Monday Mar 24, 2014

Four High Performance Configurations for SuperCluster and SPARC Servers

When a surfing buddy of mine asked me to look at a banking application that runs on Solaris, I thought he'd been hit on the head by his board one too many times. Solaris is cool. Banking is not. But I looked into it, anyway, and to my surprise, I found the banking app had a certain amount of geek appeal.

If geek appeal is not enough to hold your interest, Mister Hair-on-Fire, the other reason for talking about this banking application is that it helped identify four high performance configurations for Oracle's SuperCluster and SPARC servers that might be useful for other types of applications. So keep reading. Or ...

Go directly to white paper (pdf) that describes the configurations.

What first caught my interest was the idea of a bank operating system. A traditional computer OS manages hardware devices and provides services for application software. A bank headquarters does something very similar. It manages the branches (hardware) and provides services for its operations (applications). Turns out, that's the idea behind Finacle's Core Banking Solution.

Core banking sounds dull as hell, but it's a big deal for banks. It replaces cumbersome end-of-day consolidation between branch banks and HQ. (I almost feel asleep just writing that.) In fact, centralized banks worldwide now mandate the implementation of core banking technology to prevent fraud and meet regulatory requirements.

As a result, Finacle's Core Banking Solution is designed as configurable modules with layered Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), straight-through processing (STP) capabilities, web-enabled technology, and support for 24 x 7 operations.

But no matter how sophisticated the application, the underlying architecture can limit its performance. Not a problem! Since Finacle 10 is now available on Oracle Solaris, it can be run on the screaming fast Oracle SuperCluster or Oracle’s SPARC T-Series servers. As you might expect, Finacle tested this combination for both batch and OLTP processing and found:

  • Batch results that processed 15% more accounts and 3.2 to 3.7 times the required minimum records per second, all achieved within one third of the specified time, with plenty of CPU resources available to handle further load.
  • OLTP results that exceeded Finacle acceptance criteria with more users and more transactions per second, all with sub-second response times and with considerable CPU resources remaining available.

White Paper: Infosys Finacle Core Banking Solution on Oracle SuperCluster and Oracle’s SPARC T-Series Servers

Roger Bitar provides technical details about the software and hardware layers in this solution, and describes the configurations that obtained the best performance:

  • Configuration for Fastest OLTP Processing on SuperCluster T4-4
  • Configuration for Fastest Batch Processing on SuperCluster T4-4
  • Configuration for Fastest OLTP Processing on SPARC T4-4 Server
  • Configuration for Fastest Batch Processing on SPARC T4-4 Server

About the Photograph

I took this picture of bike race taken in Durango, Colorado, in the Fall of 2012.

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube

Tuesday Nov 12, 2013

The Jack LaLanne School of System Administration

Two of my childhood heroes were Tarzan and Jack LaLanne. Tarzan was an obvious choice: what boy wouldn't want to spend his days bungee jumping through the jungle with his own pack of gorillas? Jack Lalanne had a disturbing habit of wearing stretch pants, but he was so damn fit for an old guy that you couldn't help but be impressed. Especially back then, when nobody knew what a dumb bell was, much less Cross-Fit. Here's what he did to celebrate his 70th birthday.

Sooner or later we all face a choice in our careers: surrender to the life of a has-been like Bruce Sprinsteen's baseball player or become an unstoppable sysadmin like Jack Lalanne. If you'd rather keep on fighting like Jack, give these resources a look. Brian Bream's blog provides specific suggestions for keeping your skills up to date. The video interviews describe the types of technologies that are challenging what you used to know.

Blog: The Old School Sysadmin - A Dying Breed?

by Brian Bream

"The sysadmin role has been far too dependent on performing repetitive tasks and working in a reactionary mode ... the sysadmin must grow a much larger skill set to be successful. Don’t grow vertically in one technology, grow horizontally amongst many technologies." Just one of the suggestions Brian Bream provides in this excellent blog post.

Video: Freeing the Sysadmin From Repetitive Tasks

Interview with Marshall Choy

Marshall Choy, Director of Optimized Solutions at Oracle was once a sysadmin. And a Solaris engineer. He explains what optimized solutions are, how they are developed and tested, how they handle patching, and how these vertically integrated systems impact the job and duties of a sysadmin.

Video: The Oracle Database Appliance

Interview with Bob Thome

Bob Thome, Senior Director of Product Management, explains what makes the Database Appliance simple, reliable, and affordable, and how it could change the economies and processes of the data center.

