Monday Jul 13, 2015

Call for Papers: OTN VTS Systems Track - September 2015

If you've spent the last several months in a cave it's possible that you have not heard of the OTN Virtual Technology Summit event series. No problem -- I'll bring you up to speed.

Each event in this quarterly series is comprised of four tracks, covering Java, Database, Middleware, and of course, Systems. Within each track you'll find a selection of sessions presented by community members and members of various product teams. The sessions are deeply technical, with a focus on hands-on, how-to information.

If you're interested in presenting in the Systems track at one of these events, you can submit your session proposals in this special dedicated space on the OTN Community Platform. Please note that you must be logged in to the Community Platform in order to submit a session proposal. A Community account is absolutely free, and also entitles you to access to a wide array of discussion groups and other resources.

Systems track proposals are now being accepted for sessions covering Oracle operating systems, virtualization, or hardware for the September 2015 event. In order to be considered for the September event, proposals must be submitted by Monday July 20. Final selection will be made by July 27.

Questions? Post them as a comment, below?

Thursday Apr 30, 2015

Migration and Provisioning Strategies, Plus SWiS for Developers

OTN's next Virtual Technology Summit (VTS) is being held on these dates:

Here's some information about the sessions:


The main benefits of deploying Oracle Linux are its optimizations for the Oracle stack and the newer capabilities such as Docker that you can access long before they are released in the major Red Hat distributions. Did you know, however, that you can also optimize your applications to run better on the Oracle stack using Oracle Solaris Studio? In spite of the name, it is designed to help your Oracle Linux applications take advantage of performance, security, and reliability advances across the entire Oracle stack, particularly Oracle Database. Our first two sessions for VTS4 will show you how to migrate from Red Hat Linux to Oracle Linux and give you an overview of the capabilities of the Oracle Solaris Studio IDE. And just in case you'd like to practice a little, our third session will show you some advanced techniques for deploying applications through Oracle Virtual Box.

Session 1 - How to Migrate from RHEL to Oracle Linux

by Erik Benner

Oracle Linux has been around since 2006, and for years it has offered several advantages over the Red hat distribution which it tracks. These advantages include lower support costs, improved performance in many key areas, like SSD I/O, the ability to use Ksplice for zero downtime patching and support for emerging technologies like Docker and Openstack. Migrating your existing RHEL servers to Oracle Linux is not as challenging as many admins would expect. This VTS session will show admins how to migrate an existing RHEL 6.x system to Oracle Linux. A process that takes minutes to perform! To prepare for this lab, please have an RHEL 6.x installed, with network connectivity to the internet.

Software in Silicon and What's New in Oracle Solaris Studio

by Ikroop Dilhon

Learn about Software in Silicon Application Data Integrity and how developers can use this revolutionary technology to quickly and easily increase application reliability. Also learn about what's new in Oracle Solaris Studio, including redesigned performance analysis tools, powerful memory leak protection tools, and remote development support that enables you to develop applications for Oracle systems from virtually any desktop environment.

Advanced Provisioning Techniques for VirtualBox

by Oracle ACE Seth Miller

This presentation will demonstrate advanced techniques to accelerate the provisioning of virtual machines in VirtualBox using the VirtualBox command-line tools. The first half of the presentation focuses on the VBoxManage command-line tool itself, showing how it can do everything the GUI can with much greater efficiency and speed. The second half will take those same commands and run them in PowerShell while at the same time demonstrating PowerShell's robust scripting capabilities.

- Rick

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Wednesday Dec 31, 2014

Most Active Systems ACES of 2014

One of the best parts about my job is working with Oracle ACES. They are loads of fun, interesting, and know so much more about Oracle technologies than I ever will. One of the worst parts is not having the time to give them the recognition they deserve. I won't be able to remedy that anytime soon, but I'd like to use this time at the end of the year to at least shout out to the most active Systems ACES of 2014. If you were active in 2014, please let me know so I can update this blog with your activities, as well.

Newest ACE: Brian Bream

Brian Bream is the USA's first official Systems ACE. He had tremendous depth in Solaris, SPARC servers, engineered systems, and Oracle tools, and he's keenly aware of the challenges that sysadmins face today. I've interviewed him several times for OTN Garage and Oracle OpenWorld Live. I recently wrote a blog about Brian's ACE nomination, so you can read more about him there.

Ed "Hulk" Whalen

If you search the ACE repository for Edward Whalen, he is officially listed as an expert in database management and performance. Which he is, of course. But he's also got a keen interest in Oracle Linux and Oracle VM. Here are two of the books he's written on those topics:

See Ed's Amazon page here.

