Friday Mar 21, 2014

Oracle Open World 2014 Call for Proposals is Now Open!

Every Oracle Database Appliance customer has a great story to tell. Share yours! 

If you're an Oracle technology expert, conference attendees want to hear it straight from you. So don't wait and submit your proposal today. 

Proposals must be submitted by April 15.

Conference location: San Francisco, California, USA
Dates: Sunday, September 28 to Thursday, October 2, 2014
Website: Oracle OpenWorld (http://www.oracle.com/openworld/index.html)
Key 2014 Dates
Call for Proposals—Open Tuesday, March 18
Call for Proposals—Closed Tuesday, April 15, 11:59 p.m. PDT

Final notifications for accepted and declined submissions sent Mid-June

Visit http://www.oracle.com/openworld/call-for-papers/index.html today! 

Wednesday Feb 26, 2014

Oracle Appliance Manager Version 2.9 (OAK 2.9)

Oracle Appliance Manager patch bundle 2.9 (OAK 2.9) was released on February 18th, 2014 and is available for download as patch 17630388.

As always there are features, enhancements, and some bug fixes included with this release.


Some notable enhancements are as follows:

1  Import of http based templates directly on Oracle Database Appliance
2. Send Key support to user VMs via xenstore to facilitate configuration of user VMs from Oracle Appliance Manager
3. Shared storage (JBODs) monitoring on X3-2 and X4-2 systems using OAKCLI
4. Out-of-place update of Grid Infrastructure from 11.2.0.3.x to 11.2.0.4.0
5. Oracle Database Patch Set Update (PSU) 11.2.0.4.1 and 11.2.0.3.9 available
6. Improved VM stack - better module level logging (TINT ID), better exception handling in oakd 
7. Mutithreading of XML rpc agent and oakd adapter to allow parallel VM commands

Refer to Oracle Database Appliance Getting Started Guide for more information about these features and enhancements.

Tuesday Feb 04, 2014

Now deploy complete multi-tier application stacks on Oracle Database Appliance!

The Solution-in-a-box: Best practices for deploying JD Edwards EnterpriseOne on Oracle Database Appliance white paper is now published. A first in a series of "solution-in-a-box" white papers! The white paper is available at  http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/database-appliance/oda-jde-soln-in-a-box-technical-2120907.pdf

This white paper illustrates the process of deploying a complete multi-tier application architecture stack on the Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform. This includes deployment of the database, application and web tiers on a single Oracle Database Appliance system. The operation and management of the entire stack is facilitated by Oracle Appliance Manager command-line interface (oakcli). Take advantage of virtualization with extreme simplicity.

This vertical integration of technology stacks on Oracle Database Appliance is a very substantial, powerful capability that produces a quantum jump in the already strong value proposition of Oracle Database Appliance. Imagine the consolidation factor you can achieve by implementing the solution-in-a-box model for your applications!

Beat that!

Friday Jan 24, 2014

Why Virtualized Platform is the best deployment option for Oracle Database Appliance

Recently a user asked, what are the considerations for using the Virtualized Platform configuration or the Bare Metals configuration on Oracle Database Appliance? Certainly, the Virtualized Platform configuration seems to provide everything that the Bare Metals configuration does plus more.

Listed below are some of the considerations for why you may want to prefer to use the Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform option.

1. A single hardware environment for deploying both database and applications

2. Database runs in a Virtual Machine (ODA_BASE) with direct access to storage (for native performance)

3. Control licensed CPUs by configuring ODA_BASE domain with the required number of CPU cores (and memory)

4. CPU cores (and memory) not assigned to the ODA_BASE domain are not wasted and are available for use by other, non-database Virtual Machiness

5. Oracle provided pre-configured VM application templates enable rapid deployment for both the database and applications

7. Use VLAN to provide separate networks to different Virtual Machines

8. Use shared repository to grow storage for VM repository

9. No VM expertise needed; Oracle Appliance Manager (oakcli) makes it easy to setup and manage the virtualized environment

Thursday Jan 23, 2014

BI-In-A-Box Webcast Replay

In case you were unable to join us today for the Oracle BI-in-a-Box webcast, the replay can be found here.

https://oraclemeetings.webex.com/oraclemeetings/lsr.php?RCID=42bdeb404681e17ea68aa4a3fd61ed1e

We look forward to your feedback!

