Tuesday Apr 30, 2013

NetMotion Wireless Migrates Product from Microsoft SQL Server to MySQL: Reduces Costs and Increases Flexibility


NetMotion Wireless develops software to manage and secure wireless data deployments for organizations with mobile field workers. Founded in 2001, NetMotion Wireless is one of the fastest growing wireless and technology companies and the recipient of over 25 awards for outstanding technology.  NetMotion Wireless has over 2,500 customers, including Advocate Healthcare, Comcast, and Unilever.


NetMotion Wireless had used Microsoft SQL Server with Mobility Analytics, their mobile VPN product’s analytics module, but found it was too costly and lacked the platform and language flexibility to be a good [embedded] database. As a result, when the NetMotion Wireless product team was developing Locality, a cellular network management product, they decided to find an alternative database to use with it and with Mobility Analytics. The team compared MySQL with Microsoft SQL Server on a number of key criteria and, after finding nothing in the “con column”, decided to use MySQL.


According to Jonathan Wiggs, NetMotion Wireless database architect, MySQL has been able to meet their products’ needs for:

  • Real-time Data Collection and Analysis – with the ability to scale to hundreds of terabytes.
  • Strong .NET and Java Support“MySQL works every bit as well with ado.net as SQL Server, and its Java integration is equally good,” said Wiggs.
  • Database Profiling and Tracing – MySQL Enterprise Monitor provided back level visibility on par with other enterprise databases, providing the data analytics and caching levels their products require.  
  • Easy, Transparent Administration -“MySQL’s administration is automated, easy to configure, and highly configurable: we can get it to leap through any flaming hoops we need,” said Wiggs.
  • “The Perfect Trifecta” - “There has been no tradeoff in using MySQL.  MySQL has provided the perfect trifecta of feature parity, ease of integration, and lower cost,” said Wiggs.

Read more>>

Wednesday Apr 17, 2013

MySQL Community Reception - Celebrate with Oracle's MySQL Team!

Join Oracle’s MySQL team on April 22 to celebrate the general availability of MySQL 5.6. Get together in a relaxed atmosphere—make a toast, enjoy product demos and fun activities, and celebrate the MySQL community effort and contributions that made the latest release possible. Register here today!

Date: Monday, April 22, 2013

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Location: TechMart Santa Clara
5201 Great America Parkway
Santa Clara, CA, USA
(1-minute walk from Hyatt Regency Santa Clara)

Don't miss the opportunity to enjoy an evening of casual but informative conversation, with complimentary food and refreshments from Oracle! Walk-ins are also welcome.

Tuesday Apr 09, 2013

Upcoming & Past Events with MySQL attendance

Just a reminder for 2 important MySQL events as they have already been announced:

MySQL Community Reception - “Let’s Celebrate MySQL 5.6 GA!”

  • Date: Apr 22, 2013
  • Place: TechMart Santa Clara,  5201 Great America Parkway,  Santa Clara,  CA 95054
  • See the whole announcement here;
  • More information and registration is available here.

MySQL Connect CfP is open by April 12, 2013.

  • Date: Sep 21-23, 2013
  • Place: SFO, US
  • See the whole announcement here;
  • More information and session submission can be found here.

You can find more upcoming events where either MySQL engineers or the community team is going to attend at our wikis page.

Friday Mar 29, 2013

“Let’s Celebrate MySQL 5.6 GA!” - MySQL Community Reception by Oracle

Join Oracle’s MySQL Team on April 22, 2013, as we celebrate the general availability of MySQL 5.6. With product demos and fun activities in a relaxing atmosphere, this is the party for the MySQL community to get together and have a toast on the work all of us did to make MySQL 5.6 the best release ever. Whether you are an attendee at Percona Live, a member of local MySQL user groups, a MySQL user in the San Francisco Bay Area, or simply interested in MySQL technology, you’re all invited to Oracle’s MySQL Community Reception.
    •    Mingle with your peers and learn from real-world experiences.
    •    Meet MySQL engineers and get the first-hand information on the latest product development.
    •    Have lots of fun!

Date: Monday, April 22, 2013

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Location: TechMart Santa Clara
5201 Great America Parkway
Santa Clara, CA, USA
(1-minute walk from Hyatt Regency Santa Clara)

Registration will be open soon. Mark your calendar today so you don't miss the opportunity to enjoy an evening of casual but informative conversation, with complimentary food and refreshments from Oracle!

