Monday Nov 25, 2013

World Record Single System TPC-H @10000GB Benchmark on SPARC T5-4

Oracle's SPARC T5-4 server delivered world record single server performance of 377,594 QphH@10000GB with price/performance of $4.65/QphH@10000GB USD on the TPC-H @10000GB benchmark. This result shows that the 4-chip SPARC T5-4 server is significantly faster than the 8-chip server results from HP (Intel x86 based).

  • The SPARC T5-4 server with four SPARC T5 processors is 2.4 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with eight x86 processors.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server delivered 4.8 times better performance per chip and 3.0 times better performance per core than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server has 28% better price/performance than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server (for the price/QphH metric).

  • The SPARC T5-4 server with 2 TB memory is 2.4 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with 4 TB memory (for the composite metric).

  • The SPARC T5-4 server took 9 hours, 37 minutes, 54 seconds for data loading while the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server took 8.3 times longer.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server accomplished the refresh function in around a minute, the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server took up to 7.1 times longer to do the same function.

This result demonstrates a complete data warehouse solution that shows the performance both of individual and concurrent query processing streams, faster loading, and refresh of the data during business operations. The SPARC T5-4 server delivers superior performance and cost efficiency when compared to the HP result.

Performance Landscape

The table lists the leading TPC-H @10000GB results for non-clustered systems.

TPC-H @10000GB, Non-Clustered Systems
System
Processor
P/C/T – Memory
Composite
(QphH)
$/perf
($/QphH)
Power
(QppH)
Throughput
(QthH)
Database Available
SPARC T5-4
3.6 GHz SPARC T5
4/64/512 – 2048 GB
377,594.3 $4.65 342,714.1 416,024.4 Oracle 11g R2 11/25/13
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E7-4870
8/80/160 – 4096 GB
158,108.3 $6.49 185,473.6 134,780.5 SQL Server 2012 04/15/13

P/C/T = Processors, Cores, Threads
QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better)
$/QphH = the Price/Performance metric in USD (smaller is better)
QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity (bigger is better)
QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity (bigger is better)

The following table lists data load times and average refresh function times.

TPC-H @10000GB, Non-Clustered Systems
Database Load & Database Refresh
System
Processor
Data Loading
(h:m:s)
T5
Advan
RF1
(sec)
T5
Advan
RF2
(sec)
T5
Advan
SPARC T5-4
3.6 GHz SPARC T5
09:37:54 8.3x 58.8 7.1x 62.1 6.4x
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E7-4870
79:28:23 1.0x 416.4 1.0x 394.9 1.0x

Data Loading = database load time
RF1 = throughput average first refresh transaction
RF2 = throughput average second refresh transaction
T5 Advan = the ratio of time to the SPARC T5-4 server time

Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org.

Configuration Summary and Results

Server Under Test:

SPARC T5-4 server
4 x SPARC T5 processors (3.6 GHz total of 64 cores, 512 threads)
2 TB memory
2 x internal SAS (2 x 300 GB) disk drives
12 x 16 Gb FC HBA

External Storage:

24 x Sun Server X4-2L servers configured as COMSTAR nodes, each with
2 x 2.5 GHz Intel Xeon E5-2609 v2 processors
4 x Sun Flash Accelerator F80 PCIe Cards, 800 GB each
6 x 4 TB 7.2K RPM 3.5" SAS disks
1 x 8 Gb dual port HBA

2 x 48 port Brocade 6510 Fibre Channel Switches

Software Configuration:

Oracle Solaris 11.1
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition

Audited Results:

Database Size: 10000 GB (Scale Factor 10000)
TPC-H Composite: 377,594.3 QphH@10000GB
Price/performance: $4.65/QphH@10000GB USD
Available: 11/25/2013
Total 3 year Cost: $1,755,709 USD
TPC-H Power: 342,714.1
TPC-H Throughput: 416,024.4
Database Load Time: 9:37:54

Benchmark Description

The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB, 10000GB, 30000GB and 100000GB) are not allowed by the TPC.

TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system.

The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric (QphH@SF, where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). QphH@SF is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multiple user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of the total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance to the QphH. A secondary metric is the storage efficiency, which is the ratio of total configured disk space in GB to the scale factor.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • COMSTAR (Common Multiprotocol SCSI Target) is the software framework that enables an Oracle Solaris host to serve as a SCSI Target platform. COMSTAR uses a modular approach to break the huge task of handling all the different pieces in a SCSI target subsystem into independent functional modules which are glued together by the SCSI Target Mode Framework (STMF). The modules implementing functionality at SCSI level (disk, tape, medium changer etc.) are not required to know about the underlying transport. And the modules implementing the transport protocol (FC, iSCSI, etc.) are not aware of the SCSI-level functionality of the packets they are transporting. The framework hides the details of allocation providing execution context and cleanup of SCSI commands and associated resources and simplifies the task of writing the SCSI or transport modules.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server achieved a peak IO rate of 37 GB/sec from the Oracle database configured with this storage.

  • Twelve COMSTAR nodes were mirrored to another twelve COMSTAR nodes on which all of the Oracle database files were placed. IO performance was high and balanced across all the nodes.

  • Oracle Solaris 11.1 required very little system tuning.

  • Some vendors try to make the point that storage ratios are of customer concern. However, storage ratio size has more to do with disk layout and the increasing capacities of disks – so this is not an important metric when comparing systems.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server and Oracle Solaris efficiently managed the system load of nearly two thousand Oracle Database parallel processes.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

TPC Benchmark, TPC-H, QphH, QthH, QppH are trademarks of the Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). Results as of 11/25/13, prices are in USD. SPARC T5-4 www.tpc.org/3293; HP ProLiant DL980 G7 www.tpc.org/3285.

Wednesday Jun 12, 2013

SPARC T5-4 Produces World Record Single Server TPC-H @3000GB Benchmark Result

Oracle's SPARC T5-4 server delivered world record single server performance of 409,721 QphH@3000GB with price/performance of $3.94/QphH@3000GB on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark. This result shows that the 4-chip SPARC T5-4 server is significantly faster than the 8-chip server results from IBM (POWER7 based) and HP (Intel x86 based).

