Monday Jan 13, 2014

Lab - How to Deploy Oracle Software in Minutes Using Oracle VM Templates

In my first 12 years of school I had a natural ability in Math and Science, but had to work hard at English and History.

When I went to college, I didn't do well in Math and Science, so I transferred into Liberal Arts, where strangely enough, I did well. After all these years I just realized why. I never had to study for Math and Science. I just understood the material. If I did any homework, I did it during class. Which means I never listened to lectures. As a result, I never learned how to learn what I didn't know. So, when college presented me with more advanced topics that I couldn't just grok, I didn't know what to do. I fell behind. I assumed I wasn't any good. The opposite was true with Liberal Arts. Literature, History, Economics, it all confused me. So I listened in class. And I studied after class. SoI did well.

And that's why I'm not an engineer.

If you're a hands-on learner like me and Joel Schallhorn, the guy doing bicycle tricks in the picture, you'll appreciate our latest hands-on lab.

Lab: How to Deploy a Four-Node Oracle RAC 12c Cluster in Minutes, Using Oracle VM Templates

Hands-On Lab by Olivier Canonge with contributions from Christophe Pauliat, Simon Coter, Saar Maoz, Doan Nguyen, Ludovic Sorriaux, Cecile Naud, and Robbie De Meyer

This lab demonstrates how easy it is to deploy software environments with Oracle VM Templates. It uses a single-instance, Oracle Restart (Single-Instance High Availability [SIHA]), and Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC) for Oracle Database as an example. During this lab, you are going to deploy a four-node Flex Cluster (three hubs and one leaf) with a dedicated network for Oracle Flex ASM traffic.

See more of Joel Schallhorn on Instagram | Facebook | YouTube

- Rick

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Tuesday May 22, 2012

Cluster Fest

It's been a couple of months since we focused on Oracle Solaris Cluster. If you're a fan, we have some new content that will interest you. See below. (If you're new to Solaris Cluster, in particular how to use it in a virtual environment, see "Recent Technical Articles About Oracle Solaris Cluster," further down.)

New Technical Articles About Oracle Solaris Cluster

How to Upgrade to Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0
If you are running Oracle Solaris Cluster 3.3 5/11 on Oracle Solaris 10 and want to upgrade to Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0 running on Oracle Solaris 11, consider using the Oracle Solaris Cluster Geographic Edition software. It makes the job easier and keeps downtime to a minimum. Tim Read wrote this 8-part article to show you how. Contents are:

How to Deploy Oracle RAC on Zone Clusters
This one is very cool. Oracle Solaris Cluster lets you create clusters of Solaris zones. That gives you high availability. You also get high availability from Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC). So why would you install RAC on zone clusters? Because you can implement a multi-tiered database environment that isolates database tiers and administrative domains from each other, while taking advantage of centralized (and simpler) cluster administration. This article explains how to do it.

Recent Technical Resources About Oracle Solaris Cluster

Blog: How to Survive the End of the World - Part I
Provides a simple example of a two-node cluster, and provides resources to help you create one.

How to Survive the End of the World - Part II
Changes the 2-node example above into a failover cluster, and provides resources to help you create one.

As always you can find the latest technical resources to help you evaluate, test, and deploy Oracle Solaris Cluster on OTN's Cluster Resources for Sysadmins and Developers

- Rick

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Monday Jan 23, 2012

How to Survive the End of the World - Part II

In Part I of our Survival Guide for Civilization, I explained how to save civilization by identifying four distant planets that had the essential building blocks of civilization and combining them into a 5-node cluster with Earth:

Building BlockDistant Planet
--------------------------------------
footballDitka
cheerleadersDallas
beerBud
bratsMilwaukee
--------------------------------------
civilizationbackup civilization

As mentioned in Part I, the resulting five-node cluster was actually more than what we wanted. Five distant planets! We'd rather not deal with the overhead of managing five distant planets. We prefer to keep managing just one planet, but make sure that can keep civilization humming. Turns out that we can accomplish that through the magic of virtualization. As you might expect, it's called a virtual cluster. (Really techie people call it a failover zone cluster.)

First, we create one zone on Earth for each building block:

Building BlockZone on Earth
--------------------------------------
footballfootball-zone
cheerleaderscheerleader-zone
beerbeer-zone
bratsbrats-zone
--------------------------------------
civilizationcivilization zones

Then we create one failover zone on each distant planet for each zone on Earth:

Zone on EarthFailover ZoneDistant Planet
---------------------------------------------------------
football-zonefootball-failover-zoneDitka
cheerleaderscheerleaders-failover-zoneDallas
beerbeer-failover-zoneBud
bratsbrats-failover-zoneMilwaukee
---------------------------------------------------------
zone civilizationfailover zone civilization

In this way, each failover zone on its distant planet backs up one original zone on Earth. It's a great way to save civilization with much less overhead.