Ed has also been willing to conduct and participate in interviews, plus write technical articles for OTN:

I make sure to interview him when I can, and post links to his content when I can. Ed's got deep expertise, and his community contributions and reputation are growing to the point that I expect him to be accepted as an ACE director soon.

The Prolific Alexandre Borges

Alexandre knows and teaches Oracle Solaris in depth. His real-world perspective with Solaris is priceless. In his latest book, Oracle Solaris 11 Advanced Administration Cookbook he provides in-depth coverage of every important feature in the Oracle Solaris 11 operating system. Starting with how to manage the IPS repository, make a local repository, and create your own IPS package, he explains how to handle boot environments, configure and manage ZFS frameworks, implement zones, create SMF services, and review SMF operations. Also how to configure an Automated Installer, role-based access control (RBAC) and least privileges, how to configure and administer resource manager, and finally an introduction to performance tuning.

Alexandre is also a prolific author of OTN articles. For instance, he recently finished writing an entire series on ZFS. We have published seven of them so far, with more on the way:

Seth Miller - Closet Systems ACE

Seth Miller is another one of those closet Systems ACES. Though he shows up in the ACE repository as a database ACE, he knows an awful lot about engineered systems and sysadmins:

Seth recently co-authored a book about Oracle Enterprise Manager with Kellyn Pot'Vin and Ray Smith, and had the good taste to focus on the command line:

Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Command Line Interface

By the way, that's not Seth Miller, this is Seth Miller.

El Gaucho Diego Aguirre

When Diego is not selecting the best imported beers for his cooler, he's busy trying to keep older SPARC hardware and earlier versions of Oracle Solaris running in the data centers of his native Buenos Aires. It was also his idea to write this year-end wrap-up for Systems ACES. Gracias, Diego! Here are a few of his latest blogs. They're in Spanish, but Google will kinda sorta do a lame translation.

On My Radar

Becoming an Oracle ACE requires skill, expertise, and generosity. These four technologists have it, and I will be working with them over the coming year to help them achieve it.

About the Photograph

I took the photograph of rowdy Oracle ACES at the back of the bus on our way to the ACE Dinner after Oracle OpenWorld 2014.

- Rick

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Wednesday Aug 27, 2014

Brendan Gregg's Quick Reference Page for Linux Performance

You may know about Brendan Gregg because of his contributions to DTrace and other Oracle Solaris technologies. Here are two resources to refresh your memory.

Recently, Brendan turned his high-performance spectacles on Linux:

Linux Performance Quick Reference

In his own words, "This page links to various Linux performance material I've created, including the tools maps on the right, which show: Linux observability tools, Linux benchmarking tools, Linux tuning tools, and Linux observability sar. For more diagrams, see my slide decks below."

His diagram reminds me of Edward Tufte's work on elegant visual explanations. Give it a read, bookmark it, and show your friends. While you're at it, be sure to take a look at OTN's resources for Oracle Linux.

About the Photograph

I took a picture of that cove from somewhere in Highway 1 on the California Coast on my ride back from the Sun Reunion.

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Wednesday Mar 26, 2014

More Tips for Remote Access with Oracle Linux

In a previous blog, Oracle Linux Tips and Tricks, I covered alternative ways to use SSH. In this article, I will cover some additional tips and tricks for using SSH for remote access, as well as some other ways to connect remotely to a server.

SSH's primary use is for remote access to hosts. SSH is not only able to provide us a terminal interface to a server, it's also able to provide us a transport for a graphical interface. In order to utilize this functionality, we must have an X server running on our local workstation. On a Linux workstation with a graphical environment, this functionality is built in. On other systems, such as a Windows machine or a Mac, this functionality is not built in. Both XQuartz on the Mac and MobaXTerm are X servers for these platforms. There are also a number of other open source and paid products available for both platforms.

Once you have an acceptable X server installed on your local workstation, you can connect with SSH using the following ssh command. The -X enables X11 forwarding for the connection. Keep in mind that the X11 forwarding is based on the user who originally connected. Logging in with one user and then using sudo often will not work, depending on the permissions and ownership needed to complete a task.

[user@laptop ~]$ ssh -X

Once you authenticate, you drop directly to a standard prompt. If you look closely, though, and examine the environment variables in your terminal, you will find an additional environment variable that has the IP address of your workstation. You can examine your environment variables using the env command.