Video: Why Pinellas County Chose Oracle Exalytics

Interview with Gautham

Gautham (pronounced like Batman's Gotham) recently led an effort to refresh the Pinellas County hardware systems. He'll explain what they were looking for, why they chose Oracle Exalytics, how they became convinced it was the right decision, and how it changed the way they managed their data center.

Video: DTrace for System Administrators

Interview with Brendan Gregg

This video interview will give you an idea of some of the value-add tasks you can perform when you are freed from the reactive mode that Brian Bream describes in his blog. Brendan Gregg describes the best ways for sysadmins to tune deployed applications to get more performance out of them in their particular computing environment

photograph of Ford Mustang GT 500 taken at Gateway Museum copyright by Rick Ramsey

-Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Personal Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Saturday Oct 05, 2013

Elasticity: The Biggest Challenge Facing Today's Data Center

Biggest Challenge Facing Data Centers Today

Interview with Brian Bream, Collier IT

Provisioning used to be a hardware activity. It involved heavy lifting. Today, thanks to Oracle's engineered systems, a data center can pre-configure itself to make provisioning a software activity. According to Brian Bream, CTO of Collier IT, instead of pulling a server off the shelf, installing an OS, and applications, then patching and configuring, it's a matter of bringing up the management tool, selecting the image, and hitting Bang! In Brian's experience, elasticity is the biggest challenge facing data centers today, and Oracle engineered systems are a great way to deal with it.

In addition to being Collier IT's Chief Technology Officer, Brian was named instructor of the year not once, but twice, by Oracle University. Get his opinion about the impact of training on the careers of sysadmins.

Related Resources

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Personal Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Monday Jul 29, 2013

How to Bend Bare Metal to Your Will

photo copyright 2013 by Rick Ramsey

The fins on this 1957 DeSoto were shaped during a time when Americans weren't afraid of offending anyone with their opinions, right or wrong. We have, perhaps, grown a little more introspective, a little more considerate, but our cars have paid the price. They all look alike. Their edges have been worn away by focus groups. They have no personality. They cringe at the sight of their own shadows.

I weep for my adopted country.

Well, if you like classic American cars as much as I do, you may on occasion feel the need to bend bare metal to your will. Here's your chance.

Tech Article: How to Get Best Performance From the ZFS Storage Appliance

Disk storage. Clustering. CPU and L1/L2 caching size. Networking. And file systems. Just some of the components of Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance that you can shape for optimum performance. Anderson Souza shows you how. Go ahead. Give your appliance a pair of tail fins. (Link is in the title.)

Psst:
You can see more unique cars from the Golden Age of American Automobile at the Gateway Automobile Museum. If you can't get to the border between Utah and Colorado to appreciate them in person, like I was fortunate enough to do, you can enjoy them through your browser at http://www.gatewayautomuseum.com/cars-and-galleries/.

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Wednesday May 22, 2013

Just Add Water

When it comes to web browsing, I have little patience with amateurish sites and won’t hesitate to point out problems and flaws to the webmaster—if I can find a link to them, that is. Have you ever had this experience: you are on a web site trying to buy something and it is so slow and unresponsive that you decide to forget it: it isn’t worth the trouble or you just don’t have time? Chalk that up as one lost sale! This is—or at least should be—the web team’s nightmare.

Sure, the Web is the ultimate source of free information. But, ultimately something needs to pay the bills. Since the Web has become the universal marketplace, you would think every business would want to maximize their return by optimizing their web commerce infrastructure…

Do you remember Sea Monkeys? Just add water and soon you would have your own little amusing zoo. “Sea Monkeys” (actually dried brine shrimp) have been around since I was a kid. Advertisements were a staple of comic books. I see their purveyor, Transcience Corporation, is still in existence and taking orders!

Where is this leading? I would like to think of Oracle ATG Web Commerce as the sea monkeys of web commerce: just add Oracle’s SPARC SuperCluster. “Sure,” you are thinking to yourself, “he is paid to say that.” I can’t deny that, but my entire career in the computer industry has swirled around the dream of reusable components. We now have them: software and hardware. My enthusiasm is both justified and sincere.

A proof is in one of the best articles to cross my screen in some time: “How to Optimize Your Web Commerce Infrastructure By Tuning Oracle ATG Web Commerce Applications on SPARC SuperCluster”. This dissertation is surprisingly compact for the amount of information behind it. As the authors put it:

The objective of deploying an internet storefront or what is commonly called an e-commerce Website is to produce revenue through product offerings and subsequent purchases at the Website while at the same time “learning” about customers and their preferences. Ultimately, the goal is to make it easy for customers to research and purchase items on the site while encouraging customers to purchase related products and services. … Delivering a positive user experience also requires fast response time.