Thanks. 

Wednesday Jan 22, 2014

BI Solution-in-a-Box -- Enterprise Class BI for the Mid Market

Attend the Webinar on January 23rd @ 12 noon ET, 9:00 am PT 

Tammy Bednar, Will Hutchinson, Rob Klaassens, and Mike Mrazek,  Oracle Corp.

 

Since the Oracle Database Appliance (ODA) started supporting Oracle Virtual Machine (OVM) twelve months ago, we have seen several groups develop purpose built offerings on top of it, called “Solutions in a Box,” where they combine an application or middleware on top of the robust, cost effective ODA platform. The newest member of this family combines enterprise class business intelligence, data integration and Oracle’s enterprise class database at a price mid market organizations can afford. In our prior post, we described the need IT industry analysts see for mid market organizations adopting business intelligence. In this post, we will talk about how Oracle addresses this need.

To address this need, Oracle has developed the BI Solution-in-a-Box. It contains the Oracle database with partitioning, diagnostics, and tuning, BI Foundation Suite, and Oracle Database Integrator, all running in two virtual machines on the Oracle Database Appliance. It is packaged to let customers license only the cores they need, expand as they grow, and be easy to buy and support, all supported by a single vendor. Because it is based on standard Oracle products, one can add other hardware, database or BI products if desired, like more storage, RAC, Advanced Analytics or an Oracle BI Application.

By providing enterprise class BI in a pre integrated package, Oracle has brought enterprise class functionality to the mid market. Enterprise class organizations, no matter what size, recognize that they stay enterprise class by adopting solutions that minimize their total cost of ownership. By pre integrating the hardware, firmware, operating system, virtualization, database, ETL, and BI, Oracle has provided a package that minimizes the total cost of ownership by eliminating integration challenges and minimizing the effort needed to stand up a business intelligence system. In addition, the tools themselves are regarded as having industry leading total costs of ownership. All these advantages help midsize organizations increase their agility while minimizing their labor costs. Labor costs, according to Gartner, are at least 75% of the total cost of ownership of a business intelligence system.

In addition, to make this solution easier to buy, Oracle has pre arranged financing through Oracle Finance Division to make the purchase either a loan or a lease depending on whether customers would prefer to treat the expenditure as a capital expense or an operating expense.

Oracle will be introducing and discussing the Oracle Database Appliance and BI Solution in a Box on a Webinar on January 23rd. For more information and to register for the event, please register to attend the event:

http://www.oracle.com/us/dm/245722-nafs13054094mpp037-se-2052054.html

Friday Jan 17, 2014

BI for the Mid Market

Tammy Bednar, Will Hutchinson, Rob Klaassens, and Mike Mrazek, Oracle Corp.

Oracle and industry analysts have seen a rapid expansion of business intelligence and data warehouse solutions into midsize and smaller organizations.  The need to understand how they are serving their customers, how their suppliers are serving them and the opportunity to drive growth and cost reductions requires insights into data. ERP, Performance Management systems and CRM/CX systems are great way to collect data but do not provide and easy and flexible way to combine data from multiple sources for in depth analysis.

Traditionally, midsize and smaller organizations have relied on spreadsheets or downloads of data to a personal database to meet these needs. However these solutions do not scale and suffer from problems of inconsistent data, errors, manual work and non-repeatable processes for gathering and analyzing data, leading to the inability to respond quickly. In the past, these organizations have not invested in business intelligence because the perception was that a Business Intelligence or Data Warehouse Strategy was too expensive to install and maintain. One would have to buy and configure hardware, a database, BI and ETL tools, and other middleware. The time, effort and cost to support these types of solutions would typically overwhelm most midsize IT staffs. Also, deploying these systems can cost several hundred thousand dollars over five years, after taking into account both out of pocket costs and the time the staff spends on BI, time which if it were available could effectively be spent elsewhere.

Register today to attend and learn how you can replace those Excel spreadsheets and Access databases with the type of analytics big companies have, analytics you thought you could never afford.

http://www.oracle.com/us/dm/245722-nafs13054094mpp037-se-2052054.html

Monday Jan 06, 2014

Some nice new features in Oracle Appliance Manager 2.8 (OAK 2.8)

Oracle Appliance Manager 2.8 (aka, OAK 2.8) has a number of new, useful, and important features that further enhance ODA product capability and flexibility. In a nutshell, the following are the key new enhancements in OAK 2.8.  You can find details of each of these new features in the Oracle Database Appliance Getting Started Guide.