Now you can launch an application that has a graphical interface, and the interface will be displayed on your local workstation. The following example will launch gedit. The ampersand symbol is useful for forking the process in the background so we can retain the use of our terminal.

[user@remotehost ~]$ gedit &

Using X11 connections over SSH can be quite useful for using application installers that are graphical, such as the Oracle Universal Installer for Oracle Database.

The screen application is a great compliment to SSH and is quite useful for sharing an SSH session with another user. Because of the way screen preserves sessions for the user, it is also great for high-latency network connections that have frequent disconnects and for maintaining sessions that time out due to security policies. With a regular SSH connection, if you are disconnected, any processes that were running are not preserved. Unlike SSH, the screen application keeps the session alive so it can be connected to again later.

One of the simplest things you can do with screen is share a session. You can launch screen on the terminal you wish to share by issuing the screen command. Once you do this, a new shell is running inside of screen. Another user can log in to the same machine and use the command screen -x to be immediately connected to your shell. They see everything you type. Even if you disconnect from the machine on either terminal, the shell will continue to run. This can be quite useful for sharing a terminal for a demonstration in a remote office or for running a terminal-based console that is shared between many users.

To see all of the active screen sessions, you can use screen -list, which will show active and detached sessions. To connect to a detached session, you can use screen -r and the pid.session name listed in the screen -list output. In the following example, there are five screen sessions running. One of them is detached.

[user@server ~]$ screen -list
There are screens on:
        24565.pts-1.server     (Attached)
        24581.pts-2.server     (Attached)
        24597.pts-3.server     (Attached)
        24549.pts-0.server     (Attached)
        24613.pts-4.server     (Detached)
5 Sockets in /var/run/screen/S-user.

The command screen -x can be used to connect to a currently attached session. In the following example, a connection to session 24565 is made:

[user@server ~]$ screen -x 24565

If you need access to a full graphical desktop environment remotely, there are a number of packages that can accomplish this. The package tigervnc-server is useful for connections to a remote machine providing a full Linux desktop experience. To set up and install the package, perform the following steps.

First, run the following command to install the package:

[root@server ~]# yum install tigervnc-server

Once the package is installed, you need to edit the file /etc/sysconfig/vncservers. The VNCSERVERS line establishes the user accounts that you want to enable the VNC server for and their display number. In the example below, the user bob is configured for display 2 and the user sue is configured for display 3. The VNCSERVERARGS[#] section allows you to specify options for each display. In this example, we are specifying a 1280 x 1024 resolution for display 2 and a 1024 x 768 resolution for display 3:

VNCSERVERS="2:bob 3:sue"
VNCSERVERARGS[2]="-geometry 1280x1024 "
VNCSERVERARGS[3]="-geometry 1024x768"

Once the /etc/sysconfig/vncservers file has been edited, you need to set passwords for each user account. This is accomplished with the vncpasswd command. In the following example, the user bob sets a password using the vncpasswd command.

[bob@server ~]$ vncpasswd

Once the package is installed, the configuration file is edited, and passwords are set, you are ready to turn on the vncserver service. The following two commands start the service and set the service to start automatically at the next boot:

chkconfig vncserver on
service vncserver start

Once configured and running, you can connect to your Linux system using a standard VNC client. When connecting, be sure to specify the display and password credentials that are needed in order to connect.


I hope these tips and tricks have been useful and that you will take advantage of some of them in the course of your day. We will be publishing more of these tips-and-tricks articles in the future. Feel free to leave a comment for further topics that you would like to see in this series.

See Also

Oracle Linux blog

About the Author

Robert Chase is a member of the Oracle Linux product management team. He has been involved with Linux and open source software since 1996. He has worked with systems as small as embedded devices and with large supercomputer-class hardware.

About the Photograph

Photograph taken by Rick Ramsey in Durango in the Fall of 2012

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If You Have to Ask, You Wouldn't Understand

Although being subjected to that kind of attitude is unpleasant, subjecting someone else to it is loads of fun. Just ask someone who rides a Harley why they ride a Harley, and watch how much they enjoy unloading that sentiment on your head, you member of the unwashed, you.

I feel the same way about Oracle Solaris. Don't talk to me about how much Windows or some other OS is capable of doing. I don't care. Your OS is a metric cruiser. Go away.

