Friday Jan 31, 2014

Simplifying the Installation of Oracle Database on Oracle Linux - Reprint








Most of my workdays start by shapechanging me into a seven-headed Hydra, and each Hydra promptly makes a beeline for multi-tasking hell. So, when I get a chance to simplify something, anything, I jump on it.

Ginny has done that for OTN at last twice. Below are two of her exercises in simplifying our lives. We published these articles before, but we recently had to rebuild one of them because somebody (I'm not going to say who) deleted it. To avoid annoying one of your Hydras, and instead send you off to a peaceful weekend, here they are again.









How I Simplified Oracle Database Installation on Oracle Linux 5

by Ginny Henningsen

Before installing Oracle Database 10g or 11g on a system, you need to preconfigure the operating environment since the database requires certain software packages, package versions, and tweaks to kernel parameters. Ginny discovered that Oracle Linux provides a remarkably easy way to address these installation prerequisites. Find out how.

How I Simplified Oracle Database 11g and 12c Installation on Oracle Linux 6

by Ginny Henningsen

Similar to the article above, but updated for Database 12c and Oracle Linux 6. Ginny simplifies the installation of Oracle Database 11g by automatically pre-configuring Oracle Linux with the required software packages and correct kernel parameters.

Photograph of Fat Boy on Sakajawea Road in Idaho taken by Rick Ramsey

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Tuesday Jan 07, 2014

Tips for Using Linux Huge Pages

Ed Whalen is the Chief Technologist at Performance Tuning Corp. He knows an awful lot about making databases run faster, including the use of Linux Huge Pages. Here are two of his very helpful resources.

Tech Article: How to Configure x86 Memory Performance for Large Databases

by Ed Whalen, Oracle ACE

Performance issues in large databases are not easy to detect using normal analysis methods such as AWR reports and OS tools such as sar, top, and iostat. And yet, if you configure your memory appropriately in x86 environments, your database can run significantly faster. This article describes you can use Linux Huge Pages to do just that.

Ed covers x86 virtual memory architecture, Linux memory management, and enabling Linux Huge Pages. See the article here.

Video Interview: What Are Linux Huge Pages?

with Ed Whalen, Oracle ACE

Ed Whalen, Oracle ACE, explains Linux huge pages, the huge performance increase they provide, and how sysadmins and DBA's need to work together to use them properly. Taped at Oracle Open World 2013.

photograph of cliff face in Perry Park, Colorado, copyright Rick Ramsey

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Monday Nov 11, 2013

Why Move My Oracle Database to New SPARC Hardware?

If you didn't manage to catch all the news during the proverbial Firehose Down the Throat that is Oracle OpenWorld, you'll enjoy these short recaps from Brad Carlile. He makes things clear in just a couple of minutes. photograph copyright by Edge of Day Photography, with permission

Video: Latest Improvements to Oracle SPARC Processors

with Brad Carlile

T5, M5, and M6. Three wicked fast processors that Oracle announced over the last year. Brad Carlile explains how much faster they are, and why they are better than previous versions.

Video: Why Move Your Oracle Database to SPARC Servers

with Brad Carlile

If I'm happy with how my Oracle Database 11g is performing, why should I deploy it on the new Oracle SPARC hardware? For the same reasons that you would want to buy a sports car that goes twice as fast AND gets better gas mileage, Brad Carlile explains. Well, if there are such dramatic performance improvements and cost savings, then why should I move up to Oracle Database 12c?

-Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Personal Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Tuesday Jul 09, 2013

The Case for Running Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Solaris

You may have already seen some of these individually, but here are several resources that explain why Oracle Database 12c runs so well on Oracle Solaris and SPARC.

Oracle Solaris 11 + SPARC

Interviews with experts, videos, architectural papers, technical articles, and other resources to help you understand the optimizations between the OS and hardware layers that make Oracle Solaris and SPARC such a winning combination. link

Oracle Solaris 11 + Oracle Database 12c

A deeper dive into the optimizations and capabilities of Oracle Solaris that make it such a good platform for Oracle database 12c. link

Oracle Solaris 11 + Oracle Stack

A high-level overview of the optimizations in Oracle Solaris 11 that make it an excellent platform for the entire Oracle stack. link

Article: How Oracle Solaris 11 Makes Oracle Database So Fast

A technical explanation of the optimizations that make Oracle Database run so fast on Oracle Solaris 11. Memory, critical threads, kernel acceleration, virtualization and resource management, and much more. By Ginny Henningsen. link

Screencast: Outliers

In this screencast, Jon Haslam describes how the Oracle Database and Oracle Solaris engineering teams worked together to integrate DTrace and V$ Views to provide a top-to-bottom picture of a database transaction I/O -- from storage devices, through the Oracle Solaris kernel, up to Oracle Database 12c itself. With this end-to-end view, you can easily identify I/O outliers -- transactions that are taking an unusually long time to complete -- and use this comprehensive data to identify and mitigate storage system problems that were previously extremely hard to debug. link

And Don't Forget ...