Support for a shared repository for virtual machines and templates – If you are an ODA Virtualized Platform user, then this may be a big enhancement for you. In the earlier versions of Oracle Appliance Manager, the VM repository was stored only on local disks on each ODA server node. That restricted the amount of storage available for the storing and sizing VMs to the free space available on the local 600GB disks, which was 250GB on V1 ODA hardware and 350GB on the X3-2 ODA hardware. However, the newly available shared repository implementation allows for the creation of the VM repository on the shared storage, thereby significantly increasing the storage available for the VM repository.

You can create a shared repository using the “oakcli create repo <repository-name> -dg <disk-group-name> -size <size in GB>” command. You can place the repository in the DATA or the RECO ASM disk group. Placing the repository on the shared storage not only increases the capacity of the repository, it also makes the repository accessible on both server nodes, thereby facilitating VM failover capabilities.

Support for VLANs - With the 10GB network interfaces available on ODA, there is plenty of network bandwidth on the servers. VLAN (Virtual Local Area Network) provides a means to secure network traffic and isolate networks using logical identifiers. Broadcast propagated in one VLAN is thus not transmitted to the other VLANs. This also improves security as by placing devices in different broadcast domains, it is possible to limit access through the use of address filters and access lists. For communication across VLANs the traffic must pass through a layer-3 routing device, which can be configured to control and monitor access among different devices.

You can create and manage VLANs using OAKCLI commands. For example, use the "oakcli create vlan <vlan name> -vlanid <vlan tag id> -if <interface name> -node <0|1>" command to create a VLAN on ODA. Similarly, "oakcli show vlan", "oakcli delete vlan" commands are available to see VLAN configuration, delete a VLAN configuration, etc.

Database setup is now optional at the time of initial deployment – In the earlier versions of Oracle Appliance Manager, during the initial deployment, you had to create an initial database as part of the deployment. Sometimes, at the time of initial deployment users were not quite ready to create the database and needed to plan for its size, naming, and other configuration settings etc. With OAK 2.8, you now have the option to forgo the creation of this initial database.

Instead, you may choose to create the database after the initial deployment using the “oakcli create database …” command. Note that you may use the default parameter file (/opt/oracle/oak/install/dbconf/default.dbconf) that specifies the block size, database language, characterset, etc. or create a new db configuration parameter file using the “oakcli create db_config_params …) command before issuing the “oakcli create database…” command.

Hardware monitoring using OAKCLI – OAKCLI becomes even more powerful. From OAK 2.8 onwards, you can now monitor all hardware components (except storage, currently) of ODA using the OAKCLI command-line interface. This includes monitoring of servers, processors, memory, network interfaces, cooling units, and power units, etc.

To monitor a component, simply issue the “oakcli show <component-name>” command. Where component name may be “server”, “processor”, “memory”, “power”, “cooling”, or “network”.

Flexibility to have additional customizations – In the earlier version of Oracle Appliance Manager, standard UID/GID and usernames were used for Oracle and Grid users. If you need to adhere to certain local standards for usernames and ID numbers that you may have in place within your organization, then using the advanced deployment option of Appliance Manager you can now specify non-default UID/GID and usernames for Oracle and Grid owner users.

The advanced deployment option is invoked simply by issuing the “oakcli deploy –advance” command.

Thursday Oct 03, 2013

Comparing Oracle Database Appliance (ODA) with manually built and assembled systems

I thought I ought to have this note to outline the differences between typical old-style system building approach and the engineered system approach used for Oracle Database Appliance. Oracle Database Appliance is a unique, modern product that is revolutionary and disruptive. It is an Oracle engineered system that serves as a highly available database and application server. Its benefits are unique and unparalleled. However, as with any new, disruptive product, users may not readily recognize all the benefits. Often new customers ask for the benefits of choosing Oracle Database Appliance versus building your own system. The matrix below tries to summarize the benefits.

Oracle Database Appliance

Manually assembled systems

Single vendor – Customer only needs to contact Oracle for any and all problems with the system. Oracle is able to rapidly diagnose the problem, match it with a fingerprint of the issue, and provide immediate solution.

