them over the coming year to help them achieve it.

About the Photograph

I took the photograph of rowdy Oracle ACES at the back of the bus on our way to the ACE Dinner after Oracle OpenWorld 2014.

- Rick

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Monday Dec 29, 2014

Top 10 Systems Articles of 2014

Glynn Foster was on fire in 2014. Not only did he create several hands-on labs for OTN's Virtual Tech Summit, but he wrote three of OTN's top 10 articles for the year. Thank you Glynn, and Thank You to all the other writers who did the hard work of filling OTN with excellent Systems content. Don Bastardo finds you worthy of note.

0. How I Simplified Oracle Database 12c and 11g Installations on Oracle Linux 6

by Ginny Henningsen, updated by Michele Casey

Updated for Oracle database 12c and Oracle Linux 6. Ginny simplifies the installation of Oracle Database 11g by automatically pre-configuring Oracle Linux with the required software packages and correct kernel parameters.

1. How to Configure the Linux Out-of-Memory Killer

by Robert Chase

What the Linux out-of-memory (OOM) killer is and how to find out why it killed a particular process. Methods for configuring the OOM killer to better suit the needs of many different environments.

2. How to Create a Local Unbreakable Linux Network Mirror

by Jared Greenwald and Avi Miller

How to create a local yum repository for Oracle Linux, and configure up2date and yum to install and update packages from the repositories.

3. Taking Your First Steps with Oracle Solaris 11

by Glynn Foster

How to install Solaris 11 using the Automated Graphical Installer, one of three installation tools provided in Solaris 11. Glynn Foster and Brian Leonard show you how to install it either on VirtualBox, on bare metal as a standalone OS, or alongside another OS in a multi-boot environment on bare metal

4. How to Get Started Configuring Your Network in Oracle Solaris 11

by Andrew Walton

dladm and ipadm in Oracle Solaris 11 supersede ifconfig. Unlike ifconfig, changes made by dladm and ipadm are persistent across reboots. Andrew Walton explains these and other changes to networking in Solaris 11, and shows you how to work with them.

5. Introducing the Basics of Service Management Facility (SMF) on Oracle Solaris 11

by Glynn Foster

The Service Management Facility in Oracle Solaris 11 makes sure that essential system and application services run continuously even in the event of hardware or software failures. This article provides a few simple examples of administering services on Oracle Solaris 11.

6. Mixing C and C++ Code in the Same Program

by Stephen Clamage

This article shows how to solve common problems that arise when you mix C and C++ code, and highlights the areas where you might run into portability issues.

7. How to Update Oracle Solaris 11 Systems From Oracle Support Repositories

by Glynn Foster

You may already know that you don't have to worry about manually tracking and validating patch dependencies when you update a version of Oracle Solaris 11. This makes updates much easier. Glynn Foster demonstrates how easy it is to update the OS from a support repository, and how to make sure everything went well.

8. How to Get Started Creating Oracle Solaris Zones in Oracle Solaris 11

by Duncan Hardie

Zones are more tightly integrated with other OS features in Oracle Solaris 11 than they were in Oracle Solaris 10. As a result, you can do more with zones than you could before. Plus, it's easier. But you still need to learn the new commands and procedures. This article by Duncan Hardie is a great start: it shows you how to create a zone using the command line, how to add an application to a zone, and how to clone a zone. All in Solaris 11.

9. How to Use Oracle VM VirtualBox Templates

by Yuli Vasiliev

This article explains how to use Oracle VM VirtualBox Templates in Oracle VM VirtualBox. It is similar to the article that explains how to prepare an Oracle VM environment to use Oracle VM Templates, but it describes how to download, install, and configure the templates within Oracle VM VirtualBox, instead of on bare metal.

About the Photograph

Don Bastardo (Jellicle name Pippon Kitton) manages to survive the coyotes and mountain lions that prey on less wary house pets in my part of Colorado, and he has made lasting friendships with the local foxes. I took this picture of him while he was perched on our deck.

- Rick

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Friday Dec 19, 2014

Three New Dev Tips for C++ Developers

How to Find Out What Resources Your Application Has Used

by Darry Gove

If you want to know how much CPU, memory, or other resources your application has used, you can pre-load a library and define a .fini method that prints out the results. You can also take advantage of the getusage call, which provides some information about CPU time and processes. But more information is available. Darryl provides examples of how to use these two components plus others that fill in the details.

How To Rapidly Identify Performance Opportunities

by Darry Gove

Profiling is critical to improving application performance. Without profiling, it is very easy to guess where the application is spending cycles, and then expend effort optimizing code that has little effect on overall performance. Oracle Solaris Studio 12.4 provides an overview screen designed to focus you on the metrics with the most promise. Darryl Gove walks you through the overview screen and explains what it indicates about your application.

Dev Tip: How to Get Finer Grained Control of Debugging Information

by Ivan Soleimanipour

The new options in Oracle Solaris Studio 12.4 provide much finer-grained control over debug information, which allows you to choose how much information is provided and reduce the amount of disk space needed for the executable. Ivan enumerates the options and provides examples of how to use them.

About the Photograph

I took the picture of the 01 Ducati 748S this summer, in Colorado. It currently has about 1300 miles on the odometer.

- Rick

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Logan Rosenstein
and members of the OTN community


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