Monday Aug 06, 2012

Basic and Advanced System Services Administration in Oracle Solaris 11

Does taming the behavior of your OS services manually make you feel less than your usual playful self? Lighten up. The Service Management Facility (SMF), introduced in Oracle Solaris 10 and extended in Oracle Solaris 11, provides the discipline those unruly services need. Here are two articles that will help get the most out of it.

Introducing the Basics of the Service Management Facility in Oracle Solaris 11

The SMF keeps track of the relationship between the services in your instance of Solaris. With this information, it can start services much more quickly at boot time, and it restart them automatically in the correct order if any of them fail. And that's only the beginning. In this article Glynn Foster explains what SMF does, and how to perform basic services administration with it, including how to use these four commands to get information about, and manage, your system services:

Command Description
svcadm Manage the state of service instances
svcs Provide information about services, including their status
svcprop Get information about service configuration properties
svccfg Import, export, and modify service configuration

Advanced Administration with the Service Management Facility in Oracle Solaris 11

In this article, Glynn Foster describes how to use some of the more advanced features of SMF, including service bundles, which you can use to deliver custom configuration across systems. And SMF profiles, which modify services to suit a particular installation. The introduction of layers in Oracle Solaris 11 provides better tracking of vendor-supplied customizations and administrative customizations for services and instances of services in four discrete layers, and site profiles, also described in this article, help you manage these layers more easily.

- Rick

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Thursday Jun 28, 2012

Similar But Not The Same

A few weeks ago we published an article that explained how to use Oracle Solaris Cluster 3.3 5/11 to provide a virtual, multitiered architecture for Oracle Real Application Cluster (Oracle RAC) 11.2.0.2. We called it ...

How to Deploy Oracle RAC on Zone Clusters

Welllllll ... we just published another article just like it. Except that it's different. The earlier article was for Oracle RAC 11.2.0.2. This one is for Oracle RAC 11.2.0.3. This one describes how to do the same thing as the earlier one --create an Oracle Solaris Zone cluster, install and configure Oracle Grid Infrastructure and Oracle RAC in the zone cluster, and create an Oracle Solaris Cluster resource for Oracle RAC-- but for version 11.2.0.3 of Oracle RAC. Even though the objective is the same, and the version is only a dot-dot-dot release away, the process is quite different. So we decided to call it:

How to Deploy Oracle RAC 11.2.0.3 on Zone Clusters

Hope you can keep the different versions clear in your head. If not, let me know, and I'll try to make them easier to distinguish.

- Rick

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Tuesday May 22, 2012

Cluster Fest

It's been a couple of months since we focused on Oracle Solaris Cluster. If you're a fan, we have some new content that will interest you. See below. (If you're new to Solaris Cluster, in particular how to use it in a virtual environment, see "Recent Technical Articles About Oracle Solaris Cluster," further down.)

New Technical Articles About Oracle Solaris Cluster

How to Upgrade to Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0
If you are running Oracle Solaris Cluster 3.3 5/11 on Oracle Solaris 10 and want to upgrade to Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0 running on Oracle Solaris 11, consider using the Oracle Solaris Cluster Geographic Edition software. It makes the job easier and keeps downtime to a minimum. Tim Read wrote this 8-part article to show you how. Contents are:

How to Deploy Oracle RAC on Zone Clusters
This one is very cool. Oracle Solaris Cluster lets you create clusters of Solaris zones. That gives you high availability. You also get high availability from Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC). So why would you install RAC on zone clusters? Because you can implement a multi-tiered database environment that isolates database tiers and administrative domains from each other, while taking advantage of centralized (and simpler) cluster administration. This article explains how to do it.

Recent Technical Resources About Oracle Solaris Cluster

Blog: How to Survive the End of the World - Part I
Provides a simple example of a two-node cluster, and provides resources to help you create one.

How to Survive the End of the World - Part II
Changes the 2-node example above into a failover cluster, and provides resources to help you create one.