The article discussed the architecture used for testing. To get there, they had to figure out what an optimal test workload would look like and then how to simulate it. They then ask the really important question, “can this workload scale on a bigger system?”

In this study the authors developed a number of best practices, tweaks to make things run better, which they share:

  • Configuring Oracle SPARC SuperCluster with Oracle VM Server for SPARC
  • Setting Up the Oracle WebLogic Server Zone
  • Setting Up the Oracle ATG Web Commerce Zone
  • Modifying the General Purpose Domain
  • Modifying the Oracle ATG Web Commerce Environment
  • Modifying the Oracle WebLogic Server Environment
  • Modifying the Database Server

For example, because the Web server will generate a lot of concurrent processes, all accessing the database, you will want increase these in the database configuration. If you think about it, this is a meager list of tweaks for such a complex system.

Response time metrics as Oracle ATG Web Commerce workload was incrementally increased
Response time metrics as Oracle ATG Web Commerce workload was incrementally increased

This article is a great read. At the very least, it gives you an approach and methodology to testing. More importantly, it demonstrates how easy it is to create a stable and scalable solution today. Just add water.

—Kemer

Follow us on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube

Wednesday May 08, 2013

Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk?

The year is 1971. Apollo 14 lands on the Moon. The Ed Sullivan Show airs its final episode. IBM invents the 8-inch floppy disk. The first e-mail is sent. Dirty Harry utters his most famous line: '...you've got to ask yourself one question: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk?' (image removed from blog)

Back then, we built from the ground-up because there was no other way. There are those who still think that is the way to build integrated systems.

What would it take to persuade you to build from pre-tested components? You are probably thinking, “But, I already do that!” No, I mean really big and meaningful components, the type that are going to cost money. Real money. It’s at that point when many a red-blooded engineer thinks, “I’ll bet that I can do it cheaper.” Trust me, you can’t.

You would think that the days of building the service infrastructures from the ground, up were long gone. But, there are plenty of excuses: “I need everything to work exactly my way, and nothing out there can do it…,” or “But, I could save a ton of money if I built a home-brew using free open source and distributed it across a bunch of white boxes…” I know: it is so tempting, because it is such an interesting challenge and you don’t have to wrestle with the Suits to get the budget. But, when the numbers get big, too much is at risk.

The Industry has been moving in the direction of creating bigger components. Oracle’s decision to buy Sun was largely because we wanted to add hardware components to our mix. And, indeed we have: consider products like Oracle Exadata Database Machine and Oracle’s SPARC SuperCluster. Big. Powerful. Expensive. Face it: big problems need big solutions.

Our engineers recently tested how well this approach worked by simulating a large communications service provider. Is a simulation of 20-million GSM customers big enough? Step back for a second and consider just how much a glitch anywhere in such a system would ruin your day, if not your career.

Building Consolidation Efficiency into Operations Support Systems is a quick read aimed at you, and not the Suits. I think you will find several things of interest here. First of all, no matter how you plan to build your solution, you will want to test it first. Take a look and see how we approached the problem.

Benchmark Configuration
Benchmark Configuration

Secondly, we show how we would actually deploy such a solution. I think you might be surprised at how compact the solution can be. Back in 1971 (long before cell phones, of course!) you would build a datacenter that would fill an entire office building. Today, you can fit it into a rack:

Sample Deployment Configuration
Sample Deployment Configuration

Still think you can do it yourself? Well, do ya, punk?

—Kemer

Tuesday Feb 26, 2013

Performance Tuning an Exalogic System

source

I tend to get annoyed at my engineering pals for designing performance into automobiles such as the Chevy Corvette, instead of letting the driver feel the satisfaction of increasing performance by improving his or her technique. Many sysadmins feel the same about their craft. But as the story of Paul Bunyan demonstrates, we must adapt or die.

In a previous post I discussed how Exalogic changes the way you handle provisioning. In this post, I'll focus on the way Exalogic changes the way you handle performance tuning. First, the optimizations that are already done for you, then the optimizations you can still perform yourself.

