Monday Nov 25, 2013

World Record Single System TPC-H @10000GB Benchmark on SPARC T5-4

Oracle's SPARC T5-4 server delivered world record single server performance of 377,594 QphH@10000GB with price/performance of $4.65/QphH@10000GB USD on the TPC-H @10000GB benchmark. This result shows that the 4-chip SPARC T5-4 server is significantly faster than the 8-chip server results from HP (Intel x86 based).

  • The SPARC T5-4 server with four SPARC T5 processors is 2.4 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with eight x86 processors.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server delivered 4.8 times better performance per chip and 3.0 times better performance per core than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server has 28% better price/performance than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server (for the price/QphH metric).

  • The SPARC T5-4 server with 2 TB memory is 2.4 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with 4 TB memory (for the composite metric).

  • The SPARC T5-4 server took 9 hours, 37 minutes, 54 seconds for data loading while the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server took 8.3 times longer.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server accomplished the refresh function in around a minute, the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server took up to 7.1 times longer to do the same function.

This result demonstrates a complete data warehouse solution that shows the performance both of individual and concurrent query processing streams, faster loading, and refresh of the data during business operations. The SPARC T5-4 server delivers superior performance and cost efficiency when compared to the HP result.

Performance Landscape

The table lists the leading TPC-H @10000GB results for non-clustered systems.

TPC-H @10000GB, Non-Clustered Systems
System
Processor
P/C/T – Memory
Composite
(QphH)
$/perf
($/QphH)
Power
(QppH)
Throughput
(QthH)
Database Available
SPARC T5-4
3.6 GHz SPARC T5
4/64/512 – 2048 GB
377,594.3 $4.65 342,714.1 416,024.4 Oracle 11g R2 11/25/13
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E7-4870
8/80/160 – 4096 GB
158,108.3 $6.49 185,473.6 134,780.5 SQL Server 2012 04/15/13

P/C/T = Processors, Cores, Threads
QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better)
$/QphH = the Price/Performance metric in USD (smaller is better)
QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity (bigger is better)
QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity (bigger is better)

The following table lists data load times and average refresh function times.

TPC-H @10000GB, Non-Clustered Systems
Database Load & Database Refresh
System
Processor
Data Loading
(h:m:s)
T5
Advan
RF1
(sec)
T5
Advan
RF2
(sec)
T5
Advan
SPARC T5-4
3.6 GHz SPARC T5
09:37:54 8.3x 58.8 7.1x 62.1 6.4x
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E7-4870
79:28:23 1.0x 416.4 1.0x 394.9 1.0x

Data Loading = database load time
RF1 = throughput average first refresh transaction
RF2 = throughput average second refresh transaction
T5 Advan = the ratio of time to the SPARC T5-4 server time

Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org.

Configuration Summary and Results

Server Under Test:

SPARC T5-4 server
4 x SPARC T5 processors (3.6 GHz total of 64 cores, 512 threads)
2 TB memory
2 x internal SAS (2 x 300 GB) disk drives
12 x 16 Gb FC HBA

External Storage:

24 x Sun Server X4-2L servers configured as COMSTAR nodes, each with
2 x 2.5 GHz Intel Xeon E5-2609 v2 processors
4 x Sun Flash Accelerator F80 PCIe Cards, 800 GB each
6 x 4 TB 7.2K RPM 3.5" SAS disks
1 x 8 Gb dual port HBA

2 x 48 port Brocade 6510 Fibre Channel Switches

Software Configuration:

Oracle Solaris 11.1
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition

Audited Results:

Database Size: 10000 GB (Scale Factor 10000)
TPC-H Composite: 377,594.3 QphH@10000GB
Price/performance: $4.65/QphH@10000GB USD
Available: 11/25/2013
Total 3 year Cost: $1,755,709 USD
TPC-H Power: 342,714.1
TPC-H Throughput: 416,024.4
Database Load Time: 9:37:54

Benchmark Description

The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB, 10000GB, 30000GB and 100000GB) are not allowed by the TPC.

TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system.

The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric (QphH@SF, where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). QphH@SF is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multiple user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of the total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance to the QphH. A secondary metric is the storage efficiency, which is the ratio of total configured disk space in GB to the scale factor.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • COMSTAR (Common Multiprotocol SCSI Target) is the software framework that enables an Oracle Solaris host to serve as a SCSI Target platform. COMSTAR uses a modular approach to break the huge task of handling all the different pieces in a SCSI target subsystem into independent functional modules which are glued together by the SCSI Target Mode Framework (STMF). The modules implementing functionality at SCSI level (disk, tape, medium changer etc.) are not required to know about the underlying transport. And the modules implementing the transport protocol (FC, iSCSI, etc.) are not aware of the SCSI-level functionality of the packets they are transporting. The framework hides the details of allocation providing execution context and cleanup of SCSI commands and associated resources and simplifies the task of writing the SCSI or transport modules.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server achieved a peak IO rate of 37 GB/sec from the Oracle database configured with this storage.

  • Twelve COMSTAR nodes were mirrored to another twelve COMSTAR nodes on which all of the Oracle database files were placed. IO performance was high and balanced across all the nodes.

  • Oracle Solaris 11.1 required very little system tuning.

  • Some vendors try to make the point that storage ratios are of customer concern. However, storage ratio size has more to do with disk layout and the increasing capacities of disks – so this is not an important metric when comparing systems.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server and Oracle Solaris efficiently managed the system load of nearly two thousand Oracle Database parallel processes.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

TPC Benchmark, TPC-H, QphH, QthH, QppH are trademarks of the Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). Results as of 11/25/13, prices are in USD. SPARC T5-4 www.tpc.org/3293; HP ProLiant DL980 G7 www.tpc.org/3285.

Wednesday Sep 25, 2013

SPARC T5-8 Delivers World Record Oracle OLAP Perf Version 3 Benchmark Result on Oracle Database 12c

Oracle's SPARC T5-8 server delivered world record query performance for systems running Oracle Database 12c for the Oracle OLAP Perf Version 3 benchmark.

  • The query throughput on the SPARC T5-8 server is 1.7x higher than that of an 8-chip Intel Xeon E7-8870 server. Both systems had sub-second average response times.

  • The SPARC T5-8 server with the Oracle Database demonstrated the ability to support at least 700 concurrent users querying OLAP cubes (with no think time), processing 2.33 million analytic queries per hour with an average response time of less than 1 second per query. This performance was enabled by keeping the entire cube in-memory utilizing the 4 TB of memory on the SPARC T5-8 server.

  • Assuming a 60 second think time between query requests, the SPARC T5-8 server can support approximately 39,450 concurrent users with the same sub-second response time.

  • The workload uses a set of realistic Business Intelligence (BI) queries that run against an OLAP cube based on a 4 billion row fact table of sales data. The 4 billion rows are partitioned by month spanning 10 years.

  • The combination of the Oracle Database 12cwith the Oracle OLAP option running on a SPARC T5-8 server supports live data updates occurring concurrently with minimally impacted user query executions.

Performance Landscape

Oracle OLAP Perf Version 3 Benchmark
Oracle cube base on 4 billion fact table rows
10 years of data partitioned by month
System Queries/
hour
Users Average Response
Time (sec)
0 sec think time 60 sec think time
SPARC T5-8 2,329,000 700 39,450 <1 sec
8-chip Intel Xeon E7-8870 1,354,000 120 22,675 <1 sec

Configuration Summary

SPARC T5-8:

1 x SPARC T5-8 server with
8 x SPARC T5 processors, 3.6 GHz
4 TB memory
Data Storage and Redo Storage
Flash Storage
Oracle Solaris 11.1 (11.1.8.2.0)
Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.1) with Oracle OLAP option

Sun Server X2-8:

1 x Sun Server X2-8 with
8 x Intel Xeon E7-8870 processors, 2.4 GHz
1 TB memory
Data Storage and Redo Storage
Flash Storage
Oracle Solaris 10 10/12
Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.1) with Oracle OLAP option

Benchmark Description

The Oracle OLAP Perf Version 3 benchmark is a workload designed to demonstrate and stress the ability of the OLAP Option to deliver fast query, near real-time updates and rich calculations using a multi-dimensional model in the context of the Oracle data warehousing.