That feeling of vast superiority is even more pronounced when I'm talking about Oracle Solaris Studio. Which should have been renamed Oracle Solaris and Oracle Linux Studio, if you are insightful enough to ask me, because any Linux developer who is working on anything remotely interesting should be using Oracle Solaris Studio as their IDE. I freakin love it. I've had the pleasure of interviewing Don Kretch, the head of the Solaris Studio engineering team, many times. And I've enjoyed myself every single time. If you think you're worthy, you are welcome to try to understand our conversation (jump to "Interviews with Don Kretch," below).

If my rhetoric has convinced you, as it would convince anyone of vastly superior intelligence, you'll want to pretend that you already knew how good Oracle Solaris (and Linux) Studio is, and berate me for even suggesting you didn't. Good for you. You're catching on. But you'll still be faced with a dearth of actual knowledge about this IDE for the Vastly Intelligent.

Not to worry. There's a way for you to learn what you need to learn without anyone else finding out so you can pretend to have known all along.

Oracle Solaris (and Linux) Studio 12.4 Beta Program

The Beta Program for Oracle Solaris Studio 12.4 begins today. Download the software, try out its new features, and join in the discussions. These resources will help:

Landing Page, including links to Beta Program Forums
Download Center, where you can download a free copy

Interviews with Don Kretch

About the Photograph

Photograph of 2002 Harley Davidson Softail Deuce taken by Rick Ramsey in Massachusetts, USA.

- Rick

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Friday Jan 31, 2014

Simplifying the Installation of Oracle Database on Oracle Linux - Reprint

Most of my workdays start by shapechanging me into a seven-headed Hydra, and each Hydra promptly makes a beeline for multi-tasking hell. So, when I get a chance to simplify something, anything, I jump on it.

Ginny has done that for OTN at last twice. Below are two of her exercises in simplifying our lives. We published these articles before, but we recently had to rebuild one of them because somebody (I'm not going to say who) deleted it. To avoid annoying one of your Hydras, and instead send you off to a peaceful weekend, here they are again.

How I Simplified Oracle Database Installation on Oracle Linux 5

by Ginny Henningsen

Before installing Oracle Database 10g or 11g on a system, you need to preconfigure the operating environment since the database requires certain software packages, package versions, and tweaks to kernel parameters. Ginny discovered that Oracle Linux provides a remarkably easy way to address these installation prerequisites. Find out how.

How I Simplified Oracle Database 11g and 12c Installation on Oracle Linux 6

by Ginny Henningsen

Similar to the article above, but updated for Database 12c and Oracle Linux 6. Ginny simplifies the installation of Oracle Database 11g by automatically pre-configuring Oracle Linux with the required software packages and correct kernel parameters.

Photograph of Fat Boy on Sakajawea Road in Idaho taken by Rick Ramsey

- Rick

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Thursday Jan 23, 2014

Hands-On Lab Setup Instructions Now Available for Next Virtual Sysadmin Day

As you may already know, OTN's next Virtual Sysadmin Day is on January 28 from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm PT. This sysadmin day is going to be very cool because its hands-on labs focus on solving real-world problems with Oracle technologies.

You'll definitely want to do the prep work before the day of the event. The prep work consists of configuring your laptop and uploading the images. Don't be that guy. The one who, the day of, asks where the instructions are. Him. Don't be him.

Pre-Event Checklist

The checklist provides:

  • Virtual Conference hardware requirements
  • Virtual Conference software requirements
  • Setup instructions for Oracle Solaris labs
  • Setup instructions for Oracle Linux labs
  • Setup instructions for Oracle VM labs

If You Must Tweet

If you can't keep your hands off your danged phone while working on the labs, at least use this hashtag:


Questions for Ed

Oracle ACE extraordinaire Ed Whalen and I will be hanging out at the Sysadmin Lounge during the last 30-45 minutes of the event. Ed knows his stuff, so if you have any questions about Linux, such as how to optimize it for the database or other applications, ask Ed. If you have questions about Harleys or Ducatis, ask me.

See you next week.

photograph of Harleys in Wisconsin by Rick Ramsey

- Rick

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Tuesday Jan 07, 2014

Tips for Using Linux Huge Pages

Ed Whalen is the Chief Technologist at Performance Tuning Corp. He knows an awful lot about making databases run faster, including the use of Linux Huge Pages. Here are two of his very helpful resources.

Tech Article: How to Configure x86 Memory Performance for Large Databases

by Ed Whalen, Oracle ACE

Performance issues in large databases are not easy to detect using normal analysis methods such as AWR reports and OS tools such as sar, top, and iostat. And yet, if you configure your memory appropriately in x86 environments, your database can run significantly faster. This article describes you can use Linux Huge Pages to do just that.