Multiple vendors – Servers, storage, networking gear, and software components may be sourced from different vendors, that causes finger pointing and makes it hard to obtain support quickly and effectively

No integration required – Oracle Database Appliance is a pre-integrated, pre-tested, pre-tuned configuration. It requires no integration, other than simply plugging in some cables.

Extensive integration required – The components sourced from multiple vendors must be compatible and interoperate successfully.

Instant deployment – Deployment of Oracle Database Appliance in a customer environment is as easy as plugging in the cables, powering on the system and issuing a command.

Long drawn error prone deployment process – Deployment of a manually built system requires setting up and validating each component, going through multiple steps to configure operating system, networking, storage, database, and so forth. A missed-step can be costly.

Best practices are included – Oracle Database Appliance is built from the grounds up with Oracle’s best practices in mind. These best practices cover operating system, networking, storage, database, and performance and availability best practices.

Best practices implementation requires considerable extra effort - Best practices must be identified and implemented for each component. This may not be an easy task by any measure.

Patching is quick and predictable – With a known hardware and software configuration, Oracle is able to provide pre-tested, complete patch bundles that cover the entire firmware and software stack. Further, Oracle is able to structure and tune the patching process so that it executed flawlessly in an optimal amount of time with predictable results.

Patching is time consuming, risky and unpredictable – Customers often patch one component at a time, thereby increasing the frequency of patching. Patching process is unpredictable and therefore risky. Vendors have no way of testing the exact configuration that a customer may be using.

Problem diagnostics are immediate – Oracle knows exactly which information and logs are required for instant diagnosis of problems as well as how to collect it. Oracle makes it trivial for customers to collect the information. Quick diagnosis results in rapid problem resolution.

Problem diagnostics is complex and long drawn – Multiple experts may be needed to diagnose problems. Often it may not be readily apparent what information is relevant and required for a corresponding problem. Longer diagnosis results in delayed problem resolution.

Performance is predictable – An engineered system makes deploying workloads a science not an art. The system capacity and capability can be quantified exactly and workloads can be deployed using simple mathematics.

Performance may not always be predictable – Making workloads perform on manually assembled systems remains an art. Due to the various components and stack layers from different vendors, typically configured using an imprecise math, it is usually not possible to define capacity and capability correctly.

Service requests can be opened automatically – In case of a problem, such as hardware failure, a service request can be opened automatically by the system using Oracle Auto Service Request. A solution may be available even before the customer recognizes the problem.

Service request initiation and management is complex – In case of a problem first the correct vendor needs to be identified. The service request needs to be manually managed and diagnostics data needs to be identified, manually collected, and sent to the vendor. Manual analysis of diagnostics further delays solution that may need to be tested before it is deployed.

Storage is integrated and managed as a whole – Storage is pre-integrated with the servers and the system is managed end-to-end as a whole, including monitoring, management, diagnostics, and repair of storage.

Storage is separate and managed separately – Storage is managed, monitored, diagnosed and repaired separately, typically provided by a different vendor and managed by storage administrators

Pay-as-you-go licensing saves costs substantially – Significant CPU power available but only CPUs used need to be licensed while the remaining CPU power is available for instant deployment if and when needed

Must pay for all CPUs on the system upfront – All CPUs present in the servers must be licensed upfront whether fully used or not. Additional CPU addition typically requires costly hardware upgrades

Versatile system with support for both native and virtualized environments – The same system and software supports both native and virtualized implementations, switching from one to the other is easy

Typically vendor specialized hardware sold for native or virtualized implementations – Implementation of native and virtualized environments could be fundamentally different.

Host both application and database in a single system (system in a box) – Supports hosting of entire application stack in a single system; virtualized platform makes it possible to segregate different tiers of application stack into different virtual machines that are easy to size and tune

Application is typically hosted on separate hardware (one system many boxes) – Application, web, and database tiers are typically hosted on separate hardware and storage; it is not easy to resize these environments unless hardware is replaced

It is amazing!

Wednesday Sep 25, 2013

Implementing Oracle Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) using Oracle Database Appliance (ODA)

Oracle Database Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) is Oracle’s blueprint for maximizing database uptime and availability for important business system and mission critical architecture. Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) and Oracle Data Guard and Oracle Database Best Practices are some of the key components of this architecture.  Oracle RAC provides high availability in the event of intra-site failures (failures that occur within the primary database environment, such as node failures, network failure, etc.) while Oracle Data Guard provides high availability in the event of site level failures, storage sub-system failures, and planned downtime. Within Oracle MAA, Oracle’s Database Best Practices ensure a consistent and optimal implementation of a database environment.