The bulk of the benchmark entails running a number of concurrent users, each issuing typical multidimensional queries against an Oracle cube. The cube has four dimensions: time, product, customer, and channel. Each query user issues approximately 150 different queries. One query chain may ask for total sales in a particular region (e.g South America) for a particular time period (e.g. Q4 of 2010) followed by additional queries which drill down into sales for individual countries (e.g. Chile, Peru, etc.) with further queries drilling down into individual stores, etc. Another query chain may ask for yearly comparisons of total sales for some product category (e.g. major household appliances) and then issue further queries drilling down into particular products (e.g. refrigerators, stoves. etc.), particular regions, particular customers, etc.

While the core of every OLAP Perf benchmark is real world query performance, the benchmark itself offers numerous execution options such as varying data set sizes, number of users, numbers of queries for any given user and cube update frequency. Version 3 of the benchmark is executed with a much larger number of query streams than previous versions and used a cube designed for near real-time updates. The results produced by version 3 of the benchmark are not directly comparable to results produced by previous versions of the benchmark.

The near real-time update capability is implemented along the following lines. A large Oracle cube, H, is built from a 4 billion row star schema, containing data up until the end of last business day. A second small cube, D, is then created which will contain all of today's new data coming in from outside the world. It will be updated every L minutes with the data coming in within the last L minutes. A third cube, R, joins cubes H and D for reporting purposes much like a view might join data from two tables. Calculations are installed into cube R. The use of a reporting cube which draws data from different storage cubes is a common practice.

Query users are never locked out of query operations while new data is added to the update cube. The point of the demonstration is to show that an Oracle OLAP system can be designed which results in data being no more than L minutes out of date, where L may be as low as just a few minutes. This is what is meant by near real-time analytics.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • Building and querying cubes with the Oracle OLAP option requires a large temporary tablespace. Normally temporary tablespaces would reside on disk storage. However, because the SPARC T5-8 server used in this benchmark had 4 TB of main memory, it was possible to use main memory for the OLAP temporary tablespace. This was accomplished by using a temporary, memory-based file system (TMPFS) for the temporary tablespace datafiles.

  • Since typical business intelligence users are often likely to issue similar queries, either with the same or different constants in the where clauses, setting the init.ora parameter "cursor_sharing" to "force" provides for additional query throughput and a larger number of potential users.

  • Assuming the normal Oracle Database initialization parameters (e.g. SGA, PGA, processes etc.) are appropriately set, out of the box performance for the Oracle OLAP workload should be close to what is reported here. Additional performance resulted from using memory for the OLAP temporary tablespace setting "cursor_sharing" to force.

  • Oracle OLAP Cube update performance was optimized by running update processes in the FX class with a priority greater than 0.

  • The maximum lag time between updates to the source fact table and data availability to query users (what was referred to as L in the benchmark description) was less than 3 minutes for the benchmark environment on the SPARC T5-8 server.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

Copyright 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. Results as of 09/22/2013.

Tuesday Sep 10, 2013

Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 Delivers World Record SPC-2 Performance

The Oracle Storage ZS3-4 storage system delivered a world record performance result for the SPC-2 benchmark along with excellent price-performance.

  • The Oracle Storage ZS3-4 storage system delivered an overall score of 17,244.22 SPC-2 MBPS™ and a SPC-2 price-performance of $22.53 on the SPC-2 benchmark.