Wednesday Feb 20, 2013

Enhance Your MySQL Skills with Virtual Developer Day: MySQL

MySQL is the world’s most popular open-source database, and powers websites and applications of numerous leading and fast-growing organizations.


On March 12, we’re hosting the first Virtual Developer Day: MySQL at 9am PST to give you a one-stop shop to learn all the essential MySQL skills and the latest features in MySQL 5.6 GA. With a combination of presentations and hands-on lab experience, you’ll have the opportunity to practice in your own environment and gain more in-depth knowledge to successfully design, develop, and manage your MySQL databases.


Virtual Developer Day: MySQL

Featuring speakers coming from Oracle’s MySQL engineering, support, product management, and sales consulting teams, this FREE virtual event has two tracks tailored for both fresh and experienced MySQL users. Attend the live sessions and sharpen your skills to:
•    Develop your new applications cost-effectively using MySQL
•    Improve performance of your existing MySQL databases
•    Manage your MySQL environment more efficiently

If you’re in Europe, Middle East or Africa, don’t worry! We have another live event for you on March 19 at 9:00 GMT so you can join the sessions and get better with MySQL during your business hours.

Don’t miss this opportunity so reserve your spot today!

Tuesday Feb 19, 2013

FOSDEM 2013

 FOSDEM 2013

During the weekend of Feb 2-3, 2013, the 13th edition of FOSDEM (Free Open-Source Developers' European Meeting) took place in Brussels, Belgium. This free event organized by volunteers brought together more than 7000 attendees from the open source community, which was much more than expected. It was located in the ULB Campus in several buildings covering about 488 sessions with a mix of keynotes, lightning talks, exams and developer rooms talks.

Both days were very busy on both places - MySQL stand and on Sunday also at MySQL & Friends developer room. We shared time on the stand with Lars Thalmann, Sveta Smirnova and Luis Soares - all had also very nice presentations at MySQL & Friends Developer room on Sunday, Feb 3rd. All 16 MySQL & Friends devroom sessions and its slides are or will be available at Fosdem website; unfortunately not all speakers gave us their slides to be uploaded at fosdem.org page, but we are working on that and I hope it will be soon available!

Overall MySQL & Friends devroom was successful, the room had seating for more than 100 people and in many sessions it was not enough! Here are some of the slides from the MySQL devroom:

  • Lars Thalmann, the Development Director for MySQL Replication, Backup, Connectors and Utilities run a session on What's new in MySQL;
  • Luis Soares, the Sr. Software Developer & MySQL Replication Team Lead (see Luis' FOSDEM blog) run the session on Advanced MySQL Replication Architectures, his slides can be found here;
  • Andrew Morgan, the MySQL Principal Product Manager had 2 sessions, one on Introduction to MySQL Cluster, second on NoSQL & SQL, both can be found at his FOSDEM blog; and also at Fosdem website.
  • Sveta Smirnova, the MySQL Principal Support Engineer than run a session on Troubleshooting MySQL performance.
  • And lastly Øystein Grøvlen, the Senior Principal Software Engineer in MySQL working on MySQL Query Optimizer had a session on When and How to Take Advantage of New Optimizer Features in MySQL 5.6.

For the missing slides please check the Fosdem website, if not yet all slides will be available soon.

A couple of photos from the event and also from the Saturday's social event can be found here.

Feb 19, 2013

Thursday Dec 20, 2012

Innodb Read Only Mode

Offers user a easy way to keep data write protected on RW and allows server to run even on RO media.[Read More]

Wednesday Dec 05, 2012

MySQL December Webinars

We'll be running 3 webinars next week and hope many of you will be able to join us:

MySQL Replication: Simplifying Scaling and HA with GTIDs

Wednesday, December 12, at 15.00 Central European Time

Join the MySQL replication developers for a deep dive into the design and implementation of Global Transaction Identifiers (GTIDs) and how they enable users to simplify MySQL scaling and HA. GTIDs are one of the most significant new replication capabilities in MySQL 5.6, making it simple to track and compare replication progress between the master and slave servers.