Ed covers x86 virtual memory architecture, Linux memory management, and enabling Linux Huge Pages. See the article here.

Video Interview: What Are Linux Huge Pages?

with Ed Whalen, Oracle ACE

Ed Whalen, Oracle ACE, explains Linux huge pages, the huge performance increase they provide, and how sysadmins and DBA's need to work together to use them properly. Taped at Oracle Open World 2013.

photograph of cliff face in Perry Park, Colorado, copyright Rick Ramsey

- Rick

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Thursday Jan 02, 2014

About our Latest Lab: How to Migrate to Oracle Linux and Oracle VM

Step by Step Instructions for Migrating to Oracle Linux and Oracle VM

Red Hat Linux and VMWare are fine technologies. A great pairing. However, if you have business reasons for migrating to Oracle Linux and Oracle VM, such as having earlier access to the latest Linux innovations or taking advantage of more integrated virtualization, take a look at our latest lab. It provides the best step by step instructions we could come up with for carrying out that migration. You can also try it just to hone your migration skills. You never know when the boss is going to ask you whether you can handle a migration.

Here's a peek at the major tasks:

  1. Start the two servers (Oracle VM Server and Oracle VM Manager).
  2. Connect to Oracle VM Manager and become familiar with the product.
  3. Verify that the Oracle VM environment started correctly.
  4. Import an assembly that has Oracle Database on top and was exported from VMware.
  5. Create an Oracle VM Template based on the VMware assembly.
  6. Edit the Oracle VM Template that was created.
  7. Create a guest based on the Oracle VM Template that was created.
  8. Verify and then start the Oracle VM guest that was created.
  9. Manually modify the guest configuration and remove VMware tools.
  10. Switch from the Red Hat kernel to Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for free.
  11. Transform the guest into a usable Oracle VM Template ("gold image").

You can run the lab anytime you like on your laptop, or you can attend OTN's next Virtual SA Day, and run it with the help of a proctor. There will be several hundred sysadmins running the same lab at the same time, so you can discuss it with others via chat, and get help from our proctors. Details here.

photograph of a brewery in Ouray, Colorado, by Rick Ramsey

- Rick

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Thursday Dec 19, 2013

Next Virtual Sysadmin Day Is On Jan 28

OTN's next virtual sysadmin day is on January 28. It's four hours long, from 9:00 am - 1:00 pm PT. (Time converter here.) This time we have a whole new set of hands-on labs for Oracle Solaris, Oracle Linux, and Oracle VM. Proctored, of course, which means you can ask questions. The labs in our previous virtual sysadmin day focused on the basics. These focus on using these technologies in real-world scenarios. Click on the Agenda tab in the registration page to see the labs.

The event is free, but you do need to register. And there's a little homework involved. Nothing too complicated. We just expect you to have VirtualBox installed and the proper images already imported before we begin class. Click on the the Instructions tab for more info.

Register here.

Picture is of Mosquito Pass, in Colorado, taken from Mosquito Gulch. You need a 4x4 with good ground clearance to get up and over the top, and the rocks on the road will slice up your tires unless they're good and thick. A great place to catch your breath after you finish the hands-on labs.

- Rick

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Tuesday Nov 19, 2013

Extending Your Use of DTrace on Oracle Linux

We just published a new article about using DTrace on Oracle Linux (see below). If you're not already familiar with DTrace on Oracle Linux, you might want to start with these two blogs.

Blog: Trying Out DTrace

by Wim Coekaerts

In October of 2011 Wim Coekaerts described the steps required to use the preview of DTrace on Oracle Linux, and provided a simple example of how to use it.

Blog: How to Get Started Using DTrace on Oracle Linux

by Rick Ramsey

In January of 2013 I described some of the resources that had recently become available to help you start using DTrace on Oracle Linux. They included a video interview with Brendan Gregg, a way to find out which DTrace probes are available on Oracle Linux, a technical article, a book, and more.

New Article: How to Set Up DTrace to Detect PHP Scripting Problems on Oracle Linux

by Christopher Jones

Christopher Jones has just published an OTN tech article that explains how to set up DTrace to detect PHP scripting problems on Oracle Linux. He shows you how to download and install the right version of Oracle Linux, how to install PHP and the OIC18 extensions for Oracle Database, how to verify which PHP probes you have, and how to begin using them.

photograph of Colorado sunset by Beth Ramsey


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Monday Sep 23, 2013

Live Video Interviews on OTN Central at Oracle OpenWorld 2013

Good thing I drove to Oracle OpenWorld this year instead of riding the moto like I have on some previous OOW's. We had an inch of slush on Donner pass, and if we hadn't skeedaddled outta there when we did, we might have wound up like the ATV in my driveway in Colorado.