As it turns out, not only do we have an article that shows you how to create a cluster with Solaris Cluster 4.0, but we have one that shows you how to create a failover cluster, too:

How to Create A Failover Zone Cluster

Give it a try. It never hurts to be prepared.

- Rick
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Thursday Dec 15, 2011

How to Survive the End of the World - Part I

If you've been paying attention you'll probably agree that Earth will be destroyed any day, now.

That used to concern me.

But the more I understand clustering, the more I realize we can simply reconstitute civilization from individual slices of other planets in the Universe. The first thing we need to do is identify the building blocks of an advanced civilization. That should be relatively simple:

football
+cheerleaders
+beer
+brats
-------------------
civilization

Next, find planets that had excellent examples of each building block:

Building BlockBackup Planet
-------------------
footballDitka
cheerleadersDallas
beerBud
bratsMilwaukee
--------------------------------------
civilizationbackup civilization

Those four planets plus Earth would be easy enough to arrange into a high-availability cluster if we downloaded and installed Oracle Solaris 11 and Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0 on each planet, including Earth.

With Solaris Cluster 4.0, we could create a nice five-node cluster. Not only would the cluster provide the disaster recovery we're looking for, but it would actually help us create an elastic cloud of sorts, in which we could, for instance, tap into the beer of planet Bud during the Super Bowl or other times of dire need. See What's New to read about other cool things you can do with Solaris Cluster 4.0.

Creating a five-node cluster can get a bit tricky, but you can build up your skills by creating a smaller one, using the instructions in this OTN article:

How to Install and Configure a Two Node Cluster

Once you have the two-node setup figured out, you can move to the five-node setup. But the resulting five-node cluster is actually more than what we want, isn't it? It's a cluster of five entire planets, when what we're looking for is a slice of each planet. In an upcoming blog I'll summarize how to create a cluster from the slices of those individual planets. That's called a virtual cluster or a zone cluster, and it's very cool.

- Rick

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Monday Mar 28, 2011

Dancing in Traffix

Traffic Cop

We published an interesting article last week that would seem to have a narrow focus, but in fact covers some fundamental architectural principles that I suspect you can apply to your enterprise.

As Wikipedia puts it, Diameter is an authentication, authorization and accounting protocol for computer networks, and a successor to RADIUS. In fact, its name is a pun on radius. Diameter provides backward compatibility, with additional functionality. Diameter is twice the radius ... get it? Traffix Systems is the leading Diameter protocol solutions vendor. This paper shows how our lab rats optimized Traffix Systems' Long Term Evolution (LTE) Traffix Diameter Load Balancer and Traffix Diameter Router using features of Oracle's software and hardware. This results in all the things you want to hear: greater throughput and resiliency, while reducing hardware and software costs. The latter is what your IT Manager and CFO want to hear.

Burt GummerThe same things that helped in this instance will benefit most other solutions. The solution is built on top of Oracle Solaris Cluster to provide both high availability and load balancing. Performance gains result from the intelligent use of Oracle Solaris Containers and Oracle Solaris' ability to squeeze the most out of multithreaded applications on our T-Series servers. Finally, there is something even more fundamental: the optimized TCP/IP stack on Oracle Solaris, which results in better network performance. Combine these the right way – or as Burt Gummer put it in Tremors, 'A few household chemicals in the proper proportions' – and you have a plan!

So, for a great read with some interesting test results, don't miss Orgad Kimchi's How Traffix Systems Optimized Its LTE Diameter Load Balancing and Routing Solutions Using Oracle Hardware and Software.

Traffix

- Kemer

Thursday Dec 16, 2010

A Real Cutting Edge

BladeWhat could be more "cutting edge" than a fine blade?

Blade server architectures blend the enterprise availability and management features of vertically scalable platforms with the scalability and economic advantages of horizontally scalable systems by providing higher compute density, reduced complexity, and improved availability, serviceability, and power efficiency. It's no wonder that blade architectures are cutting into traditional enterprise server architectures.

To bring you up to speed with Oracle's blade solutions we have recently published two technical papers worth a serious look. The first is a refresh of our hardware architecture overview, Sun Blade 6000 Modular Systems from Oracle. This comprehensive paper tells you everything you need to know about our complete solution, from the powerful chassis to the wide selection of blade modules: you have a choice of chip design, Intel Xeon or Oracle SPARC.

The second blade paper is hot off the press: Best Practices and Guidelines for Deploying the Oracle VM Blade Cluster Reference Configuration. The Oracle VM blade cluster reference configuration offers a simple approach that speeds deployment and reduces risk. It is a single-vendor solution for the entire hardware and software stack and can be deployed in hours rather than weeks. The reference configuration has gone through Oracle Validated Configuration testing, resulting in a pre-tested, validated configuration that can significantly reduce testing time as well as the time-consuming effort of determining a stable configuration. This paper provides recommendations and best practices for optimizing virtualization infrastructures when deploying this powerful and flexible cluster reference configuration.

Kemer

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Contributors:
Rick Ramsey
Kemer Thomson
and members of the OTN community

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