Traditionally, implementing Oracle Database MAA has been a complex and time consuming initiative, sometimes requiring weeks to months of efforts to fully implement. However, you can readily deploy Oracle Database Maximum Availability Architecture using Oracle Database Appliance (ODA). Oracle Database Appliance can provide the pre-built Oracle RAC highly available environment for each site and includes database best practices embedded in the pre-configured system.

Check out the white paper titled “Deploying Oracle Data Guard with Oracle Database Appliance” as it provides a reference sample implementation of Oracle Data Guard across Oracle Database Appliance environments.

Thursday May 23, 2013

Leverage the Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform

In my opinion, one of the best things to happen to Oracle Database Appliance recently was the availability of virtualization on the system. The virtualized Oracle Database Appliance (or "Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platorm" as it is officially called) allows you to run multiple virtual machines, hosting different tiers of your system architecture all within a single Oracle Database Appliance. And users love it! This is a major development for those looking for drastic cost reductions in managing their traditional multi-tier systems or even consolidating many systems into one, etc. Now you can have one single platform, that is already extremely easy to setup, operate, and manage, and host many virtual servers, deploying everything from your database to application logic tier to the web-tier and other supporting systems such as a load balancer, security server, etc. all in a single environment. Some ISVs are already looking for building and selling ready-to-go complete systems for their customers with everything inside one Oracle Database Appliance. 

The Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform can be used with Oracle Appliance Manager (OAK) 2.5 and above for V1 hardware and with OAK 2.5.5 and above with Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 hardware. If you are on the non-virtualized deployment of your Oracle Database Appliance (and all new systems are currently  shipped from the factory with the non-virtualized ISO image), then you must re-image the server with the Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform ISO image. Once you have re-imaged the servers with the virtualized platform ISO image, Oracle Appliance Manager lets you deploy a special virtual machine or domain called (ODA_BASE domain) to host all your databases. You allocate CPU and memory to this ODA_BASE domain as per your need (and available database licenses). Dedicated access to shared storage is provided to this domain by design (bypassing any negative performance impact of virtualization that it would otherwise incur) using the PCI pass through technique. The rest of the server capacity is available for deploying additional virtual machines for your application and web tiers and for other purposes.

You can check out the Oracle Database Appliance Getting Started Guide for more information. Also, the updated Oracle Database Appliance Setup Poster provides the details on setting up the Virtualized Platform on the Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 system. Virtualization for real!

Friday Dec 21, 2012

ASM Normal Redundancy versus High Redundancy on Oracle Database Appliance

The availability of normal redundancy configuration option for Automatic Storage Management (ASM) on Oracle Database Appliance starting with OAK version 2.4 allows for additional usable space on Oracle Database Appliance (about 6 TB with Normal Redundancy versus about 4 TB with High Redundancy). This is great news for many customers. Some environments, such as test and development systems, may benefit significantly as a result of this new option. However, the availability of Normal Redundancy option obviously should not be taken to mean that choosing Normal Redundancy may the best approach for all database environments. High redundancy would still provide a better and more resilient option (and may be a preferred choice) for mission critical production systems. It is therefore an option and not the default configuration choice. Many customers may choose to use Normal Redundancy for test, development, and other non-critical environments and High Redundancy for production and other important systems.

In general, ASM supports three types of redundancy (mirroring*) options.

High Redundancy - In this configuration, for each primary extent, there are two mirrored extents. For Oracle Database Appliance this means, during normal operations there would be three extents (one primary and two secondary) containing the same data, thus providing “high” level of protection. Since ASM distributes the partnering extents in a way that prevents all extents to be unable due to a component failure in the IO path, this configuration can sustain at least two simultaneous disk failures on Oracle Database Appliance (which should be rare but is possible).

Normal Redundancy - In this configuration, for each primary extent, there is one mirrored (secondary) extent. This configuration protects against at least one disk failure. Note that in the event a disk fails in this configuration, although there is typically no outage or data loss, the system operates in a vulnerable state, should a second disk fail while the old failed disk replacement has not completed. Many Oracle Database Appliance customers thus prefer the High Redundancy configuration to mitigate the lack of additional protection during this time.

