Solving the Tape Storage Space Problem

Because I came of age professionally in the shorts-and-tshirt smarter-than-you culture of Silicon Valley, I always assumed tape storage was used only by retired British spies with names such as Baratheon and Brewster and Cameron who lived in dank mansions on the rocky coast of Scotland and still dressed in tweed jackets for dinner. They spent their days engrossed in the struggle to keep their Dunhill pipes lit and their hair piece in place against fury of the North Wind. Every few months a carrier pigeon would arrive from MI5, and Baratheon or Brewster or Cameron would slowly descend the stairs to a back room. A week later he would return with a name written in code, and hand it to a man in a dripping wetsuit and spear gun who would jump off the cliff without looking and swim it back to a submarine waiting off the coast.

Turns out I was behind the times. In fact, tape for archiving has several advantages that make it economically feasible in today's digital pack-rat economy. Such as durability. And much, much lower power consumption. You can read about them in this paper by Horison information strategies:

Tape: The Digital Curator of the Information Age (registration required)

If you're a storage admin or IT manager considering tape, there's another paper that may interest you more. Published on OTN in July, it describes very clearly the limitations of data that is written in a stream to tape, and how Oracle technologies overcome them. For instance, once you write a block of data to a stream of tape, that particular bit of data not only becomes inefficient to target for access, but updates to the data become clumsy and cumbersome. And as tape cartridges grow to store a terabyte of data, the problem becomes even more pronounced.

Oracle's StorageTek In-Drive Reclaim Accelerator avoids this problem by simply breaking up the serial data on a tape into smaller, more manageable chunks that are grouped together and managed as logical volumes. Find out how in this well-written white paper:

How it Works: StorageTek Reclaim Accelerator

For more information about Oracle tape drive products, visit OTN's Tape Storage product page.

- Rick
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Contributors:
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Kemer Thomson
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