Wednesday Jan 21, 2015

Hands On Labs for C, C++, Fortran (and Java) Developers

I've always been a fan of Oracle Solaris Studio because it's the tool of choice for bad.ass developers. Java developers are ubiquitous, Database developers get more attention here at Oracle, and marketing apps generate a lot of buzz nowadays. But Fortran, C, and C++ developers bend big iron to their will. So I'm pumped that OTN's upcoming Virtual Tech Summit (VTS) will feature two 90-minute hands-on labs proctored by members of the Oracle Solaris Studio engineering team.

Lab: How to Use the Code Analyzer in Oracle Solaris Studio

moderated by Joseph Raja
Note:Instructions will be posted here before the end of January.

The Code Analyzer is a suite of tools designed to work with the Studio C/C++ compiler to identify issues in source code. The tools in this suite are

  • Previse, for compile-time checking of errors e.g. exceeding array bounds, infinite loops, etc.
  • Discover, to identify memory leak and memory corruption issues at run time, etc.
  • Uncover, to verify test coverage and identify sections of code not being tested
  • Codean, allows comparative analysis of error report across large projects
  • Code-analyzer, an intuitive GUI that allows analyzing and fixing the errors.

This lab will show you how to identify and rectify errors with these tools.

Lab: How to Use the Performance Analyzer in Oracle Solaris Studio

moderated by Eugene Loh
Note:Instructions will be posted here before the end of January.

The Performance Analyzer is a GUI and CLI tool for examining the performance of Java, C, C++, and Fortran applications and relating it back to constructs in the source code (functions, call stacks, source code lines, data structures, etc.) so that application performance can be understood and improved. The tool can examine time spent, Solaris microstates, hardware counters (cache and TLB misses, branch mispredicts,and so on), I/O operations, heap memory usage, synchronization locks, etc. Data collection is typically statistical, giving representative results with minimal invasiveness, even on highly optimized code. It is possible to profile the Solaris kernel. A timeline display shows load imbalances, synchronization, and different phases of execution.

This lab will help you become familiar with the basic operations of the Performance Analyzer.

Registration

About the Photograph

That's a picture of my daughter and two of her friends preparing for their next hand-to-hand combat session during Basic Training, affectionately referred to as "Beast" at the US Air Force Academy. If they were developers, they'd be Systems developers.

- Rick

Follow Rick on:
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Friday Dec 19, 2014

Three New Dev Tips for C++ Developers

How to Find Out What Resources Your Application Has Used

by Darry Gove

If you want to know how much CPU, memory, or other resources your application has used, you can pre-load a library and define a .fini method that prints out the results. You can also take advantage of the getusage call, which provides some information about CPU time and processes. But more information is available. Darryl provides examples of how to use these two components plus others that fill in the details.

How To Rapidly Identify Performance Opportunities

by Darry Gove

Profiling is critical to improving application performance. Without profiling, it is very easy to guess where the application is spending cycles, and then expend effort optimizing code that has little effect on overall performance. Oracle Solaris Studio 12.4 provides an overview screen designed to focus you on the metrics with the most promise. Darryl Gove walks you through the overview screen and explains what it indicates about your application.

Dev Tip: How to Get Finer Grained Control of Debugging Information

by Ivan Soleimanipour

The new options in Oracle Solaris Studio 12.4 provide much finer-grained control over debug information, which allows you to choose how much information is provided and reduce the amount of disk space needed for the executable. Ivan enumerates the options and provides examples of how to use them.

About the Photograph

I took the picture of the 01 Ducati 748S this summer, in Colorado. It currently has about 1300 miles on the odometer.

- Rick

Follow Rick on:
Personal Blog | Personal Twitter | Oracle Community Profile
  Follow OTN Garage on:
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Wednesday Mar 26, 2014

If You Have to Ask, You Wouldn't Understand

Although being subjected to that kind of attitude is unpleasant, subjecting someone else to it is loads of fun. Just ask someone who rides a Harley why they ride a Harley, and watch how much they enjoy unloading that sentiment on your head, you member of the unwashed, you.

I feel the same way about Oracle Solaris. Don't talk to me about how much Windows or some other OS is capable of doing. I don't care. Your OS is a metric cruiser. Go away.

That feeling of vast superiority is even more pronounced when I'm talking about Oracle Solaris Studio. Which should have been renamed Oracle Solaris and Oracle Linux Studio, if you are insightful enough to ask me, because any Linux developer who is working on anything remotely interesting should be using Oracle Solaris Studio as their IDE. I freakin love it. I've had the pleasure of interviewing Don Kretch, the head of the Solaris Studio engineering team, many times. And I've enjoyed myself every single time. If you think you're worthy, you are welcome to try to understand our conversation (jump to "Interviews with Don Kretch," below).

If my rhetoric has convinced you, as it would convince anyone of vastly superior intelligence, you'll want to pretend that you already knew how good Oracle Solaris (and Linux) Studio is, and berate me for even suggesting you didn't. Good for you. You're catching on. But you'll still be faced with a dearth of actual knowledge about this IDE for the Vastly Intelligent.

Not to worry. There's a way for you to learn what you need to learn without anyone else finding out so you can pretend to have known all along.

Oracle Solaris (and Linux) Studio 12.4 Beta Program

The Beta Program for Oracle Solaris Studio 12.4 begins today. Download the software, try out its new features, and join in the discussions. These resources will help:

Landing Page, including links to Beta Program Forums
Download Center, where you can download a free copy

Interviews with Don Kretch

About the Photograph

Photograph of 2002 Harley Davidson Softail Deuce taken by Rick Ramsey in Massachusetts, USA.

- Rick

Follow me on:
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About

Contributors:
Rick Ramsey
Kemer Thomson
and members of the OTN community

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