External Redundancy - In this configuration there are only primary extents and no mirrored extents. This option is typically used in traditional non-appliance environments when the storage sub-system may have existing redundancy such as hardware mirroring or other types of third-party mirroring in place. Oracle Database Appliance does not support External Redundancy.

*ASM redundancy is different from traditional disk mirroring in that ASM mirroring is a logical-physical approach than a pure physical approach. ASM does not mirror entire disks. It mirrors logical storage entities called ‘extents’ that are allocated on physical disks. Thus, all “mirrored” extents of a set of primary extents on a given disk do not need to be on a single mirrored disk but they could be distributed across multiple disks. This approach to mirroring provides significant benefits and flexibility. ASM uses intelligent, Oracle Database Appliance architecture aware, extent placement algorithms to maximize system availability in the event of disk failure(s).

Tuesday Nov 06, 2012

Build vs Buy Webcast: November 8, 2012

Date: Thursday, November 8, 2012, 1:00 PM EST

You have a choice. Do you build your own database platform or buy a pre-engineered database appliance?

Building a high-availability database platform presents unique challenges. Combining servers, storage, networking, OS, firmware, and database is complicated and raises important concerns: Will coordination between multiple SME’s delay deployment? Will it be reliable? Will it scale? Will routine maintenance consume precious IT-staff time? Ultimately, will it work?

Enter the Oracle Database Appliance, a complete package of software, server, storage, and networking that’s engineered for simplicity. It saves time and money by simplifying deployment, maintenance, and support of database workloads. Plus, it’s based on Intel Xeon processors to ensure a high level of performance and scalability.

Attend this Webcast to hear customer stories and discover how the Oracle Database Appliance:
  • Increases ROI by reducing capital and operational expenses
  • Frees IT staff by reducing deployment and management time from weeks to hours
  • Takes the worry out of supporting mission critical application workloads

Register For this WebCast today!

Thursday May 31, 2012

Oracle Database Appliance Setup Poster Updated

The newly updated Setup Poster for Oracle Database Appliance is now available at http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E22693_01/doc.21/e35554.pdf

This updated poster is a comprehensive source of information for anyone planning to deploy Oracle Database Appliance. It includes two main sections (which are conveniently printed on the two sides of a single 11x17 page)

1. Preparing to Deploy Oracle Database Appliance
2. Oracle Database Appliance Setup

The Preparing to Deploy Oracle Database Appliance section provides a concise list of items to plan for and review before beginning deployment. This includes registering Support Identifiers, allocating IP addresses, downloading software and patches, choosing configuration options, as well as important links to useful information.

The Oracle Database Appliance Setup section provides a step by step procedure for deploying and configuring Oracle Database Appliance. This includes initial powering up of Oracle Database Appliance, configuring initial network, downloading software and completing the configuration using Oracle Database Appliance Configurator (GUI)

 

Thursday May 24, 2012

Oracle Database Appliance Unplugged @ Northern California Oracle Users Group

The Oracle Database Appliance is Simple, Reliable, & Affordable.  Still skeptical about the 'reliability'?

Join Sohan DeMel, Vice President, Product Strategy and Business Development, at the Northern California Oracle Users Group to demonstrate the fault-tolerance of the Oracle Database Appliance.

 A recent addition to Oracle’s Engineered System category, the Oracle Database Appliance offers customers a fully integrated system of software, servers, storage and networking in a single box that delivers high availability database services for a wide range of applications. Oracle Database Appliance has fault-tolerance built-in: The hardware is fully redundant. Oracle RAC protects against server failure and database instance failure. Oracle ASM triple mirroring maintains data redundancy. Storage multi-pathing and network bonding are built-in. In this demo-based presentation, members of the audience will be invited on-stage to literally unplug the Oracle Database Appliance – pull-out power cords, pull-out network cords, pull-out server trays, and pull out disks, all while the database is processing SwingBench transactions on the big screen.

When: May 31, 2012

Where: The NoCOUG Spring Conference

Go to the NoCoug.org web site for more information and to RSVP to this very exciting presentation and conference!


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The Oracle Database Appliance saves time and money by simplifying deployment, maintenance, and support of high-availability database solutions. This blog is dedicated to sharing updates about the Oracle Database Appliance from your product team.

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