  • This is over a 1.6X generational improvement in performance and over a 1.5X generational improvement in price-performance than over Oracle's Sun ZFS Storage 7420 SPC-2 Benchmark results.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 storage system has 6.8X better overall throughput and nearly 1.2X better price-performance than the IBM DS3524 Express turbo, which is IBM's best overall price-performance score on the SPC-2 benchmark.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 storage system has over 1.1X overall throughput and 5.8X better price-performance than the IBM DS8870, which is IBM's best overall performance score on the SPC-2 benchmark.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 storage system has over 1.3X overall throughput and 3.9X better price-performance than the HP StorageWorks P9500XP Disk Array on the SPC-2 benchmark.

Performance Landscape

SPC-2 Performance Chart (in decreasing performance order)

System SPC-2
MB/s
$/SPC-2
MB/s
ASU
Capacity
(GB)
TSC Price Data
Protection
Level
Date Results
Identifier
Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 17,244.22 $22.53 31,611 $388,472 Mirroring 09/10/13 B00067
Fujitsu DX8700 S2 16,039 $79.51 71,404 $1,275,163 Mirroring 12/03/12 B00063
IBM DS8870 15,424 $131.21 30,924 $2,023,742 RAID-5 10/03/12 B00062
IBM SAN VC v6.4 14,581 $129.14 74,492 $1,883,037 RAID-5 08/01/12 B00061
NEC Storage M700 14,409 $25.13 53,550 $361,613 Mirroring 08/19/12 B00066
Hitachi VSP 13,148 $95.38 129,112 $1,254,093 RAID-5 07/27/12 B00060
HP StorageWorks P9500 13,148 $88.34 129,112 $1,161,504 RAID-5 03/07/12 B00056
Sun ZFS Storage 7420 10,704 $35.24 31,884 $377,225 Mirroring 04/12/12 B00058
IBM DS8800 9,706 $270.38 71,537 $2,624,257 RAID-5 12/01/10 B00051
HP XP24000 8,725 $187.45 18,401 $1,635,434 Mirroring 09/08/08 B00035

SPC-2 MB/s = the Performance Metric
$/SPC-2 MB/s = the Price-Performance Metric
ASU Capacity = the Capacity Metric
Data Protection = Data Protection Metric
TSC Price = Total Cost of Ownership Metric
Results Identifier = A unique identification of the result Metric

SPC-2 Price-Performance Chart (in increasing price-performance order)

System SPC-2
MB/s
$/SPC-2
MB/s
ASU
Capacity
(GB)
TSC Price Data
Protection
Level
Date Results
Identifier
SGI InfiniteStorage 5600 8,855.70 $15.97 28,748 $141,393 RAID6 03/06/13 B00065
Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 17,244.22 $22.53 31,611 $388,472 Mirroring 09/10/13 B00067
Sun Storage J4200 548.80 $22.92 11,995 $12,580 Unprotected 07/10/08 B00033
NEC Storage M700 14,409 $25.13 53,550 $361,613 Mirroring 08/19/12 B00066
Sun Storage J4400 887.44 $25.63 23,965 $22,742 Unprotected 08/15/08 B00034
Sun StorageTek 2530 672.05 $26.15 1,451 $17,572 RAID5 08/16/07 B00026
Sun StorageTek 2530 663.51 $26.48 854 $17,572 Mirroring 08/16/07 B00025
Fujitsu ETERNUS DX80 1,357.55 $26.70 4,681 $36,247 Mirroring 03/15/10 B00050
IBM DS3524 Express Turbo 2,510 $26.76 14,374 $67,185 RAID-5 12/31/10 B00053
Fujitsu ETERNUS DX80 S2 2,685.50 $28.48 17,231 $76,475 Mirroring 08/19/11 B00055

SPC-2 MB/s = the Performance Metric
$/SPC-2 MB/s = the Price-Performance Metric
ASU Capacity = the Capacity Metric
Data Protection = Data Protection Metric
TSC Price = Total Cost of Ownership Metric
Results Identifier = A unique identification of the result Metric

Complete SPC-2 benchmark results may be found at http://www.storageperformance.org/results/benchmark_results_spc2.

