How Reporters Lead With Loaded Questions

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks his mind about Iran to The Wall Street Journal despite the reporter's attempt to lead him on with loaded questions. By the way, setting the context is a common reporting practice which can be and is regularly used by almost all reporters. Some use it with skill and fairly. Others are quite inept and use it for relatively mundane or dubious purposes.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan told The Wall Street Journal that Turkey is not afraid of Iran, and then asked the question "Why should we be?". The reply came after the following question by the interviewer was posed, "Are you worried about Iran's nuclear program?". The Turkish PM then went on to say: "As you know we are a member of NATO. We were a neighbor of the Soviet Union for a long time and were not scared during those days either."

Robert Pollock reminded Erdogan of the movie "Kurtlar Vadisi" (Valley of the Wolves), which was criticized for being anti-American, and made a joke to Erdogan saying "Be careful, they may not let you in the US!"

Erdogan evaluated the movie and said, "For example Abu Gharib Prison, we saw it on TV. And now it is Guantanamo Bay on the agenda of the World press. Of course this film might have been influenced by these."

If this Hurriyet report of the interview is correct, most astonishing to me would be Pollock's barely veiled brandishing of a potential threat to deny Erdogan entry to the U.S.

Perhaps, the reporter would rather have Turkey go back to the rule by the friendly dictators rather than by an elected liberal and populist?

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