Performance Optimizations Designed Into Exalogic

Because Oracle engineering knows the exact details of the environment in which each component is operating, Oracle has configured Exalogic components to use the internal network, memory, and storage for optimum performance, availability and security. It employs two types of optimizations:

Generic Optimizations (Exabus)

These optimizations will benefit any software running on the Exalogic machine, whether Oracle or 3rd party, in physical or virtual environments. The collection of Exalogic–specific optimizations are referred to as Exabus. The purpose of Exabus is primarily to integrate Infiniband networking seamlessly into all the hardware, software, and firmware distributed throughout the system. Examples include:

  • Changes to the firmware and drivers in the network switches that increase performance by skipping protocol stack conversions
  • Use of Exalogic solid state disk caching to increase the speed and capacity of local (shared) data read and write operations, such as JMS queues and run time metadata.
  • Built in high availability at network and storage levels
  • Native Infiniband integration with any other engineered systems, such as additional Exalogic machines, ZFS storage appliances, or Exadata Database machines.
  • The ability to define Infiniband partitions, which ensure application isolation and security.

Optimizations to Run-Time Components

Oracle has engineered optimizations for Exalogic directly into Oracle WebLogic Server (WLS), Coherence, and Tuxedo. They benefit any application running on those software components, but they can only be activated on the Exalogic platform. They address performance limitations that only become apparent when the software is running on Exalogic's high-density computing nodes and very fast Infiniband switches. Examples include:

  • WebLogic Server session replication uses the SDP layer of IB networking to maximize performance of large scale data operations. This avoids some of the typical TCP/IP network processing overhead.
  • Cluster communication has been redesigned in Coherence to further minimize network latency when processing data sets across caches. Its elastic data feature increases performance by minimizing network and memory use in both RAM and garbage collection processing.
  • Tuxedo has been similarly enhanced to make increasing use of SDP and RDMA protocols in order to optimize the performance of inter–process communications within and between compute nodes.

Tuning You Can Perform on Exalogic

Benchmarks and other tests show that applications that run well on Oracle middleware will run better on Exalogic. The degree to which they run better will be affected by how well optimised they are to take advantage of the Exalogic system, as well how well the Exalogic components are set up to balance resources.

However, if your workloads or configurations change, you may need to tune your Exalogic. Here are some general notes, extracted from the Exalogic: Administration Tasks and Tools white paper.

Tuning the Middleware

At the middleware and application level most of the standard options and techniques are available to you. WebLogic Server, JRockit, Coherence and iAS, etc. operate as they do on traditional platforms.

As for the rest of the Exalogic platform, Oracle's recommendation is: leave it alone.

Tuning The Platform

Exalogic manages itself, so you don't need adjust it unless you are sure that something needs changing. This is a major change in approach, since you are used to spending considerable time tweaking your systems to accommodate the needs of different groups. Knowing exactly when and how much (or how little) to tune an Exalogic system is a big topic, but here are some general guidelines.

  • Because Exalogic has such a high density of compute resources across such a fast network, small configuration changes can have a large impact.
  • Try out your changes in a test environment, first. Make sure its resources, configurations, and workload match those of your production system as closely as possible. Oracle Application Replay is a good tool for assessing the impact of configuration and infrastructure changes on the performance of your applications. Give it a try.
  • Focus on reducing response times for users and applications. If response time is not a problem, you probably don't have an issue to resolve, regardless of internal alerts and indicators you may be noticing.
  • Capture the right performance baselines ahead of time so you can compare the results of your tuning to them.

Tuning the Infrastructure

Storage, Infiniband, and OS are set up during initial configuration, so further tuning is not usually needed. If you need to review the kernel settings, network bonding, and MTU values, or perhaps the NFS settings, use Enterprise Manager. Finding the optimum changes tends to be an iterative process that varies with application workload.

Tuning the Middleware Runtime Environment

Ensure that Exalogic optimizations for WLS Suite are switched on (see MOS note 1373571.1), since they affect replication channels, packet sizes, and the use of the SDP protocol in the Infiniband networks.

Oracle Traffic Director is currently a unique feature of Exalogic, so is not available on other platforms. You can alter traffic routing rules for each application at any time. As workloads change and grow this is likely to be a key tuning task.

Tuning the Applications

At present you can tune business applications just as you would on traditional platforms. One possible side effect of running your business applications on Exalogic is that its enhanced performance may unmask poorly tuned applications or poorly written customizations.

For More Information

For more information, read the Exalogic: Administration Tasks and Tools white paper.

- Rick

Follow me on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | The Great Peruvian Novel

Tuesday Feb 19, 2013

Provisioning Oracle Exalogic: What's Involved

source

In this interview from 2012, Marshall Choy explains to dear old Justin how Oracle's engineered systems and optimized solutions will impact the job of a sysadmin.