Configuration Summary

Storage Configuration:

Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 storage system in clustered configuration
2 x Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 controllers, each with
4 x 2.4 GHz 10-core Intel Xeon processors
1024 GB memory
16 x Sun Disk shelves, each with
24 x 300 GB 15K RPM SAS-2 drives

Benchmark Description

SPC Benchmark-2 (SPC-2): Consists of three distinct workloads designed to demonstrate the performance of a storage subsystem during the execution of business critical applications that require the large-scale, sequential movement of data. Those applications are characterized predominately by large I/Os organized into one or more concurrent sequential patterns. A description of each of the three SPC-2 workloads is listed below as well as examples of applications characterized by each workload.

  • Large File Processing: Applications in a wide range of fields, which require simple sequential process of one or more large files such as scientific computing and large-scale financial processing.
  • Large Database Queries: Applications that involve scans or joins of large relational tables, such as those performed for data mining or business intelligence.
  • Video on Demand: Applications that provide individualized video entertainment to a community of subscribers by drawing from a digital film library.

SPC-2 is built to:

  • Provide a level playing field for test sponsors.
  • Produce results that are powerful and yet simple to use.
  • Provide value for engineers as well as IT consumers and solution integrators.
  • Is easy to run, easy to audit/verify, and easy to use to report official results.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

SPC-2 and SPC-2 MBPS are registered trademarks of Storage Performance Council (SPC). Results as of September 10, 2013, for more information see www.storageperformance.org. Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 B00067, Fujitsu ET 8700 S2 B00063, IBM DS8870 B00062, IBM S.V.C 6.4 B00061, NEC Storage M700 B00066, Hitachi VSP B00060, HP P9500 XP Disk Array B00056, IBM DS8800 B00051.

Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 Produces Best 2-Node Performance on SPECsfs2008 NFSv3

The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 storage system delivered world record two-node performance on the SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 benchmark, beating results published on NetApp's dual-controller and four-node high-end FAS6240 storage systems.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 storage system delivered a world record two-node result of 450,702 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec with an Overall Response Time (ORT) of 0.70 msec on the SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 benchmark.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 storage system delivered 2.4x higher throughput than the dual-controller NetApp FAS6240 and 4.5x higher throughput than the dual-controller NetApp FAS3270 on the SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 benchmark at less than half the list price of either result.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 storage system had 42 percent higher throughput than the four-node NetApp FAS6240 on the SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 benchmark.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 storage aystem has 54 percent better Overall Response Time than the 4-node NetApp FAS6240 on the SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 benchmark.

Performance Landscape

Two node results for SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 presented (in decreasing SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec order) along with other select results.

Sponsor System Nodes Disks Throughput
(Ops/sec)
Overall Response
Time (msec)
Oracle ZS3-4 2 464 450,702 0.70
IBM SONAS 1.2 2 1975 403,326 3.23
NetApp FAS6240 4 288 260,388 1.53
NetApp FAS6240 2 288 190,675 1.17
EMC VG8 312 135,521 1.92
Oracle 7320 2 136 134,140 1.51
EMC NS-G8 100 110,621 2.32
NetApp FAS3270 2 360 101,183 1.66

Throughput SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec — the Performance Metric
Overall Response Time — the corresponding Response Time Metric
Nodes — Nodes and Controllers are being used interchangeably

Complete SPECsfs2008 benchmark results may be found at http://www.spec.org/sfs2008/results/sfs2008.html.