This result demonstrates a complete data warehouse solution that shows the performance both of individual and concurrent query processing streams, faster loading, and refresh of the data during business operations. The SPARC T5-4 server delivers superior performance and cost efficiency when compared to the IBM POWER7 result.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server with four SPARC T5 processors is 2.1 times faster than the IBM Power 780 server with eight POWER7 processors and 2.5 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with eight x86 processors on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark. The SPARC T5-4 server also delivered better performance per core than these eight processor systems from IBM and HP.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server with four SPARC T5 processors is 2.1 times faster than the IBM Power 780 server with eight POWER7 processors on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server costs 38% less per $/QphH@3000GB compared to the IBM Power 780 server with the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server took 2 hours, 6 minutes, 4 seconds for data loading while the IBM Power 780 server took 2.8 times longer.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server executed the first refresh function (RF1) in 19.4 seconds, the IBM Power 780 server took 7.6 times longer.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server with four SPARC T5 processors is 2.5 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with the same number of cores on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server took 2 hours, 6 minutes, 4 seconds for data loading while the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server took 4.1 times longer.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server executed the first refresh function (RF1) in 19.4 seconds, the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server took 8.9 times longer.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server delivered 6% better performance than the SPARC Enterprise M9000-64 server and 2.1 times better than the SPARC Enterprise M9000-32 server on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark.

Performance Landscape

The table lists the leading TPC-H @3000GB results for non-clustered systems.

TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems
System
Processor
P/C/T – Memory
Composite
(QphH)
$/perf
($/QphH)
Power
(QppH)
Throughput
(QthH)
Database Available
SPARC T5-4
3.6 GHz SPARC T5
4/64/512 – 2048 GB
409,721.8 $3.94 345,762.7 485,512.1 Oracle 11g R2 09/24/13
SPARC Enterprise M9000
3.0 GHz SPARC64 VII+
64/256/256 – 1024 GB
386,478.3 $18.19 316,835.8 471,428.6 Oracle 11g R2 09/22/11
SPARC T4-4
3.0 GHz SPARC T4
4/32/256 – 1024 GB
205,792.0 $4.10 190,325.1 222,515.9 Oracle 11g R2 05/31/12
SPARC Enterprise M9000
2.88 GHz SPARC64 VII
32/128/256 – 512 GB
198,907.5 $15.27 182,350.7 216,967.7 Oracle 11g R2 12/09/10
IBM Power 780
4.1 GHz POWER7
8/32/128 – 1024 GB
192,001.1 $6.37 210,368.4 175,237.4 Sybase 15.4 11/30/11
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560
8/64/128 – 512 GB
162,601.7 $2.68 185,297.7 142,685.6 SQL Server 2008 10/13/10

P/C/T = Processors, Cores, Threads
QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better)
$/QphH = the Price/Performance metric in USD (smaller is better)
QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity
QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity

The following table lists data load times and refresh function times during the power run.

TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems
Database Load & Database Refresh
System
Processor
Data Loading
(h:m:s)
T5
Advan
RF1
(sec)
T5
Advan
RF2
(sec)
T5
Advan
SPARC T5-4
3.6 GHz SPARC T5
02:06:04 1.0x 19.4 1.0x 22.4 1.0x
IBM Power 780
4.1 GHz POWER7
05:51:50 2.8x 147.3 7.6x 133.2 5.9x
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560
08:35:17 4.1x 173.0 8.9x 126.3 5.6x

Data Loading = database load time
RF1 = power test first refresh transaction
RF2 = power test second refresh transaction
T5 Advan = the ratio of time to T5 time

Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org.

Configuration Summary and Results

Hardware Configuration:

SPARC T5-4 server
4 x SPARC T5 processors (3.6 GHz total of 64 cores, 512 threads)
2 TB memory
2 x internal SAS (2 x 300 GB) disk drives

External Storage:

12 x Sun Storage 2540-M2 array with Sun Storage 2501-M2 expansion trays, each with
24 x 15K RPM 300 GB drives, 2 controllers, 2 GB cache
2 x Brocade 6510 Fibre Channel Switches (48 x 16 Gbs port each)

Software Configuration:

Oracle Solaris 11.1
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition

Audited Results:

Database Size: 3000 GB (Scale Factor 3000)
TPC-H Composite: 409,721.8 QphH@3000GB
Price/performance: $3.94/QphH@3000GB
Available: 09/24/2013
Total 3 year Cost: $1,610,564
TPC-H Power: 345,762.7
TPC-H Throughput: 485,512.1
Database Load Time: 2:06:04

Benchmark Description

The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB, 10000GB, 30000GB and 100000GB) are not allowed by the TPC.

TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system.

The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric (QphH@SF, where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). QphH@SF is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multiple user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of the total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance to the QphH. A secondary metric is the storage efficiency, which is the ratio of total configured disk space in GB to the scale factor.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • Twelve of Oracle's Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays with Sun Storage 2501-M2 expansion trays were used for the benchmark. Each contains 24 15K RPM drives and is connected to a single dual port 16Gb FC HBA using 2 ports through a Brocade 6510 Fibre Channel switch.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server achieved a peak IO rate of 33 GB/sec from the Oracle database configured with this storage.

  • Oracle Solaris 11.1 required very little system tuning.

  • Some vendors try to make the point that storage ratios are of customer concern. However, storage ratio size has more to do with disk layout and the increasing capacities of disks – so this is not an important metric when comparing systems.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server and Oracle Solaris efficiently managed the system load of two thousand Oracle Database parallel processes.

  • Six Sun Storage 2540-M2/2501-M2 arrays were mirrored to another six Sun Storage 2540-M2/25001-M2 arrays on which all of the Oracle database files were placed. IO performance was high and balanced across all the arrays.

  • The TPC-H Refresh Function (RF) simulates periodical refresh portion of Data Warehouse by adding new sales and deleting old sales data. Parallel DML (parallel insert and delete in this case) and database log performance are a key for this function and the SPARC T5-4 server outperformed both the IBM POWER7 server and HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server. (See the RF columns above.)

See Also

Disclosure Statement

TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH are trademarks of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). For more information, see www.tpc.org, results as of 6/7/13. Prices are in USD. SPARC T5-4 www.tpc.org/3288; SPARC T4-4 www.tpc.org/3278; SPARC Enterprise M9000 www.tpc.org/3262; SPARC Enterprise M9000 www.tpc.org/3258; IBM Power 780 www.tpc.org/3277; HP ProLiant DL980 www.tpc.org/3285. 