Register Now

MySQL 5.6: Building the Next Generation of Web/Cloud/SaaS/Embedded Applications and Services

Thursday, December 13, at 9.00 am Pacific Time

As the world's most popular web database, MySQL has quickly become the leading cloud database, with most providers offering MySQL-based services. Indeed, built to deliver web-based applications and to scale out, MySQL's architecture and features make the database a great fit to deliver cloud-based applications. In this webinar we will focus on the improvements in MySQL 5.6 performance, scalability, and availability designed to enable DBA and developer agility in building the next generation of web-based applications.

Register Now

Getting the Best MySQL Performance in Your Products: Part IV, Partitioning

Friday, December 14, at 9.00 am Pacific Time

We're adding Partitioning to our extremely popular "Getting the Best MySQL Performance in Your Products" webinar series. Partitioning can greatly increase the performance of your queries, especially when doing full table scans over large tables. Partitioning is also an excellent way to manage very large tables. It's one of the best ways to build higher performance into your product's embedded or bundled MySQL, and particularly for hardware-constrained appliances and devices.

Register Now

We have live Q&A during all webinars so you'll get the opportunity to ask your questions!


Monday Oct 15, 2012

HERMES Medical Solutions Helps Save Lives with MySQL

HERMES Medical Solutions was established in 1976 in Stockholm, Sweden, and is a leading innovator in medical imaging hardware/software products for health care facilities worldwide. HERMES delivers a plethora of different medical imaging solutions to optimize hospital workflow.

HERMES advanced algorithms make it possible to detect the smallest changes under therapies important and necessary to optimize different therapeutic methods and doses.

Challenges

  • Fighting illness & disease requires state-of-the-art imaging modalities and software in order to diagnose accurately, stage disease appropriately and select the best treatment available.
  • Selecting and implementing a new database platform that would deliver the needed performance, reliability, security and flexibility required by the high-end medical solutions offered by HERMES.

Solution

  • Decision to migrate from in-house database to an embedded SQL database powering the HERMES products, delivered either as software, integrated hardware and software solutions, or via the cloud in a software-as-a-service configuration.
  • Evaluation of several databases and selection of MySQL based on its high performance, ease of use and integration, and low Total Cost of Ownership.
  • On average, between 4 and 12 Terabytes of data are stored in MySQL databases underpinning the HERMES solutions. The data generated by each medical study is indeed stored during 10 years or more after the treatment was performed.
  • MySQL-based HERMES systems also allow doctors worldwide to conduct new drug research projects leveraging the large amount of medical data collected.
  • Hospitals and other HERMES customers worldwide highly value the “zero administration” capabilities and reliability of MySQL, enabling them to perform medical analysis without any downtime.
  • Relying on MySQL as their embedded database, the HERMES team has been able to increase their focus on further developing their clinical applications.
  • HERMES Medical Solutions could leverage the Oracle Financing payment plan to spread its investment over time and make the MySQL choice even more valuable.

MySQL has proven to be an excellent database choice for us. We offer high-end medical solutions, and MySQL delivers the reliability, security and performance such solutions require.” Jan Bertling, CEO.

Tuesday Sep 25, 2012

MySQL Connect in 4 Days - Sessions From Users and Customers

Let’s review today the conference sessions where users and customers will describe their use of MySQL as well as best practices.

Remember you can plan your schedule with Schedule Builder.

Saturday, 11.30 am, Room Golden Gate 7:

MySQL and Hadoop—Chris Schneider, Ning.com

Saturday, 1.00 pm, Room Golden Gate 7:

Thriving in a MySQL Replicated World—Ed Presz and Andrew Yee, Ticketmaster

Saturday, 1.00 pm, Room Golden Gate 8:

Rick’s RoTs (Rules of Thumb)—Rick James, Yahoo!

Saturday, 2.30 pm, Room Golden Gate 3:

Scaling Pinterest—Yashwanth Nelapati and Evrhet Milam, Pinterest

Saturday, 4.00 pm, Room Golden Gate 3:

MySQL Pool Scanner: An Automated Service for Host Management—Levi Junkert, Facebook

Sunday, 10.15 am, Room Golden Gate 3:

Big Data Is a Big Scam (Most of the Time)—Daniel Austin, PayPal

Sunday, 11.45 am, Room Golden Gate 3:

MySQL at Twitter: Development and Deployment—Jeremy Cole and Davi Arnaut, Twitter

Sunday, 1.15 pm, Room Golden Gate 3:

CERN’s MySQL-as-a-Service Deployment with Oracle VM: Empowering Users—Dawid Wojcik and Eric Grancher, DBA, CERN

Sunday, 2.45 pm, Room Golden Gate 3:

Database Scaling at Mozilla—Sheeri Cabral, Mozilla

Sunday, 5.45 pm, Room Golden Gate 4:

MySQL Cluster Carrier Grade Edition @ El Chavo, Latin America’s #1 Facebook Game—Carlos Morales, Playful Play

You can check out the full program here as well as in the September edition of the MySQL newsletter.

