Wednesday Aug 27, 2014

Brendan Gregg's Quick Reference Page for Linux Performance

You may know about Brendan Gregg because of his contributions to DTrace and other Oracle Solaris technologies. Here are two resources to refresh your memory.

Recently, Brendan turned his high-performance spectacles on Linux:

Linux Performance Quick Reference

In his own words, "This page links to various Linux performance material I've created, including the tools maps on the right, which show: Linux observability tools, Linux benchmarking tools, Linux tuning tools, and Linux observability sar. For more diagrams, see my slide decks below."

His diagram reminds me of Edward Tufte's work on elegant visual explanations. Give it a read, bookmark it, and show your friends. While you're at it, be sure to take a look at OTN's resources for Oracle Linux.

About the Photograph

I took a picture of that cove from somewhere in Highway 1 on the California Coast on my ride back from the Sun Reunion.

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Monday Aug 18, 2014

Why Wouldn't Root Be Able to Change a Zone's IP Address in Oracle Solaris 11?





You might assume that if you have root access to an Oracle Solaris zone, you'd be able to change the root's IP address. If so, you'd proceed along these lines ...


  1. First, you'd log in:
  2. root@global_zone:~# zlogin user-zone
  3. Then you'd remove the IP interface:
  4. root@user-zone:~# ipadm delete-ip vnic0
  5. Next, you'd create a new IP interface:
  6. root@user-zone:~# ipadm create-ip vnic0
  7. Then you'd assign the IP interface a new IP address (10.0.0.10):
  8. root@user-zone:~# ipadm create-addr -a local=10.0.0.10/24 vnic0/v4
    ipadm: cannot create address: Permission denied




Why would that happen? Here are some potential reasons:

  • You're in the wrong zone
  • Nobody bothered to tell you that you were fired last week.
  • The sysadmin for the global zone (probably your ex-girlfriend) enabled link protection mode on the zone with this sweet little command:
  • root@global_zone:~# dladm set-linkprop -p \ protection=mac-nospoof,restricted,ip-nospoof vnic0

How'd your ex-girlfriend learn to do that? By reading this article:

Securing a Cloud-Based Data Center with Oracle Solaris 11

by Orgad Kimchi, Ron Larson, and Richard Friedman

When you build a private cloud, you need to protect sensitive data not only while it's in storage, but also during transmission between servers and clients, and when it's being used by an application. When a project is completed, the cloud must securely delete sensitive data and make sure the original data is kept secure. These are just some of the many security precautions a sysadmin needs to take to secure data in a cloud infrastructure. Orgad, Ron, and Richard explain the rest and show you how to employ the security features in Oracle Solaris 11 to protect your cloud infrastructure. Part 2 of a three-part article on cloud deployments that use the Oracle Solaris Remote Lab as a case study.

About the Photograph

That's the fence separating a small group of tourist cabins from a pasture in the small town of Tropic, Utah.

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Kemer Thomson
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