Zero Degree Turn -- Persian TV mini-Series

 

Farnaz Fassihi of The Wall Street Journal ("Iranian Unlikely TV Hit"), Washington Post, Nasser Karimi of Associated Press ("Iran's Newest Hero Aids WWII Era Jews"), a certain teenage family member ("Persian Stuff: Zero Degree Turn") and now NPR ("Romance on Iranian TV Crosses Cultures") have all published stories and bits and pieces about "Zero Degree Turn," an Iranian TV mini-series shot in Paris and Budapest.

The mini-series involves a love story between an Iranian-Palestinian Muslim man and a French Jewish woman during World War II. It is based on the true story of an Iranian student-diplomat in Paris who saved some 1,000 French Jews by issuing Iranian passports to them as a means of passage to the safety of neutral Iran.

YouTube seems to have some pieces of some of the episodes. I hear that the theme song of the mini-series has become quite a hit in Iran, and every Monday night people gather to watch it. Here, in the U.S. it broadcasts every Friday night on JJTVN through free satellite connection.

(I also ran into a CNN character and political analysis of the mini-series on YouTube. Unfortunately, it was grossly, almost purposefully, inaccurate. While commenting on the mini-series, the reporters don't even bother with getting any of the characters correctly and blatantly confuse very minor characters for the major ones. However, I am hardly surprised. Much of the mainstream media's bar on accuracy in reporting on Iran remains fixed shamefully low.) 

Comments:

Please post links for news sites you think present a fair view, Alas, most of us are limited to the ones published in English.

Posted by Geetha on September 21, 2007 at 11:28 AM PDT #

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I'll see if I can find other news sites that provide a more fair view.
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In the meantime, I think <i>WSJ</i>'s Farnaz Fassihi's interview with NPR (see the NPR report noted above) is not bad. However, her <i>WSJ</i> report has obviously seen some "editorial" pen after its filing. Some paragraphs seem to have been inserted, others removed, by the <i>WSJ</i> "copy" editor to bring it into line. That's a common practice and an editors' "prerogative" commonly practiced here.
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Posted by M. Mortazavi on September 21, 2007 at 12:34 PM PDT #

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