This year Oracle wants its customers to talk about their experiences with Oracle technologies, so OTN has lined up three live interviews. If you're at Oracle OpenWorld, you can watch them on the big screens. If you're not at the event, you can still watch them live from our home page at If you want to watch them later, look for a future blog in which I'll post the location of the recorded interviews.

Monday, 12:00 noon PT - John Dome, Systems Engineering Lead, Progressive Insurance

John will describe the business opportunity that lead Progressive Insurance to switch from Red Hat Linux to Oracle Linux, he'll explain why he recommended they switch, the results they got, and how it has changed the way Progressive's DBA's and SA's work together. We'll try to get as techie as we can in the time we have.

Tuesday, 11:50 am PT - Gautham Sampath, Chief Information Technologist, Pinellas County Government

Gautham (pronounced like Batman's Gotham) recently led an effort to refresh the Pinellas County hardware systems. He'll explain what they were looking for, why they chose Oracle Exalytics, how they became convinced it was the right decision, and how it changed the way they managed their data center.

Wednesday, 11:00 am PT - Brian Bream, CTO, Collier IT

Brian Bream, Chief Technology Officer of Collier IT, will describe the biggest changes data centers must deal with today, and how Collier IT recommends they face them. When we're done, he'll confess how he deals with his personal addiction to SPARC systems and the Oracle Solaris operating system.

Plus recorded videos

We're also going to have a snowsquallfull of recorded interviews, which we'll begin posting during the evenings, since going to all-night parties is getting harder and harder to recover from. Look for them on OTN Garage YouTube Channel.

- Rick

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Monday Sep 09, 2013

Latest Linux-Related Content on OTN

photograph copyright 2013 by Rick Ramsey

How to Launch Linux Utilities from Inside Oracle Database

by Yuli Vasiliev

By wrapping a Linux utility in a script and using an external database table's preprocessor directive, you can launch the utility from within Oracle Database and have the utility's output be inserted into the external table. This allows you to do things such as query operating system data and then join it with data in Oracle Database.

How to Use Hardware Fault Management in Oracle Linux

by Robert Chase

Robert Chase is a really good writer. If he was writing about teaching iguanas how to quilt I'd still read it. Fortunately, in this article he's writing about hardware fault management tools in Oracle Linux. What they are, how they work, what you can do with them, and examples with instructions. Give it a read.

How to Get Started Using DTrace on Oracle Linux

by Richard Friedman

DTrace is a powerful tool, and it can do some amazing things. But it's not that difficult to get started doing simple things. You can build up from there. In this article, Richard Friedman gives you a high-level overview of DTrace and its major components:providers, modules, functions, and probes. He explains how you can use either one-liner commands on the command line, or write more complex instructions in scripts, using the D language. He provides simple examples for each. It's a great way to get your feet wet.

Blog: Overview of Linux Containers

by Lenz Grimmer

Linux Containers isolate individual services, applications, or even a complete Linux operating system from other services running on the same host. They use a completely different approach than "classicial" virtualization technologies like KVM or Xen. Lenz Grimmer explains.

Blog: Practical Examples of Working With Oracle Linux Containers

by Lenz Grimmer

In his previous post about Linux Containers, Lenz Grimmer explained what they are and how they work. In this post, he provides a few practical examples to get you started working with them.

Video Interview: On Wim's Mind in August

by Lenz Grimmer

We ran a little long, but once Wim started talking about the history of SNMP and how he's been using it of late to do cool things with KSplice and Oracle VM, we geeked out. Couldn't stop. Wim is not your average Senior VP of Engineering. Definitely a hands-on guy who enjoys figuring out new ways to use technology

Video Interview: On Wim's Mind in June

by Lenz Grimmer

On Wim's Mind in June 2013 - Wim's team is currently working on DTrace userspace probes. They let developers add probes to an application before releasing it. Sysadmins can enable these probes to diagnose problems with the application, not just the kernel. Trying this out on MySQL, first. If you know how to do this on Solaris, already, you'll be able to apply that knowledge to Oracle Linux. Also on Wim's mind is the Playground channel on the Public Yum repository, which lets you play with the latest Linux builds, ahead of official Linux releases, without worrying about having your system configured properly.

- Rick

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Logan Rosenstein
and members of the OTN community


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