Wednesday Nov 30, 2011

SPARC T4-4 Beats 8-CPU IBM POWER7 on TPC-H @3000GB Benchmark

Oracle's SPARC T4-4 server delivered a world record TPC-H @3000GB benchmark result for systems with four processors. This result beats eight processor results from IBM (POWER7) and HP (x86). The SPARC T4-4 server also delivered better performance per core than these eight processor systems from IBM and HP. Comparisons below are based upon system to system comparisons, highlighting Oracle's complete software and hardware solution.

This database world record result used Oracle's Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays (rotating disk) connected to a SPARC T4-4 server running Oracle Solaris 11 and Oracle Database 11g Release 2 demonstrating the power of Oracle's integrated hardware and software solution.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server based configuration achieved a TPC-H scale factor 3000 world record for four processor systems of 205,792 QphH@3000GB with price/performance of $4.10/QphH@3000GB.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server with four SPARC T4 processors (total of 32 cores) is 7% faster than the IBM Power 780 server with eight POWER7 processors (total of 32 cores) on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is 36% better in price performance compared to the IBM Power 780 server on the TPC-H @3000GB Benchmark.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is 29% faster than the IBM Power 780 for data loading.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is up to 3.4 times faster than the IBM Power 780 server for the Refresh Function.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server with four SPARC T4 processors is 27% faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with eight x86 processors on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is 52% faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server for data loading.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is up to 3.2 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 for the Refresh Function.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server achieved a peak IO rate from the Oracle database of 17 GB/sec. This rate was independent of the storage used, as demonstrated by the TPC-H @3000TB benchmark which used twelve Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays (rotating disk) and the TPC-H @1000TB benchmark which used four Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array devices (flash storage). [*]

  • The SPARC T4-4 server showed linear scaling from TPC-H @1000GB to TPC-H @3000GB. This demonstrates that the SPARC T4-4 server can handle the increasingly larger databases required of DSS systems. [*]

  • The SPARC T4-4 server benchmark results demonstrate a complete solution of building Decision Support Systems including data loading, business questions and refreshing data. Each phase usually has a time constraint and the SPARC T4-4 server shows superior performance during each phase.

[*] The TPC believes that comparisons of results published with different scale factors are misleading and discourages such comparisons.

Performance Landscape

The table lists the leading TPC-H @3000GB results for non-clustered systems.

TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems
System
Processor
P/C/T – Memory
Composite
(QphH)
$/perf
($/QphH)
Power
(QppH)
Throughput
(QthH)
Database Available
SPARC Enterprise M9000
3.0 GHz SPARC64 VII+
64/256/256 – 1024 GB
386,478.3 $18.19 316,835.8 471,428.6 Oracle 11g R2 09/22/11
SPARC T4-4
3.0 GHz SPARC T4
4/32/256 – 1024 GB
205,792.0 $4.10 190,325.1 222,515.9 Oracle 11g R2 05/31/12
SPARC Enterprise M9000
2.88 GHz SPARC64 VII
32/128/256 – 512 GB
198,907.5 $15.27 182,350.7 216,967.7 Oracle 11g R2 12/09/10
IBM Power 780
4.1 GHz POWER7
8/32/128 – 1024 GB
192,001.1 $6.37 210,368.4 175,237.4 Sybase 15.4 11/30/11
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560
8/64/128 – 512 GB
162,601.7 $2.68 185,297.7 142,685.6 SQL Server 2008 10/13/10

P/C/T = Processors, Cores, Threads
QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better)
$/QphH = the Price/Performance metric in USD (smaller is better)
QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity
QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity

The following table lists data load times and refresh function times during the power run.

TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems
Database Load & Database Refresh
System
Processor
Data Loading
(h:m:s)
T4
Advan
RF1
(sec)
T4
Advan
RF2
(sec)
T4
Advan
SPARC T4-4
3.0 GHz SPARC T4
04:08:29 1.0x 67.1 1.0x 39.5 1.0x
IBM Power 780
4.1 GHz POWER7
05:51:50 1.5x 147.3 2.2x 133.2 3.4x
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560
08:35:17 2.1x 173.0 2.6x 126.3 3.2x

Data Loading = database load time
RF1 = power test first refresh transaction
RF2 = power test second refresh transaction
T4 Advan = the ratio of time to T4 time

Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org.

Configuration Summary and Results

Hardware Configuration:

SPARC T4-4 server
4 x SPARC T4 3.0 GHz processors (total of 32 cores, 128 threads)
1024 GB memory
8 x internal SAS (8 x 300 GB) disk drives

External Storage:

12 x Sun Storage 2540-M2 array storage, each with
12 x 15K RPM 300 GB drives, 2 controllers, 2 GB cache

Software Configuration:

Oracle Solaris 11 11/11
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition

Audited Results:

Database Size: 3000 GB (Scale Factor 3000)
TPC-H Composite: 205,792.0 QphH@3000GB
Price/performance: $4.10/QphH@3000GB
Available: 05/31/2012
Total 3 year Cost: $843,656
TPC-H Power: 190,325.1
TPC-H Throughput: 222,515.9
Database Load Time: 4:08:29

Benchmark Description

The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB, 10000GB, 30000GB and 100000GB) are not allowed by the TPC.

TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system.

The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric (QphH@SF, where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). QphH@SF is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multiple user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of the total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance to the QphH. A secondary metric is the storage efficiency, which is the ratio of total configured disk space in GB to the scale factor.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • Twelve Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays were used for the benchmark. Each Sun Storage 2540-M2 array contains 12 15K RPM drives and is connected to a single dual port 8Gb FC HBA using 2 ports. Each Sun Storage 2540-M2 array showed 1.5 GB/sec for sequential read operations and showed linear scaling, achieving 18 GB/sec with twelve Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays. These were stand alone IO tests.

  • The peak IO rate measured from the Oracle database was 17 GB/sec.

  • Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 required very little system tuning.

  • Some vendors try to make the point that storage ratios are of customer concern. However, storage ratio size has more to do with disk layout and the increasing capacities of disks – so this is not an important metric in which to compare systems.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server and Oracle Solaris efficiently managed the system load of over one thousand Oracle Database parallel processes.