WebCast: Introducing Oracle Database 12c

Oracle prez Mark Hurd and friends will be talking about the pluggable databases capability in Oracle Database 12c’s new multitenant architecture. No, they do not let you pause a running database with a cork, unfortunately, but they do make it easy to consolidate onto the cloud. Topics covered:

  • Simplify database consolidation
  • Automatically compress and tier data
  • Improve database and application continuity
  • Redact sensitive data
  • And as an added bonus, hear Tom Kyte’s “Top 12 Features of Oracle Database 12c.”

It's on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 at 9 a.m. PT / 12 p.m. ET. link .

Blogs with Solaris-related Content

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Friday Jun 21, 2013

How Oracle Solaris Makes the Database Scream

Few things are as satisfying as a screaming burnout (image removed from blog). When Oracle Database engineers team up with Oracle Solaris engineers, they do a lot of them. Here are a few of the reasons why.

Article: How the OS Makes the Database Fast - Oracle Solaris

For applications that rely on Oracle Database, a high-performance operating system translates into faster transactions, better scalability to support more users, and the ability to support larger capacity databases. When deployed in virtualized environments, multiple Oracle Database servers can be consolidated on the same physical server. Ginny Henningsen describes what Oracle Solaris does to make the Oracle database run faster.

Video Interview: Why Is The OS Still Relevant?

In a world of increasing virtualization and growing interest in cloud services, why is the OS still relevant? Michael Palmeter, senior director of Oracle Solaris, explains why it's not only relevant, but essential for data centers that care about performance.

Interview: An Engineer's Perspective: Why the OS Is Still Relevant

Sysadmins are handling hundreds or perhaps thousands of VM's. What is it about Solaris that makes it such a good platform for managing those VM's? Liane Praza, senior engineer in the Solaris core engineering group provides an engineer's perspective.

Interview in the Lab: How to Get the Performance Promised by Oracle's T5 SPARC Chips

If you want your applications to run on the new SPARC T5/M5 chips, how do you make sure they use all that new performance? Don Kretsch, Senior Director of Engineering, explains.

Interview: Why Oracle Database Engineering Uses Oracle Solaris Studio

The design priorities for Oracle Solaris Studio are performance, observability, and productivity. Why this is good for ISV's and developers, and why it's so important to the Oracle database engineering team. Taped in Oct 2012.

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Monday Apr 01, 2013

Oracle To Acquire Ducati

source

"To handle all that speed and power, today's high-performance motorcycles need traction control, active suspension, ABS, and a multitude of electronic systems that gather an enormous amount of data. Oracle Database is uniquely positioned to process that data at the speeds today's riders require to remain competitive. And, with the Oracle Cloud, that data and those services are available from even the most remote racing circuits on the planet."

Several well placed sources inside both companies confirmed high-level discussions and high speed laps around the streets of Bologna between Oracle and Ducati executives over the last few weeks.

"Oracle is obsessed with speed. Just look at what they did with the SPARC systems last week. And Ducati? Need we say more?"

Industry pundits agree that there is a natural symbiosis between the two corporate cultures. But that's not the only reason for an acquisition of Ducati by Oracle.

"The high tech industry is highly competitive and Oracle is always looking for ways to reduce costs. By joining forces with Ducati, the combined companies can realize a significant discount on red paint."

"Imagine the parties!" a member of the Oracle Technology Network said in response to the speculation. "Oracle Open World! World Ducati Week. Both in San Francisco. It blows my mind."

"We will not turn San Francisco into another MotoGP circuit," the mayor of San Francisco assured concerned citizens while behind him executives of both companies discussed the merits of different routes around, over, and through Nob Hill.

"Lombard Street on a Desmosedici? I'm coming back!"
- Valentino Rossi

As you can imagine, at the OTN Garage, we're thrilled by the possibilities, and we'll be following this story closely.

