Hours of Internet Video Watched

Financial Times reports that there are not enough ways and experts to dispatch and attach ads on video service web sites, and a Wall Street Journal columnist and others scrub YouTube for data that can help size the viewers and hours of use.

Last May, FT published a story on the three largest video distribution services on the web. The story reminds readers of Yahoo's acquisition of "Web 2.0" services such as Flickr, del.icio.us and upcoming.org. (The latter is posting an upcoming "web 2.0 conference" also sponsored by Sun Microsystems Inc.) These are simple services that do something specific very well. 

An earlier FT report published in April explores YouTube's early growth and a later report on branded channels, while noting the challenges with advertising:

So far, advertising has been limited, partly reflecting advertisers’ caution about being linked with inappropriate home-made videos or illegal copies of professional material.

Lee Gomes, WSJ Internet columnist, has scrubbed YouTube and produced an interesting report this Wednesday drawing on his own data as well as those of others including academicians' and industry watchers'. Gomes reports that the number of videos has grown by 20% in the last month alone, from 5 to 6 million pieces. Gomes quotes Johan Pouwelse, a Delft University professor, saying that 70% of YouTube's registered users are American and roughly half are under 20 years of age.

The oldest active viewer apparently is geriatric1927, a 79-year old U.K. resident who sits at his PC in his study with headphones on and narrates memories of World War II. Ernie Rogers, a 23-year old from Colton, Calif., whose handle is "lamo1234," has watched more YouTube videos than anyone. Mr. Rogers claims he is on the site 24/7. And as "the YouTube rockstar," he has shared his original songs, including one called "Waste of Time."

"The total time the people of the world spent watching YouTube since it started last year. The figure is -- drum roll, please -- 9,305 years!" writes Gomes in his column.

In the meantime, here's a couple of strange videos one could probably only watch on YouTube from here in the U.S.:

  1. Sham-e Aroosi ("Wedding Dinner"). This Persian one uses a Michael Jackson tune as the background music for an Iranian movie commercial about that repeating movie story about the father of the bride.
  2. Revayat ("Story"). This is an Azeri song which seems to have been produced in Azerbijan Republic. It should have been song in the background of Azeri instruments that the famous Ashig musicians play, i.e. the tar string instrument held horizontally at the chest level, and played with intensity and a beat identical to the beat of this particular song. Instead we here some strange electronic instrument repeating a very boring tune in the background of this classically styled song.

 

Comments:

Post a Comment:
Comments are closed for this entry.
About

MortazaviBlog

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today