  • Six Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays were mirrored to another six Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays on which all of the Oracle database files were placed. IO performance was high and balanced across all the arrays.

  • The TPC-H Refresh Function (RF) simulates periodical refresh portion of Data Warehouse by adding new sales and deleting old sales data. Parallel DML (parallel insert and delete in this case) and database log performance are a key for this function and the SPARC T4-4 server outperformed both the IBM POWER7 server and HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server. (See the RF columns above.)

See Also

Disclosure Statement

TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH are trademarks of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). For more information, see www.tpc.org. SPARC T4-4 205,792.0 QphH@3000GB, $4.10/QphH@3000GB, available 5/31/12, 4 processors, 32 cores, 256 threads; IBM Power 780 QphH@3000GB, 192,001.1 QphH@3000GB, $6.37/QphH@3000GB, available 11/30/11, 8 processors, 32 cores, 128 threads; HP ProLiant DL980 G7 162,601.7 QphH@3000GB, $2.68/QphH@3000GB available 10/13/10, 8 processors, 64 cores, 128 threads.

Monday Oct 03, 2011

SPARC T4-4 Beats IBM POWER7 and HP Itanium on TPC-H @1000GB Benchmark

Oracle's SPARC T4-4 server configured with SPARC-T4 processors, Oracle's Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array storage, Oracle Solaris, and Oracle Database 11g Release 2 achieved a TPC-H benchmark performance result of 201,487 QphH@1000GB with price/performance of $4.60/QphH@1000GB.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server benchmark results demonstrate a complete solution of building Decision Support Systems including data loading, business questions and refreshing data. Each phase usually has a time constraint and the SPARC T4-4 server shows superior performance during each phase.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is 22% faster than the 8-socket IBM POWER7 server with the same number of cores. The SPARC T4-4 server has over twice the performance per socket compared to the IBM POWER7 server.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server achieves 33% better price/performance than the IBM POWER7 server.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is up to 4 times faster than the IBM POWER7 server for the Refresh Function.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is 44% faster than the HP Superdome 2 server. The SPARC T4-4 server has 5.7x the performance per socket of the HP Superdome 2 server.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is 62% better on price/performance than the HP Itanium server.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is up to 3.7 times faster than the HP Itanium server for the Refresh Function.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server delivers nearly the same performance as Oracle's SPARC Enterprise M8000 server, but with 52% better price/performance on the TPC-H @1000GB benchmark.

  • Oracle used Storage Redundancy Level 3 as defined by the TPC-H 2.14.2 specification which is the strictest level.

  • This TPC-H result demonstrates that the SPARC T4-4 server can deliver the performance while running the increasingly larger databases required of DSS systems. The server measured more than 16 GB/sec of IO throughput through Oracle Database 11g Release 2 software while maintaining the high cpu load.

Performance Landscape

The table below lists published non-cluster results from comparable enterprise class systems from Oracle, IBM and HP. Each system was configured with 512 GB of memory.

TPC-H @1000GB

System
CPU type
Proc/Core/Thread
Composite
(QphH)
$/perf
($/QphH)
Power
(QppH)
Throughput
(QthH)
Database Available
SPARC Enterprise M8000
3 GHz SPARC64 VII+
16 / 64 / 128
209,533.6 $9.53 177,845.9 246,867.2 Oracle 11g 09/22/11
SPARC T4-4
3 GHz SPARC-T4
4 / 32 / 256
201,487.0 $4.60 181,760.6 223,354.2 Oracle 11g 10/30/11
IBM Power 780
4.14 GHz POWER7
8 / 32 / 128
164,747.2 $6.85 170,206.4 159,463.1 Sybase 03/31/11
HP Superdome 2
1.73 GHz Intel Itanium 9350
16 / 64 / 64
140,181.1 $12.15 139,181.0 141,188.3 Oracle 11g 10/20/10

QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better)
$/QphH = the Price/Performance metric (smaller is better)
QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity
QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity

Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org.

Configuration Summary and Results

Hardware Configuration:

SPARC T4-4 server
4 x SPARC-T4 3.0 GHz processors (total of 32 cores, 128 threads)
512 GB memory
8 x internal SAS (8 x 300 GB) disk drives

External Storage:

4 x Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array storage, each with
80 x 24 GB Flash Modules

Software Configuration:

Oracle Solaris 10 8/11
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition

Audited Results:

Database Size: 1000 GB (Scale Factor 1000)
TPC-H Composite: 201,487 QphH@1000GB
Price/performance: $4.60/QphH@1000GB
Available: 10/30/2011
Total 3 Year Cost: $925,525
TPC-H Power: 181,760.6
TPC-H Throughput: 223,354.2
Database Load Time: 1:22:39

Benchmark Description

The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB and 10000GB) are not allowed by the TPC.

TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system.

The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric (QphH@SF, where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). QphH@SF is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multi user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of QphH to total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • Four Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array devices were used for the benchmark. Each F5100 device contains 80 flash modules (FMODs). Twenty (20) FMODs from each F5100 device were connected to a single SAS 6 Gb HBA. A single F5100 device showed 4.16 GB/sec for sequential read and demonstrated linear scaling of 16.62 GB/sec with 4 x F5100 devices.

  • The IO rate from the Oracle database was over 16 GB/sec.

  • Oracle Solaris 10 8/11 required very little system tuning.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server and Oracle Solaris efficiently managed the system load of over one thousand Oracle parallel processes.

  • The Oracle database files for tables and indexes were managed by Oracle Automatic Storage Manager (ASM) with 4M stripe. Two F5100 devices were mirrored to another 2 F5100 devices under ASM. IO performance was high and balanced across all the FMODs.
  • The Oracle redo log files were mirrored across the F5100 devices using Oracle Solaris Volume Manager with 128K stripe.
  • Parallel degree on tables and indexes was set to 128. This setting worked the best for performance.
  • TPC-H Refresh Function simulates periodical Refresh portion of Data Warehouse by adding new sales and deleting old sales data. Parallel DML (parallel insert and delete in this case) and database log performance are a key for this function and the SPARC T4-4 server outperformed both HP Superdome 2 and IBM POWER7 servers.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH are trademarks of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). For more information, see www.tpc.org. SPARC T4-4 201,487 QphH@1000GB, $4.60/QphH@1000GB, avail 10/30/2011, 4 processors, 32 cores, 256 threads; SPARC Enterprise M8000 209,533.6 QphH@1000GB, $9.53/QphH@1000GB, avail 09/22/11, 16 processors, 64 cores, 128 threads; IBM Power 780 QphH@1000GB, 164,747.2 QphH@1000GB, $6.85/QphH@1000GB, avail 03/31/11, 8 processors, 32 cores, 128 threads; HP Integrity Superdome 2 140,181.1 QphH@1000GB, $12.15/QphH@1000GB avail 10/20/10, 16 processors, 64, cores, 64 threads.