"Oracle does not comment on potential acquisitions. This is probably some dumb April Fools prank."
- Oracle spokesperson

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Friday Aug 03, 2012

My Oracle RAC and Oracle Solaris Cluster Cheet Sheet

This gets complicated, so stop watching motoGP crash compilation videos for a sec.

We have Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC). RAC lets you deploy a single Oracle Database across different servers. If the server in your Des Moines data center gets picked up by a tornado that hates you and dropped off in East Texas, the other servers pick up the load, and the database continues to operate without interruption. That's easy to understand.

We also have Oracle Solaris Cluster. It lets you deploy the Oracle Solaris operating system across different servers. If the server in your Barbados data center gets washed away by a hurricane that hates you and dropped off in West Africa, the other servers pick up the load, and the operating system continues to operate without interruption. A good quote:

White Paper: Extending Oracle Solaris for Business Continuity
"Oracle Solaris Cluster offers comprehensive and robust capabilities for keeping your business IT, including those running Oracle Database and Applications, up and running in the face of nearly every conceivable situation."

That's easy to understand, as well.

So why would somebody complicate our sysadmin lives by suggesting we install Oracle RAC on Oracle Solaris Cluster? What would that be, highly-available high availability?

Turns out that's not what they're suggesting. They're suggesting we install Oracle RAC not on Solaris Clusters, but on zone clusters. What's a zone cluster, you ask?

A zone cluster is a cluster created from Solaris zones that are physically located on different servers. That's similar to a regular cluster, but it uses zones instead of entire OS instances. Don't confuse a zone cluster with a failover cluster. Instead, read this white paper:

White Paper: Zone Clusters: How to Deploy Virtual Clusters and Why
This paper introduces the zone cluster, a virtual cluster in which an Oracle Solaris Zone is configured as a virtual node. The zone cluster supports the consolidation of multiple cluster applications on a single cluster.

That's all very interesting, but what about our original question:

Why would someone want to complicate our sysadmin lives by suggesting we install Oracle RAC on a zone cluster?

Turns out there two good reasons:

  • It's a better high-availability solution for a multi-tier application environment
  • It lets you isolate your database development, test, and deployment environments from each other.

How the Oracle RAC/Zone Cluster Combo Is Better For Multi-Tier Applications

Let's say that you are using your Oracle database as one tier in two different application environments. The first one is an HR application, the one second is an e-business suite. Both access the same database. Well, Oracle RAC would give you the high-availability for that database. But the applications would not be highly available. However, if you installed the database with Oracle RAC inside one zone cluster, and each application inside its own zone cluster, you'd make both application environments highly avaiable. And, if you limit the administrative privileges for each zone cluster, you'd get administrative isolation, as well.

How the Oracle RAC/Zone Cluster Combo Is Safer for Deployment

You've probably heard by now about Knight Capital Group's trading glitch that dropped the company's value by 50% in one day. I don't know exactly what happened, but I wonder if they didn't deploy either their development or their test environment instead of the one that was ready for prime time.

I suppose it's a sysadmin's duty to learn from another sysadmin's misfortune. So, if you divide your zone clusters into development, test, and deployment environments, you might have a better shot at avoiding a similar catastrophe. For example, install Oracle RAC with an Oracle DB into your development zone cluster, and keep it isolated from your test and deployment zone clusters. One sysadmin controls the development cluster. Another the test cluster. And the biggest, baddest sysadmin controls the deployment cluster. When the development environment is ready for testing, the test admin must OK the migration. That goes double for the deployment environment. And all the while, each environment remains highly available.

Resources

Turns out that Oracle and the portion of Oracle that was once Sun Microsystems have been collaborating on Oracle RAC/Solaris Cluster solutions for a long time. Customers like this approach so much that we just published three articles explaining how to do it. Each article covers a different version of the software:

Article RAC Version Solaris Version Cluster Version
How to Deploy Oracle RAC 11.2.0.2 on Oracle Solaris Zone Clusters 11.2.0.2 10 3.3
How to Deploy Oracle RAC 11.2.0.3 on Oracle Solaris Zone Clusters 11.2.0.3 10 3.3
How to Deploy Oracle RAC 11.2.0.3 on Oracle Solaris 11 Zone Clusters 11.2.0.3 11 4.0

And if you want more, we also have a page full of links to all our Solaris Cluster how-to articles and background white papers:

Where to find everything Solaris Cluster-related

Don't be the sysadmin who bankrupts your company in one day. Get educated.