Not registered yet? You can still save US$ 300 over the on-site fee – Register Now!

Monday Sep 24, 2012

MySQL Connect in Only 5 Days – Some Fun Stuff!

We’ve recently blogged about the various MySQL Connect sessions focused on MySQL Cluster, InnoDB, the MySQL Optimizer and MySQL Replication. But we also wanted to draw your attention to some great opportunities to network and have fun! That’s also part of what makes a good conference...

MySQL Connect Reception

San Francisco Hilton - Continental Ballroom

6:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m.

A great opportunity to network with Oracle’s MySQL engineers, partners having a booth in the exhibition hall and just about everyone at MySQL Connect. Long time MySQL users will see many familiar faces, and new users will be able to build valuable relationships. A must attend reception for sure!

Taylor Street Open House

7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

After two intense days at MySQL Connect, you’ll get the chance to relax and continue networking at the Taylor Street Café Open House on Sunday evening. Perhaps recharging batteries for a full week at Oracle OpenWorld…

The Oracle OpenWorld Music Festival

Starting on Sunday eve and running through the entire duration of Oracle OpenWorld, the first Oracle OpenWorld Musical Festival features some of today’s breakthrough musicians. It’s five nights of back-to-back performances in the heart of San Francisco. Registered Oracle conference attendees get free admission, so remember your badge when you head to a show. More information here.

You can check out the full MySQL Connect program here as well as in the September edition of the MySQL newsletter.

Not registered yet? You can still save US$ 300 over the on-site fee – Register Now!

Wednesday Aug 29, 2012

MySQL: Best of Breed Database

Oracle offers best of breed technology at every layer of the stack, from servers and storage to applications.

Discover why MySQL is a best of breed database solution for:

  • Web-based applications, including the next generation of highly demanding web, cloud, mobile and social application
  • Distributed applications requiring a powerful and reliable embedded database
  • Custom and departmental enterprise applications on Windows and other platforms

Check out our Resource Center to get access to white papers and other resources.

And, remember to register for MySQL Connect if you haven’t done so yet. You can still save US$ 300 over the on-site fee – Register Now!

Friday Aug 24, 2012

Interview with Lenz Grimmer about MySQL Connect

Keith Larson: Thank you for allowing me to do this interview with you.  I have been talking with a few different Oracle ACEs   about the MySQL Connect Conference. I figured the MySQL community might be missing you as well. You have been very busy with Oracle Linux but I know you still have an eye on the MySQL Community. How have things been?

Lenz Grimmer: Thanks for including me in this series of interviews, I feel honored! I've read the other interviews, and really liked them. I still try to follow what's going on over in the MySQL community and it's good to see that many of the familiar faces are still around. Over the course of the 9 years that I was involved with MySQL, many colleagues and contacts turned into good friends and we still maintain close relationships.

It's been almost 1.5 years ago that I moved into my new role here in the Linux team at Oracle, and I really enjoy working on a Linux distribution again (I worked for SUSE before I joined MySQL AB in 2002). I'm still learning a lot - Linux in the data center has greatly evolved in so many ways and there are a lot of new and exciting technologies to explore.


Keith Larson: What were your thoughts when you heard that Oracle was going to deliver the MySQL Connect conference to the MySQL Community?

Lenz Grimmer: I think it's testament to the fact that Oracle deeply cares about MySQL, despite what many skeptics may say. What started as "MySQL Sunday" two years ago has now evolved into a full-blown sub-conference, with 80 sessions at one of the largest corporate IT events in the world. I find this quite telling, not many products at Oracle enjoy this level of exposure! So it certainly makes me feel proud to see how far MySQL has come.


Keith Larson: Have you had a chance to look over the sessions? What are your thoughts on them?