Friday Jun 03, 2011

SPARC Enterprise M8000 with Oracle 11g Beats IBM POWER7 on TPC-H @1000GB Benchmark

Oracle's SPARC Enterprise M8000 server configured with SPARC64 VII+ processors, Oracle's Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array storage, Oracle Solaris, and Oracle Database 11g Release 2 achieved a TPC-H performance result of 209,533 QphH@1000GB with price/performance of $9.53/QphH@1000GB.

Oracle's SPARC server surpasses the performance of the IBM POWER7 server on the 1 TB TPC-H decision support benchmark.

Oracle focuses on the performance of the complete hardware and software stack. Implementation details such as the number of cores or the number of threads obscures the important metric of delivered system performance. The SPARC Enterprise M8000 server delivers higher performance than the IBM Power 780 even though the SPARC VII+ processor-core is 1.6x slower than the POWER7 processor-core.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M8000 server is 27% faster than the IBM Power 780. IBM's reputed single-thread performance leadership does not provide benefit for throughput.

  • Oracle beats IBM Power with better performance. This shows that Oracle's focus on integrated system design provides more customer value than IBM's focus on per core performance.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M8000 server is up to 3.8 times faster than the IBM Power 780 for Refresh Function. Again, IBM's reputed single-thread performance leadership does not provide benefit for this important function.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M8000 server is 49% faster than the HP Superdome 2 (1.73 GHz Itanium 9350).

  • The SPARC Enterprise M8000 server is 22% better price performance than the HP Superdome 2 (1.73 GHz Itanium 9350).

  • The SPARC Enterprise M8000 server is 2 times faster than the HP Superdome 2 (1.73 GHz Itanium 9350) for Refresh Function.

  • Oracle used Storage Redundancy Level 3 as defined by the TPC-H 2.14.0 specification which is the highest level.

  • One should focus on the performance of the complete hardware and software stack since server implementation details such as the number of cores or the number of threads obscures the important metric of delivered system performance.

  • This TPC-H result demonstrates that the SPARC Enterprise M8000 server can handle the increasingly large databases required of DSS systems. The server delivered more than 16 GB/sec of IO throughput through Oracle Database 11g Release 2 software maintaining high cpu load.

Performance Landscape

The table below lists published results from comparable enterprise class systems from Oracle, HP and IBM. Each system was configured with 512 GB of memory.

TPC-H @1000GB

System
CPU type
Proc/Core/Thread
Composite
(QphH)
$/perf
($/QphH)
Power
(QppH)
Throughput
(QthH)
Database Available
SPARC Enterprise M8000
3 GHz SPARC64 VII+
16 / 64 / 128
209,533.6 $9.53 177,845.9 246,867.2 Oracle 11g 09/22/11
IBM Power 780
4.14 GHz POWER7
8 / 32 / 128
164,747.2 $6.85 170,206.4 159,463.1 Sybase 03/31/11
HP SuperDome 2
1.73 GHz Intel Itanium 9350
16 / 64 / 64
140,181.1 $12.15 139,181.0 141,188.3 Oracle 11g 10/20/10

QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better)
$/QphH = the Price/Performance metric (smaller is better)
QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity
QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity

Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org.

Configuration Summary and Results

Server:

SPARC Enterprise M8000 server
16 x SPARC64 VII+ 3.0 GHz processors (total of 64 cores, 128 threads)
512 GB memory
12 x internal SAS (12 x 300 GB) disk drives

External Storage:

4 x Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array device, each with
80 x 24 GB Flash Modules

Software:

Oracle Solaris 10 8/11
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition

Audited Results:

Database Size: 1000 GB (Scale Factor 3000)
TPC-H Composite: 209,533.6 QphH@1000GB
Price/performance: $9.53/QphH@1000GB
Available: 09/22/2011
Total 3 year Cost: $1,995,715
TPC-H Power: 177,845.9
TPC-H Throughput: 246,867.2
Database Load Time: 1:27:12

Benchmark Description

The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB and 10000GB) are not allowed by the TPC.

TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system.

The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric (QphH@SF, where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). QphH@SF is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multi user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of QphH to total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • Four Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array devices were used for the benchmark. Each F5100 device contains 80 Flash Modules (FMODs). Twenty (20) FMODs from each F5100 device were connected to a single SAS 6 Gb HBA. A single F5100 device showed 4.16 GB/sec for sequential read and demonstrated linear scaling of 16.62 GB/sec with 4 x F5100 devices.
  • The IO rate from the Oracle database was over 16 GB/sec.
  • Oracle Solaris 10 8/11 required very little system tuning.
  • The SPARC Enterprise M8000 server and Oracle Solaris efficiently managed the system load of over one thousand Oracle parallel processes.
  • The Oracle database files were mirrored under Solaris Volume Manager (SVM). Two F5100 arrays were mirrored to another 2 F5100 arrays. IO performance was good and balanced across all the FMODs. Because of the SVM mirror one of the durability tests, the disk/controller failure test, was transparent to the Oracle database.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

SPARC Enterprise M8000 209,533.6 QphH@1000GB, $9.53/QphH@1000GB, avail 09/22/11, IBM Power 780 QphH@1000GB, 164,747.2 QphH@1000GB, $6.85/QphH@1000GB, avail 03/31/11, HP Integrity Superdome 2 140,181.1 QphH@1000GB, $12.15/QphH@1000GB avail 10/20/10, TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH tm of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). More info www.tpc.org.