I was just reading a recently published Oracle White Paper that goes into a little more detail...

"While the core middleware or applications administration role is largely the same as for non-Exalogic environments, significantly less work is required to manage storage, OS, and networks. In addition, some administration tasks are simplified."

That sounded interesting, so I kept reading. Here is an excerpt of what it says about provisioning.

Provisioning New Environments

Provisioning is done so frequently in some organizations that it's almost a continuous effort. Exalogic was designed as a multi-tenant environment in which many applications and user communities can operate in secure isolation, but all running on a shared compute infrastructure. As a result, provisioning environments for development, testing or other projects is simply a case of re-configuring these existing shared resources. And it takes hours rather than weeks.

The typical steps involved are:

  1. Storage – using the ZFS BUI
    1. Create NFS v4 shares
    2. Define Access Control List
  2. Compute nodes – via standard OS commands
    1. Decide which nodes are to be used for this project. In the current Exalogic X3-2 machines each node has 16 processing cores and 256 GB RAM. For each node:
      1. Create the root OS user, if it does not already exist.
      2. Add a mount point entry for the shared storage to the /etc/fstab file and issue the mount command to enable access to it from the compute node.
  3. Network – using the Exalogic IB subnet manager
    1. Identify IP addresses for the compute nodes to be used. Add any new virtual IP addresses to be used to ensure middleware high availability.
    2. Define new virtual network interfaces (VNICs) to enable connections to Exalogic from the rest of the data Center.
    3. Associate the pre-set external facing IP addresses to the VNICs.
    4. Define Exalogic Infiniband partitions to create secure groups of compute nodes / processors.

No physical cabling is required as network configuration is defined at the software level. In the event of a major failure, however, you may need to re-image the OS on some or even all compute nodes as a faster alternative to restoring from backup.

This whole process should take no more than an hour, after which a new, fully functioning compute platform is available for the project. It does not require any other data Center resources.

Further details are available in the Exalogic Enterprise Deployment Guide

I'll keep reading it and sharing some nuggets here. See the entire paper.

- Rick

Follow us on:
Blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube

(psst! and don't forget to follow the Great Peruvian Novel!)

Friday Mar 09, 2012

My Personal Crib Sheet for the ZFS Storage Appliance

Question: What do the F22 Raptor and the ZFS Storage Appliance have in common?

Answer: They bend time. They compress distance. And they both come with their own simulator.

We recently published some articles about really cool ways to use the ZFS Storage Appliance (see below), so I spent a little time looking into the darned thing. It's easy to find out what the ZFS Storage Appliance does, but more difficult to find out what its components are. What can I yank out and replace? What can I connect it to? And what buttons and levers can I push? Or pull.

So I put together this crib sheet. If you didn't grow up in The Bronx, see wikipedia's definition of crib sheet.

What Have We Published Recently?

What the Heck Is It?

It is Oracle's main NAS system for enterprise environments. In case you don't already know, NAS (Network Attached Storage) is simply a storage system designed to be shared by several servers on a network. Instead of each server having its own storage, which would make sharing files wicked slow, you put all your storage on your NAS system, and let all the servers access it fast. Plus, it's much easier to manage. Shoot, you can even store your boot environments on your NAS system so that if one of your servers dumps core, you can reboot it from the NAS system.

It comes in three variations:

  • 7120 - for small and medium size installations - 3.3 TB to 177 TB raw capacity
  • 7320 - mid-range storage for the enterprise - cluster option - up to 288 TB raw capacity - Hybrid Storage Pools with up to 4 TB of optimized cache
  • 7420 - For virtualized environments requiring multiple data services and heterogeneous file sharing - single or cluster - up to 1.7 PB of raw capacity

What Makes It Special?

  • It's wicked fast (see F22 Raptor, above).
  • It's got management software that makes it easy to administer.
  • Its Hybrid Storage Pool Design recognizes I/O patterns and places data in the storage media that will provide best performance for that data, whether DRAM, flash, or disk.
  • Hybrid Columnar Compression reduces storage footprints for NAS-based databases from three to five times.
  • DTrace analytics help you diagnose performance and networking bottlenecks
  • Fault Management Architecure (FMA) identifies faults and automatically re-routes traffic around them.
  • When you need more capacity, you can add:
    • DRAM, cache, or I/O ports for more resources
    • Disk shelf units for greater total capacity
    • Flash drives for faster performance.
  • You can get it in a dual-cluster configuration for high availability.
  • It provides a variety of RAID protections to balance capacity, protection, and performance requirements of your applications.
  • It's waaaaay cheaper than an F22 and doesn't require all that cryptic back and forth with those moody Air Traffic Control people.