Lenz Grimmer: I did indeed look at the final schedule.The content committee did a great job with selecting these sessions. I'm glad to see that the content selection was influenced by involving well-known and respected members of the MySQL community. The sessions cover a broad range of topics and technologies, both covering established topics as well as recent developments.

Keith Larson: When you get a chance, what sessions do you plan on attending?

Lenz Grimmer: I will actually be manning the Oracle booth in the exhibition area on one of these days, so I'm not sure if I'll have a lot of time attending sessions. But if I do, I'd love to see the keynotes and catch some of the sessions that talk about recent developments and new features in MySQL, High Availability and Clustering . Quite a lot has happened and it's hard to keep up with this constant flow of new MySQL releases.

In particular, the following sessions caught my attention:


Keith Larson: So I will ask you just like I have asked the others I have interviewed, any tips that you would give to people for handling the long hours at conferences?

Lenz Grimmer: Wear comfortable shoes and make sure to drink a lot! Also prepare a plan of the sessions you would like to attend beforehand and familiarize yourself with the venue, so you can get to the next talk in time without scrambling to find the location. The good thing about piggybacking on such a large conference like Oracle OpenWorld is that you benefit from the whole infrastructure. For example, there is a nice schedule builder that helps you to keep track of your sessions of interest. Other than that, bring enough business cards and talk to people, build up your network among your peers and other MySQL professionals!

Keith Larson: What features of the MySQL 5.6 release do you look forward to the most ?

Lenz Grimmer: There has been solid progress in so many areas like the InnoDB Storage Engine, the Optimizer, Replication or Performance Schema, it's hard for me to really highlight anything in particular. All in all, MySQL 5.6 sounds like a very promising release. I'm confident it will follow the tradition that Oracle already established with MySQL 5.5, which received a lot of praise even from very critical members of the MySQL community. If I had to name a single feature, I'm particularly and personally happy that the precise GIS functions have finally made it into a GA release - that was long overdue.

Keith Larson:  In your opinion what is the best reason for someone to attend this event?

Lenz Grimmer: This conference is an excellent opportunity to get in touch with the key people in the MySQL community and ecosystem and to get facts and information from the domain experts and developers that work on MySQL. The broad range of topics should attract people from a variety of roles and relations to MySQL, beginning with Developers and DBAs, to CIOs considering MySQL as a viable solution for their requirements.

Keith Larson: You will be attending MySQL Connect and have some Oracle Linux Demos, do you see a growing demand for MySQL on Oracle Linux ?

Lenz Grimmer: Yes! Oracle Linux is our recommended Linux distribution and we have a good relationship to the MySQL engineering group. They use Oracle Linux as a base Linux platform for development and QA, so we make sure that MySQL and Oracle Linux are well tested together. Setting up a MySQL server on Oracle Linux can be done very quickly, and many customers recognize the benefits of using them both in combination.

Because Oracle Linux is available for free (including free bug fixes and errata), it's an ideal choice for running MySQL in your data center. You can run the same Linux distribution on both your development/staging systems as well as on the production machines, you decide which of these should be covered by a support subscription and at which level of support. This gives you flexibility and provides some really attractive cost-saving opportunities.

Keith Larson: Since I am a Linux user and fan, what is on the horizon for  Oracle Linux?

Lenz Grimmer: We're working hard on broadening the ecosystem around Oracle Linux, building up partnerships with ISVs and IHVs to certify Oracle Linux as a fully supported platform for their products. We also continue to collaborate closely with the Linux kernel community on various projects, to make sure that Linux scales and performs well on large systems and meets the demands of today's data centers. These improvements and enhancements will then rolled into the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel, which is the key ingredient that sets Oracle Linux apart from other distributions. We also have a number of ongoing projects which are making good progress, and I'm sure you'll hear more about this at the upcoming OpenWorld conference :)

Keith Larson: What is something that more people should be aware of when it comes to Oracle Linux and MySQL ?

Lenz Grimmer: Many people assume that Oracle Linux is just tuned for Oracle products, such as the Oracle Database or our Engineered Systems. While it's of course true that we do a lot of testing and optimization for these workloads, Oracle Linux is and will remain a general-purpose Linux distribution that is a very good foundation for setting up a LAMP-Stack, for example. We also provide MySQL RPM packages for Oracle Linux, so you can easily stay up to date if you need something newer than what's included in the stock distribution.