Friday Mar 25, 2011

SPARC Enterprise M9000 with Oracle Database 11g Delivers World Record Single Server TPC-H @3000GB Result

Oracle's SPARC Enterprise M9000 server delivers single-system TPC-H @3000GB world record performance. The SPARC Enterprise M9000 server along with Oracle's Sun Storage 6180 arrays and running Oracle Database 11g Release 2 on the Oracle Solaris operating system proves the power of Oracle's integrated solution.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M9000 server configured with SPARC64 VII+ processors, Sun Storage 6180 arrays and running Oracle Solaris 10 combined with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 achieved World Record TPC-H performance of 386,478.3 QphH@3000GB for non-clustered systems.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M9000 server running the Oracle Database 11g Release 2 software is 2.5 times faster than the IBM p595 (POWER6) server which ran with Sybase IQ v.15.1 database software.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 3.4 times faster than the IBM p595 server for data loading.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 3.5 times faster than the IBM p595 server for Refresh Function.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M9000 server configured with Sun Storage 6180 arrays shows linear scaling up to the maximum delivered IO performance of 48.3 GB/sec as measured by vdbench.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M9000 server running the Oracle Database 11g Release 2 software is 2.4 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 server which used Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Enterprise Edition software.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 2.9 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 server for data loading.

  • The SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 4 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 server for Refresh Function.

  • A 1.94x improvement was delivered by the SPARC Enterprise M9000 server result using 64 SPARC64 VII+ processors compared to the previous Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server result which used 32 SPARC64 VII processes.

  • Oracle's TPC-H result shows that the SPARC Enterprise M9000 server can handle the increasingly large databases required of DSS systems. The IO rate as measured by the Oracle database is over 40 GB/sec.

  • Oracle used Storage Redundancy Level 3 as defined by the TPC-H 2.14.0 specification which is the highest level.

Performance Landscape

TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems

System
CPU type
Memory
Composite
(QphH)
$/perf
($/QphH)
Power
(QppH)
Throughput
(QthH)
Database Available
SPARC Enterprise M9000
3 GHz SPARC64 VII+
1024 GB
386,478.3 $18.19 316,835.8 471,428.6 Oracle 11g 09/22/11
Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000
2.88 GHz SPARC64 VII
512 GB
198,907.5 $15.27 182,350.7 216,967.7 Oracle 11g 12/09/10
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560
512 GB
162,601.7 $2.68 185,297.7 142,601.7 SQL Server 10/13/10
IBM Power 595
5.0 GHz POWER6
512 GB
156,537.3 $20.60 142,790.7 171,607.4 Sybase 11/24/09

QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better)
$/QphH = the Price/Performance metric (smaller is better)
QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity
QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity

Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org.

Configuration Summary and Results

Server:

SPARC Enterprise M9000
64 x SPARC VII+ 3.0 GHz processors
1024 GB memory
4 x internal SAS (4 x 146 GB)

External Storage:

32 x Sun Storage 6180 arrays (each with 16 x 600 GB)

Software:

Oracle Solaris 10 9/10
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition

Audited Results:

Database Size: 3000 GB (Scale Factor 3000)
TPC-H Composite: 386,478.3 QphH@3000GB
Price/performance: $18.19/QphH@3000GB
Available: 09/22/2011
Total 3 year Cost: $7,030,009
TPC-H Power: 316,835.8
TPC-H Throughput: 471,428.6
Database Load Time: 2:59:01

Benchmark Description

The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB and 10000GB) are not allowed by the TPC.

TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system.

The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric (QphH@SF, where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). QphH@SF is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multi user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of QphH to total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • The Sun Storage 6180 array showed linear scalability of 48.3 GB/sec Sequential Read with thirty-two Sun Storage 6180 arrays. Scaling could continue if there are more arrays available.
  • Oracle Solaris 10 9/10 required very little system tuning.
  • The optimal Sun Storage 6180 arrays configuration for the benchmark was to set up 1 disk per volume instead of multiple disks per volume and let Oracle Oracle Automatic Storage Management (ASM) mirror. Presenting as many volumes as possible to Oracle database gave the highest scan rate.

  • The storage was managed by ASM with 4 MB stripe size. 1 MB is the default stripe size but 4 MB works better for large databases.

  • All the Oracle database files, except TEMP tablespace, were mirrored under ASM. 16 x Sun Storage 6180 arrays (256 disks) were mirrored to another 16 x Sun Storage 6180 arrays using ASM. IO performance was good and balanced across all the disks. With the ASM mirror the benchmark passed the ACID (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation and Durablity) test.

  • Oracle database tables were 256-way partitioned. The parallel degree for each table was set to 256 to match the number of available cores. This setting worked the best for performance.

  • Oracle Database 11g Release 2 feature Automatic Parallel Degree Policy was set to AUTO for the benchmark. This enabled automatic degree of parallelism, statement queuing and in-memory parallel execution.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

SPARC Enterprise M9000 386,478.3 QphH@3000GB, $18.19/QphH@3000GB, avail 09/22/11, IBM Power 595 QphH@3000GB, 156,537.3 QphH@3000GB, $20.60/QphH@3000GB, avail 11/24/09, HP ProLiant DL980 G7 162,601.7 QphH@3000GB, $2.68/QphH@3000GB avail 10/13/10, TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH tm of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). More info www.tpc.org.

Monday Oct 11, 2010

Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 Server Delivers World Record Non-Clustered TPC-H @3000GB Performance

Oracle's Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server delivered a single-system TPC-H 3000GB world record performance. The Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server, running Oracle Database 11g Release 2 on the Oracle Solaris operating system proves the power of Oracle's integrated solution.

  • Oracle beats IBM Power with better performance and price/performance (3 Year TCO). This shows that Oracle's focus on integrated system design provides more customer value than IBM's focus on "per core performance"!

  • The Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 27% faster than the IBM Power 595.

  • The Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 22% faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7.

  • The Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 26% lower than the IBM Power 595 for price/performance.

  • The Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 2.7 times faster than the IBM Power 595 for data loading.

  • The Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 2.3 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 for data loading.

  • The Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 2.6 times faster than the IBM p595 for Refresh Function.

  • The Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is 3 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 for Refresh Function.

  • Oracle used Storage Redundancy Level 3 as defined by the TPC-H 2.12.0 specification, which is the highest level. IBM is the only other vendor to secure the storage to this level.

  • One should focus on the performance of the complete hardware and software stack since server implementation details such as the number of cores or the number of threads will obscure the important metrics of delivered system performance and system price/performance.