Details here.

What's In The Box?

When I asked, I got the usual "Well, I could tell you what's in the box, but then I'd have to shoot you." Turns out they don't want me messing with it. Or you messing with it. The darn thing is built from off-the-shelf components, but the value-add comes from the way they're tuned to work together. So if you, Mister Curiosity, decide to pop open a terminal and run ssh into Solaris, you'll see a message notifying you that if you continue with your wayward ways you'll void your warranty. Ack! Like the good ol' boys from the Georgia Satellites like to put it...

She said, "No huggee, no kissee
Until you make me a wife."
Oh, my honey, my baby
Don't put my love upon no shelf
She said, "Don't hand me no lines
And keep your hands to yourself."

Here's what you really need to know: It's a specialized server with a processor, memory, and disk drives. Loaded with a highly tuned version of Oracle Solaris and other software goodies. But don't think of it that way. Think of it as remote storage. That's all. A box with:

  • Two types of storage:
    1. Filesystem, such as CIFS, NFS, ZFS, etc.
    2. Block, allocated as a Logical Unit (LUN)
  • Connections for a wide variety of network protocols
  • Two sysadmin toolkits:
    1. BUI (boo! boo!)
    2. CLI (yay! yay!)
  • Analytics to help you monitor its performance.

Connections? What Can I Connect It To?

For starters, you can connect it to the other servers on the network, through the stock Infiniband HCA's. That's part of what makes it wicked fast. But you can also connect it to other devices through industry-standard network protocols, including:

  • Infiniband
  • Fibre Channel
  • NFS
  • Common Internet File System (CIFS)
  • Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI)
  • NDMP (Network Data management Protocol so it can participate in remotely-coordinated automatic backups
  • A Virus Scan Service
  • NIS naming, LDAP directory, and Microsoft Active Directory services for centralized management of users, groups, hostnames, etc.

What Administration Tasks Does It Require?

Details vary by model and your needs, but basic administration consists of:

  • Defining the storage allocated to each server
  • Making it available to the servers (sharing)
  • Migrating data
  • Integrating it with other applications
  • Taking snapshots
  • Monitoring performance with DTrace Analytics
  • The usual backups, diagnostics, and housecleaning tasks for any server or storage system

Any Examples of What To Use It For?

Turns out you can do lots of cool things with the ZFS Storage Appliance. A partial listing:

For More Information

The Best American Country Song of All Time?

Is it the best? That's debatable. But it's certainly one of my favorite renditions of a country song, from one of my favorite movies of all time.

- Rick Ramsey (with special thanks to Andrew Ness)

Website

Newsletter

Facebook

Twitter

Tuesday Jan 10, 2012

Big Data is Cool

Do you like to screw around with Facebook's ad machinery by posting creative entries just to see what ads Facebook will post immediately afterwards? Try it sometime ... post an entry with "Alzheimers" or "lactose intolerance" in it and watch how the ads change. Beats late-nite television.

We take it for granted, now, but advertisements used to really miss their mark. I will read anything about motorcycles, but I'm bored to tears by Tommy Hilfiger's latest twist on torn jeans. Back in the day, retailers knew precious little about their customers, so Tommy would waste a lot of money sending me pictures of skinny teenagers in torn jeans. That's all changed. In today's living out loud society, Harley Davidson knows more about me than the FBI, CIA, and Homeland Security combined.

That's because of Big Data. Instead of storing only transactions in relational databases, companies are now storing and mining the content in blogs, social media, photographs, and all kinds of non-traditional data to find out who their customers are likely to be, and what they're likely to want. In principle it sounds kinda creepy, but in practice it keeps Tommy Hilfiger outta my face, so I don't mind.

If you're a sysadmin, you may want to know Big Data works. Since Oracle just launched its Big Data Appliance, we have plenty of content to get you started. Here are three:

You can find these and more content about Oracle's BigData Appliance on OTN:

OTN's Big Data Appliance Page

White papers, blogs, videos,
data sheets, and links to
related technologies.

- Rick
Website
Newsletter
Facebook
Twitter

About

Contributors:
Rick Ramsey
Kemer Thomson
and members of the OTN community

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
13
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today
Blogs We Like