One more thing that is really unique to Oracle Linux is Ksplice, which allows you to apply security patches to the running Linux kernel, without having to reboot. This ensures that your MySQL database server keeps up and running and is not affected by any downtime.

Keith Larson: What else would you like to add ?

Lenz Grimmer: Thanks again for getting in touch with me, I appreciated the opportunity. I'm looking forward to MySQL Connect and Oracle OpenWorld and to meet you and many other people from the MySQL community that I haven't seen for quite some time!

Keith Larson:  Thank you Lenz!


Friday Aug 10, 2012

Interview with Giuseppe Maxia "the datacharmer" about MySQL Connect

Keith Larson: Thank you for allowing me to do this interview with you. What have you and Continuent been up to lately?

Giuseppe Maxia:  Hi Keith. It's my pleasure.  I (and the whole team at Continuent) have been quite busy releasing version 1.5.1 of our flagship clustering and HA product, Tungsten Enterprise. Apart from the pleasure of the growing business that makes us all very happy, we enjoy the rare geeky joy of working at a product at the highest levels of innovation and technical effectiveness.


 I am also happy, at a personal level, because my current job keeps me in touch with the MySQL community. The products that we develop, both the open source and the commercial solutions, depend heavily on the ubiquity of MySQL. When I dedicate some time to the MySQL community, I am doing at the same time something that I like and that is ultimately beneficial for my company's business. For this reason, my company has no objections to my work in open source projects that I started long ago, such as MySQL Sandbox.

Keith Larson: MySQL Sandbox is great, thank you for that!

Giuseppe Maxia:You're welcome! This one of the many MySQL related open projects that are maintained by community members. The MySQL world is a better place thanks to this distributed effort.

Keith Larson: What were your thoughts when you heard that Oracle was going to provide the community the MySQL Conference ?

Giuseppe Maxia: I had mixed feelings. On one hand, I was happy that Oracle has dedicated more attention to the MySQL community, by creating this event. On the other hand, I was a bit taken aback, because the decision to organize MySQL Connect came at the same time when Oracle made it known that it was not sending anyone to the April conference in Santa Clara. I understand very well the reasoning. That conference is organized by a competitor, and Oracle didn't want to help a competing business. However, there were more than one thousand MySQL users at that event, and many of them would have been quite pleased to meet and listen to Oracle engineers.

I also understand that Oracle wants to give the MySQL community a proper home within its conference infrastructure. All in all, I consider MySQL Connect a positive step in the right direction. I hope and expect that MySQL Connect will grow in next editions, and that Oracle will offer an event that matches the scope of MySQL conferences that we are used to in the past.


Keith Larson: Since you are part of the content committee, what did you think of the submissions that were received during call for papers?

Giuseppe Maxia:  Reviewing the submissions for this event was a difficult task. We had to limit the entries to the allotted number of sessions (56), and thus we had to leave out many proposals that would have been quite nice to have in a conference. The level of the proposals was quite high. In my initial screening, I found about 90 sessions that I wanted to get in, and the hard was to cut off the ones over the quota.

Keith Larson: What sessions do you look forwarding to attending?

Giuseppe Maxia: Surely I will attend most of the sessions where Oracle engineers explain the latest features and improvements of MySQL products. I will also attend sessions by other professionals who talk about my fields of interest, namely replication, high availability, performance, cloud integration.

Keith Larson: How do you feel the MySQL Community has changed in the recent years ? Do you feel it is different outside of the United States?


Giuseppe Maxia: The MySQL community has grown. In several directions. The community has followed many leads. There were some prophets of doom that announced the death of MySQL. They gathered credit because sometimes the ones who shout louder get more followers, regardless of their merits.
 There were more people, including several Oracle competitors, who believed that Oracle doesn't have any interest in killing MySQL, and instead it will be better off keeping MySQL alive and thriving. Which is what Oracle has been doing in the last few years, quite effectively so! The way I see it, the MySQL community is getting the message that MySQL is improving under Oracle stewardship, and concentrating on practicalities rather than philosophical diatribes.