  • The Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server configured with SPARC VII processors, Sun Storage 6180 arrays, and running Oracle Solaris 10 operating system combined with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 achieved World Record TPC-H performance of 198,907.5 QphH@3000GB for non-clustered systems.

  • The Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server is over three times faster than the HP Itanium2 Superdome.

  • The Sun Storage 6180 array configuration (a total of 16 6180 arrays) in this benchmark delivered IO performance of over 21 GB/sec Sequential Read performance as measured by the vdbench tool.

  • This TPC-H result demonstrates that the Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server can handle the increasingly large databases required of DSS systems. The server delivered more than 18 GB/sec of real IO throughput as measured by the Oracle Database 11g Release 2 software.

  • Both Oracle and IBM had the same level of hardware discounting as allowed by TPC rules to provide a effective comparison of price/performance.

  • IBM has not shown any delivered I/O performance results for the high-end IBM POWER7 systems. In addition, they have not delivered any commercial benchmarks (TPC-C, TPC-H, etc.) which have heavy I/O demands.

Performance Landscape

TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems

System
CPU type
Memory
Composite
(QphH)
$/perf
($/QphH)
Power
(QppH)
Throughput
(QthH)
Database Available
Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000
2.88GHz SPARC64 VII
512GB
198,907.5 $15.27 182,350.7 216,967.7 Oracle 12/09/10
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.27GHz Intel Xeon X7560
512GB
162,601.7 $2.68 185,297.7 142,601.7 SQL Server 10/13/10
IBM Power 595
5.0GHz POWER6
512GB
156,537.3 $20.60 142,790.7 171,607.4 Sybase 11/24/09
Unisys ES7000 7600R
2.6GHz Intel Xeon
1024GB
102,778.2 $21.05 120,254.8 87,841.4 SQL Server 05/06/10
HP Integrity Superdome
1.6GHz Intel Itanium
256GB
60,359.3 $32.60 80,838.3 45,068.3 SQL Server 05/21/07

QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better)
$/QphH = the Price/Performance metric (smaller is better)
QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity
QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity

Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org.

Configuration Summary and Results

Server:

Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000
32 x SPARC VII 2.88 GHz processors
512 GB memory
4 x internal SAS (4 x 300 GB)

External Storage:

16 x Sun Storage 6180 arrays (16x 16 x 300 GB)

Software:

Operating System: Oracle Solaris 10 10/09
Database: Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition

Audited Results:

Database Size: 3000 GB (Scale Factor 3000)
TPC-H Composite: 198,907.5 QphH@3000GB
Price/performance: $15.27/QphH@3000GB
Available: 12/09/2010
Total 3 year Cost: $3,037,900
TPC-H Power: 182,350.7
TPC-H Throughput: 216,967.7
Database Load Time: 3:40:11

Benchmark Description

The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB and 10000GB) are not allowed by the TPC.

TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system.

The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric (QphH@SF, where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). QphH@SF is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multi user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of QphH to total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • The Sun Storage 6180 array showed good scalability and these sixteen 6180 arrays showed over 21 GB/sec Sequential Read performance as measured by the vdbench tool.
  • Oracle Solaris 10 10/09 required little system tuning.
  • The optimal 6180 configuration for the benchmark was to set up 1 disk per volume instead of multiple disks per volume and let Oracle Solaris Volume Manager (SVM) mirror. Presenting as many volumes as possible to Oracle database gave the highest scan rate.

  • The storage was managed by SVM with 1MB stripe size to match with Oracle's database IO size. The default 16K stripe size is just too small for this DSS benchmark.

  • All the Oracle files, except TEMP tablespace, were mirrored under SVM. Eight 6180 arrays (128 disks) were mirrored to another 8 6180 arrays using 128-way stripe. IO performance was good and balanced across all the disks with a round robin order. Read performance was the same with mirror or without mirror. With the SVM mirror the benchmark passed the ACID (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation and Durablity) test.

  • Oracle tables were 128-way partitioned and parallel degree for each table was set to 128 because the system had 128 cores. This setting worked the best for performance.

  • CPU usage during the Power run was not so high. This is because parallel degree was set to 128 for the tables and indexes so it utilized 128 vcpus for the most of the queries but the system had 256 vcpus.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 198,907.5 QphH@3000GB, $15.27/QphH@3000GB, avail 12/09/10, IBM Power 595 QphH@3000GB, 156,537.3 QphH@3000GB, $20.60/QphH@3000GB, avail 11/24/09, HP Integrity Superdome 60,359.3 QphH@3000GB, $32.60/QphH@3000GB avail 06/18/07, TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH tm of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). More info www.tpc.org.

Tuesday May 11, 2010

Per-core Performance Myth Busting

IBM continually touts "performance per core" in sales and marketing messages.  IBM implies that higher performance per core will somehow deliver better customer experience.

Oracle's "Optimized System Performance"  vs. IBM's "Per-core Performance Focus"

Customers care about system performance and the ROI of their solution.  Does better "per-core performance" predict better system performance or price/performance?  No, is the simple answer.

Modern server & CPU designers can make various trade-offs on complexity, performance and number of threads & cores.  The best way to address these trade-offs is to look at the integrated system design.

Below are two examples where better "system design" is far more important than a focus on "per-core" performance:

  • Oracle's Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 server delivered a single-system TPC-H 3000GB world record.
    • beats IBM's Power 595 performance by 20%
    • beats IBM's Power 595 price/performance (3 year TCO: hardware, software, maintenance, etc.)
    • Oracle database load time(4hr 45min) was over 2 times faster than IBM (10hr 2min)!
    For TPC-H, IBM used half the number of cores, but could not deliver better customer value.
  • Oracle's 12-node Sun SPARC Enterprise T5440 server cluster delivered a TPC-C world record.
    • beats IBM's Power 595 (5GHz) with IBM DB2 9.5 database performance by 26%
    • beats IBM's IBM's Power 595 price/performance (3 year TCO: hardware, software, maintenance, etc.) by 16%
    • in addition with the Oracle solution one also has better response time, Oracle's New Order response time was 7.3x faster than IBM!
    For TPC-C, IBM used one-sixth the number of cores, but could not deliver better customer value.