As always you can find the latest technical resources to help you evaluate, test, and deploy Oracle Solaris Cluster on OTN's Cluster Resources for Sysadmins and Developers

- Rick

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Monday Jan 23, 2012

How to Survive the End of the World - Part II

In Part I of our Survival Guide for Civilization, I explained how to save civilization by identifying four distant planets that had the essential building blocks of civilization and combining them into a 5-node cluster with Earth:

Building BlockDistant Planet
--------------------------------------
footballDitka
cheerleadersDallas
beerBud
bratsMilwaukee
--------------------------------------
civilizationbackup civilization

As mentioned in Part I, the resulting five-node cluster was actually more than what we wanted. Five distant planets! We'd rather not deal with the overhead of managing five distant planets. We prefer to keep managing just one planet, but make sure that can keep civilization humming. Turns out that we can accomplish that through the magic of virtualization. As you might expect, it's called a virtual cluster. (Really techie people call it a failover zone cluster.)

First, we create one zone on Earth for each building block:

Building BlockZone on Earth
--------------------------------------
footballfootball-zone
cheerleaderscheerleader-zone
beerbeer-zone
bratsbrats-zone
--------------------------------------
civilizationcivilization zones

Then we create one failover zone on each distant planet for each zone on Earth:

Zone on EarthFailover ZoneDistant Planet
---------------------------------------------------------
football-zonefootball-failover-zoneDitka
cheerleaderscheerleaders-failover-zoneDallas
beerbeer-failover-zoneBud
bratsbrats-failover-zoneMilwaukee
---------------------------------------------------------
zone civilizationfailover zone civilization

In this way, each failover zone on its distant planet backs up one original zone on Earth. It's a great way to save civilization with much less overhead.

As it turns out, not only do we have an article that shows you how to create a cluster with Solaris Cluster 4.0, but we have one that shows you how to create a failover cluster, too:

How to Create A Failover Zone Cluster

Give it a try. It never hurts to be prepared.

- Rick
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Monday Jul 18, 2011

Women Soccer Players Don't Flop

I'm now a rabid fan of women's soccer. Men's soccer? Phht! Men flop. Really. They could recruit Vlade Divac straight out of the NBA without letting him even see what a soccer ball looks like, and he'd be a superstar before mid-season.

Sunday's match between Japan and the US was one of the best matches I've ever seen, in large part because the women played clean soccer. And because they exhibited none of the honor-sapping flopping that is prevalent in the men's game.

What's this got to do with Oracle Solaris Cluster? Think about it. You can hit the Japanese women with a veritable tsunami of shots on goal, you can overwhelm them with skill, speed, power, and intensity. You can jump over them, power through them, score debilitating goals on them. More than once. And you can run them into the ground for 120 minutes. But they never go down. They never give up. They keep fighting. And they keep coming at you.

Wouldn't you want that on your side?

We just released version 3.3 5/11. Here are some resources to help you become familiar with it.

Resources for Oracle Solaris Cluster 3.3

By the way, that picture is not from the USA-Japan match, but from nj.com.

- Rick
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Tuesday Mar 15, 2011

Long Title, Quick Start!

Linux RAC ClusterClustered applications are the keystone to highly available environments. Where you have clustering, you usually have databases – and where you have clustered databases, it is hard to avoid Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC).

Clustered databases aren't generally known for ease of setup. The Sun BluePrints Program was orginally created over ten years ago to focus on this topic specifically and numerous books and white papers were a mainstay. We once tried to write a book on this topic in six months and this was so complicated that it couldn't be done. However, technology has progressed and it is now much easier to create powerful solutions without all the pain-and-suffering.

As witnessed by Sridhar Ranganathan's and Jeffrey Wright's latest opus: Oracle9i Real Application Clusters Database Quick Start Install Guide for Sun ZFS Storage Appliance Using Oracle Linux. When we say "Quick Start," we mean it: long title, quick start! In the fewest pages possible they take you through everything you need, from downloading and installing the software, to setting up the disk, and creating the database itself.

No reason to shy away from clustering any longer.

- Kemer

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Contributors:
Rick Ramsey
Kemer Thomson
and members of the OTN community

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