 The places where the masses are less inclined to being practical and keep pursuing forks and changes for the sake of it are in the associated communities, those that depend in some extent by MySQL, or where MySQL is an important component, like content management projects, Linux distros, language infrastructures. I often see discussions that say "we should abandon MySQL and use instead a fork, because Oracle can't be depended upon for keeping the project alive." There is no amount of reasoning that can be injected in discussion that start by denying the current evidence, so I know that the community will keep this state of fluidity for a while.
 I haven't attended many events in Europe this year, so my feelings are based on what I see online. I feel that the community in the US is being more empirical than in Europe.


 My personal stand is that as long as Oracle keeps the work on MySQL to the current level, there is no need to worry for the open source community about the fate of MySQL.

Keith Larson: What features of MySQL 5.6 do you look forward to the most ?

Giuseppe Maxia: The improvement on the binary logging API and replication are among the most interesting ones. There are the obvious advances in performance, which everyone should expect from a new MySQL release. I have tested MySQL 5.6 replication features quite a lot. At the time of my testing (in April), there were some gaps in the integration between the main features. I hope such gaps will be filled in the final release.

Keith Larson: Would you consider the MySQL 5.6 release a major/big step forward in terms of Replication ?

Giuseppe Maxia: MySQL 5.6 is certainly a big step forward. I am cautious about its final outcome, as I have mentioned above, since I wait to see if the new features will become better integrated among them and with the rest of the server. There are great features, but you surely know that MySQL has historically had integration problems with new code, which sometimes resulted in the so-called "half-baked features."  I am not saying that this is the case with 5.6, but my first tests show that some features do not play well with the others in the same release. To give you an example: we have Global Transaction ID (GTID) and multi-thread slaves. If you enable GTID, the multi thread slaves still keep track of their work using binary log file names and position. This is the status for 5.6.5. I don't know if it has already been addressed.

Keith Larson:You attend a lot of conferences. What would you recommend for people who attend this conference.

Giuseppe Maxia: There are two main benefits by attending this kind of conferences: the first and most obvious is what you get by attending well selected sessions. The second, and sometimes more productive benefit is given by meeting other people who share your interests, and exchanging views with them. I would say that I have learned as much during social events and corridor chats as at the sessions themselves. The greatest benefit of this conference is the chance of talking with the people who work at the products that we use on a daily basis, and give them feedback about our experience.

Keith Larson: Since your often speaker at conference, what would you consider the ideal audience? What do you want or prefer from them?

Giuseppe Maxia: I am a geek. As such, I love talking to technically oriented users. It's very rewarding when you can address an advanced audience about demanding topics. But I also like explaining things to beginners. I remember my learning curve when I was a rookie, and I try to give my audience what I would have liked to get when I was in their position. So, while my ideal audience is a crowd of hackers, I feel perfectly at home talking to a roomful of motivated beginners.
 What I would like from my audience is to be inquisitive, and not to take anything for granted. When I talk at a conference, I often learn something new from the audience questions. For this reason, I encourage questions at any time during my presentations, unless the time is really short.

Keith Larson: So any tips you would give to people for handling the long hours at conferences?

Giuseppe Maxia: The first thing to do is getting organized by knowing what sessions you want to attend. Once you prioritize what you can't possibly miss, you can start organizing the rest of the time. There is no obligation to attend a session if there is nothing that appeals to you in a give slot. No need to feel guilty if you skip one slot to do something else, like visiting the expo hall or meeting friends. However, you should get organized, so you won't waste time.
 It's quite effective using Twitter with appropriate hashtags before and during the conference, to find people you know and to meet new ones with the same interests. Reading blogs and forums in the weeks before the conference will give you most of the ideas. For the ones who didn't do their homework, hanging around the MySQL community booth can give you useful information about who's there, what's going on, and what you can do productively in the next 50 minutes.

Keith Larson: What would you consider to be the top argument to persuade a boss to allow you to attend MySQL Connect?

Giuseppe Maxia:  It's the conference where we meet the creators of MySQL. If this is the main tool for our company, that's the place where we need to go to get first hand information. Besides, San Francisco is a great place!

Keith Larson: Anything else you want to add...

Giuseppe Maxia:  I am glad that Oracle is keeping the doors open for the MySQL community. My personal opinion is that it can open way more than that, and I hope that such further opening will happen in the time being. As an Oracle ACE Director, I feel it's my duty to smooth the path in that direction, by advising Oracle on what the community expects, and by giving objective and useful information to my fellow community members.
 I wish to see a 4 days MySQL event next year!

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