In conclusion, Better ROI is achieved with Oracle's Integrated System design.


Required Disclosure statements:

Sun SPARC Enterprise M9000 (32 procs, 128 cores, 128 threads) 188,229.9 QphH@3000GB, $20.19/QphH@3000GB, database load time 4:43:25, avail 04/10/10.  IBM Power 595 (32 procs, 64 cores, 128 threads) QphH@3000GB, 156,537.3 QphH@3000GB, $20.60/QphH@3000GB, database load time 10:02:25, avail 11/24/09. TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH tm of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). More info www.tpc.org
http://blogs.sun.com/BestPerf/tags/tpc-h

12-node Sun SPARC Enterprise T5440 Cluster (12 nodes, 48 procs, 384 cores, 3072 threads) with Oracle 11g Enterprise Edition with Real Application Clusters and Partitioning, 7,646,486.7 tpmC, $2.36/tpmC, response time new order average 0.168, Available 3/19/10. IBM Power 595 (5GHz Power6, 32 chips, 64 cores, 128 threads) with IBM DB2 9.5, 6,085,166 tpmC, $2.81/tpmC, response time new order average 1.22, available 12/10/08. TPC Benchmark C, tpmC, and TPC-C are trademarks of the Transaction Performance Processing Council (TPC), source: www.tpc.org, results as of 11/5/09.
http://blogs.sun.com/BestPerf/tags/tpc-c

Friday Jul 10, 2009

World Record TPC-H@300GB Price-Performance for Windows on Sun Fire X4600 M2

Significance of Results

Sun and Microsoft combined to deliver World Record price performance for Windows based results on the TPC-H benchmark at the 300GB scale factor. Using Microsoft's SQL Server 2008 Enterprise database along with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 operating system on the Sun Fire X4600 M2 server, the result of 2.80 $/QphH@300GB (USD) was delivered.

  • The Sun Fire X4600 M2 provides World Record price-performance of 2.80 $/QphH@300GB (USD) among Windows based TPC-H results at the 300GB scale factor. This result is 14% better price performance than the HP DL785 result.
  • The Sun Fire X4600 M2 trails HP's World Record single system performance (HP: 57,684 QphH@300GB, Sun: 55,185 QphH@300GB) by less than 5%.
  • The Sun/SQL Server solution used fewer disks for the database (168) than the other top performance leaders @300GB.
  • IBM required 79% more disks (300 total) than Sun to get a result of 46,034 QphH@300GB which is 20% below Sun's QphH.
  • HP required 21% more disks (204 total) than Sun to achieve a result of 3.24 $/QphH@300GB (USD) which is 16% worse than Sun's price performance.

This is Sun's first published TPC-H SQL Server benchmark.

Performance Landscape

ch/co/th = chips, cores, threads
$/QphH = TPC-H Price/Performance metric (smaller is better)

System ch/co/th Processor Database QphH $/QphH Price Disks Available
Sun Fire X4600 M2 8/32/32 2.7 Opteron 8384 SQL Server 2008 55,158 2.80 $154,284 168 07/06/09
HP DL785 8/32/32 2.7 Opteron 8384 SQL Server 2008 57,684 3.24 $186,700 204 11/17/08
IBM x3950 M2 8/32/32 2.93 Intel X7350 SQL Server 2005 46,034 5.40 $248,635 300 03/07/08

Complete benchmark results may be found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org.

Results and Configuration Summary

Server:

    Sun Fire X4600 M2 with:
      8 x AMD Opteron 8384, 2.7 GHz QC processors
      256 GB memory
      3 x 73GB (15K RPM) internal SAS disks

Storage:

    14 x Sun Storage J4200 each consisting of 12 x 146GB 15,000 RPM SAS disks

Software:

    Operating System: Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Enterprise x64 Edition SP1
    Database Manager: SQL Server 2008 Enterprise x64 Edition SP1

Audited Results:

    Database Size: 300GB (Scale Factor)
    TPC-H Composite: 55,157.5 QphH@300GB
    Price/performance: $2.80 / QphH@300GB (USD)
    Available: July 6, 2009
    Total 3 Year Cost: $154,284.19 (USD)
    TPC-H Power: 67,095.6
    TPC-H Throughput: 45,343.5
    Database Load Time: 17 hours 29 minutes
    Storage Ratio: 76.82

Benchmark Description

The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB and 10000GB) are not allowed by the TPC.

TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system.

The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric (QphH@SF, where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). QphH@SF is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multi user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of QphH to total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance. A secondary metric is the storage efficiency, which is the ratio of total configured disk space in GB to the scale factor.

Key Points and Best Practices

SQL Server 2008 is able to take advantage of the lower latency local memory access provides on the Sun Fire 4600 M2 server. This was achieved by setting the NUMA initialization parameter to enable all NUMA optimizations.

Enabling the Windows large-page feature provided a significant performance improvement. Because SQL Server 2008 manages its own memory buffer, the use of large-pages resulted in significant performance increase. Note that to use large-pages, an application must be part of the large-page group of the OS (Windows).

The 64-bit Windows OS and 64-bit SQL Server software were able to utilize the 256GB of memory available on the Sun Fire 4600 M2 server.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

TPC-H@300GB: Sun Fire X4600 M2 55,158 QphH@300GB, $2.80/QphH@300GB, availability 7/6/09; HP DL785, 57,684 QphH@300GB, $3.24/QphH@300GB, availability 11/17/08; IBM x3950 M2, 46,034 QphH@300GB, $5.40/QphH@300GB, availability 03/07/08; TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH tm of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). More info www.tpc.org.

Monday Jun 08, 2009

Variety of benchmark results to be posted on BestPerf

Last Friday, Chris posted SPECpower results on our new group blog BestPerf called "Interpreting Sun's SPECpower_ssj2008 Publications", it is well worth a read.

In the coming days you will see a wide variety of other results posted, these may include: speccpu, specfp, specint, specjappserver, specweb, specjbb, specomp, specpower, specjvm, specmail, speccpu, igen, Ansys, Nastran, sap-sd, Siebel, peoplesoft, TPC-C, TPC-E, TPC-H, etc.

About

BestPerf is the source of Oracle performance expertise. In this blog, Oracle's Strategic Applications Engineering group explores Oracle's performance results and shares best practices learned from working on Enterprise-wide Applications.

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