- Rick

Website Newsletter Facebook Twitter

Friday Dec 16, 2011

Two Sysadmin Articles Make OTN's Top 20

In the OTN blog, Justin reports that two sysadmin-related articles made OTN's top 20 list for 2011:

Number 2
Taking Your First Steps with Oracle Solaris 11
- by Brian Leonard and Glenn Brunette

Number 11
How I Simplified the Installation of Oracle Database on Oracle Linux
- by Ginny Henningsen

Boo-yah!

The good work of Brian, Glenn, and Ginny makes those of us in the Systems Community of OTN particularly proud because the number of OTN readers who are system admins and developers is dwarfed by the number who are Java developers. Even making the top 20 is notable. To Brian, Glenn, and Ginny, a heartfelt:

- Rick

Website
Newsletter
Facebook
Twitter

Friday Jul 15, 2011

Using Oracle Solaris Resource Manager with Oracle Database Resource Manager

photo courtesy of Square Space.

I don't like to budget my spending, I don't like to count my calories, and I don't like to plan my rides too carefully. Takes all the adventure out of life.

But it's different at work.

If you are accustomed to working with either the resource manager for Oracle Solaris or the resource manager for Oracle Database, you may be wondering what the other resource manager is for. Can you simply pretend it doesn't exist until the quarter is over? Or will it act like your wife's cat and break something if you ignore it? Could it, perhaps, be better than the one you're used to? What if you combined them?

This might help ...

Introduction to Consolidated Resource Management with Oracle Database and Oracle Solaris

This white paper not only describes the differences between Oracle's Solaris resource manager and its database resource manager, it shows you how to use them together in the best way. Apparently that's referred to as consolidated resource management. (If you ask me, they shoulda called it amalgamated resource management, but the people in the Naming Department stopped consulting me years ago, after I suggested they name the next SunOS Jaws.)

(Think about it. Java on Jaws. It woulda rocked.)

Anyhow, because it is a white paper, it does spend a little time talking about resource management in general and the role of Oracle's resource managers in server workload consolidation. Did you know that resource management is particularly good at maintaining a service level agreement (SLA)? It makes sense, right, but it's not something I would have used to start a conversation in a biker bar. What I did know is that SLA used to mean Symbionese Liberation Army).

Control mechanisms, which resource manager to use for what, and how this all plays in a high-availability environment are also covered in this first of four papers on resource management. Read it. You'll learn a lot that you thought you already knew.

- Rick
System Admin and Developer Community of OTN
OTN Garage Blog
OTN Garage on Facebook
OTN Garage on Twitter

Thursday Apr 07, 2011

Cloning for Dummies

Clone TrooperIf it seems like we have published a lot of articles around the Sun ZFS Storage Appliance, it is because we have. Busy Oracle engineer and frequent contributor Sridhar Ranganathan has handed us another jewel: Oracle Database Cloning Solution Using Oracle Recovery Manager and Sun ZFS Storage Appliance. What a great pair of topics!

Let's forget for a minute that I work for Oracle, the leading database company in the World: that is a relatively new phenomenon. The truth is I've always known that databases dominate the solutions that computer hardware enables. Indeed, I vividly remember the early 1980s, when the emerging personal computer market was propelled largely by two primitive database applications: for balancing checkbooks and saving recipes. When Apple announced their new soft-sectored floppy drive, we had to get onto a waiting list to buy 360 KB of random access disk for our puny databases. The CEO of General Dynamics, where I worked at the time, discovered this power and the company was transformed almost overnight from analog to digital.

There are many important things DBAs do to secure their hefty compensation (had I anticipated that trend, I would have started off as a DBA, rather than as an actuary. Wait! I'm afraid there wasn't even the acronym "DBA" way back then...) One of these activities is that of cloning databases, which is done for a variety of reasons, including development, testing, and training without disrupting the actual database itself. As Sridhar points out, the Sun ZFS Storage Appliance provides an ideal platform for performing database cloning. It comes with a user-friendly interface for ease of management, a full set of data services for business continuity and disaster recovery purposes, multi-protocol support to cater to any infrastructure, analytics for monitoring and resolution purposes, and a hybrid storage pool for faster response time for test, development, and QA activities. With unlimited snapshots and cloning possibilities, many concurrent database instances can be launched for various purposes without impacting the production database.

This paper gives you a good look at the power of the graphical front end, includes examples, recommendations, best practices, and sizing considerations. As I said, this is another jewel, not to be missed.

- Kemer

About

Contributors:
Rick Ramsey
Kemer Thomson
and members of the OTN community

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
13
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today
Blogs We Like