Configuration Summary

Storage Configuration:

Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 storage system in clustered configuration
2 x Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 controllers, each with
8 x 2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E7-4870 processors
2 TB memory
2 x 10GbE NICs
20 x Sun Disk shelves
18 x shelves with 24 x 300 GB 15K RPM SAS-2 drives
2 x shelves with 20 x 300 GB 15K RPM SAS-2 drives and 8 x 73 GB SAS-2 flash-enabled write-cache

Benchmark Description

SPECsfs2008 is the latest version of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC) benchmark suite measuring file server throughput and response time, providing a standardized method for comparing performance across different vendor platforms. SPECsfs2008 results summarize the server's capabilities with respect to the number of operations that can be handled per second, as well as the overall latency of the operations. The suite is a follow-on to the SFS97_R1 benchmark, adding a CIFS workload, an updated NFSv3 workload, support for additional client platforms, and a new test harness and reporting/submission framework.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

SPEC and SPECsfs are registered trademarks of Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). Results as of September 10, 2013, for more information see www.spec.org. Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 Appliance 450,702 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec, 0.70 msec ORT, NetApp Data ONTAP 8.1 Cluster-Mode (4-node FAS6240) 260,388 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.53 msec ORT, NetApp FAS6240 190,675 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.17 msec ORT. NetApp FAS3270 101,183 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.66 msec ORT.

Nodes refer to the item in the SPECsfs2008 disclosed Configuration Bill of Materials that have the Processing Elements that perform the NFS Processing Function. These are the first item listed in each of disclosed Configuration Bill of Materials except for EMC where it is both the first and third items listed, and HP, where it is the second item listed as Blade Servers. The number of nodes is from the QTY disclosed in the Configuration Bill of Materials as described above. Configuration Bill of Materials list price for Oracle result of US$ 423,644. Configuration Bill of Materials list price for NetApp FAS3270 result of US$ 1,215,290. Configuration Bill of Materials list price for NetApp FAS6240 result of US$ 1,028,118. Oracle pricing from https://shop.oracle.com/pls/ostore/f?p=dstore:home:0, traverse to "Storage and Tape" and then to "NAS Storage". NetApp's pricing from http://www.netapp.com/us/media/na-list-usd-netapp-custom-state-new-discounts.html.

Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-2 Beats Comparable NetApp on SPECsfs2008 NFSv3

Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-2 storage system delivered outstanding performance on the SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 benchmark, beating results published on NetApp's fastest midrange platform, the NetApp FAS3270, the NetApp FAS6240 and the EMC Gateway NS-G8 Server Failover Cluster.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-2 storage system delivered 210,535 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec with an Overall Response Time (ORT) of 1.12 msec on the SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 benchmark.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-2 storage system delivered 10% higher throughput than the NetApp FAS6240 on the SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 benchmark.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-2 storage system has 52% higher throughput than the NetApp FAS3270 on the SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 benchmark.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-2 storage system has 5% better Overall Response Time than the NetApp FAS6240 on the SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 benchmark.

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-2 storage system has 33% better Overall Response Time than the NetApp FAS3270 on the SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 benchmark.

Performance Landscape

Results for SPECsfs2008 NFSv3 (in decreasing SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec order) for competitive systems.

Sponsor System Throughput
(Ops/sec)
Overall Response
Time (msec)
Oracle ZS3-2 210,535 1.12
NetApp FAS6240 190,675 1.17
EMC VG8 135,521 1.92
EMC NS-G8 110,621 2.32
NetApp FAS3270 101,183 1.66
NetApp FAS3250 100,922 1.76

Throughput SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec = the Performance Metric
Overall Response Time = the corresponding Response Time Metric

Complete SPECsfs2008 benchmark results may be found at http://www.spec.org/sfs2008/results/sfs2008.html.

Configuration Summary

Storage Configuration:

Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-2 storage system in clustered configuration
2 x Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-2 controllers, each with
4 x 2.1 GHz Intel Xeon E5-2658 processors
512 GB memory
8 x Sun Disk shelves
3 x shelves with 24 x 900 GB 10K RPM SAS-2 drives
3 x shelves with 20 x 900 GB 10K RPM SAS-2 drives
2 x shelves with 20 x 900 GB 10K RPM SAS-2 drives and 4 x 73 GB SAS-2 flash-enabled write-cache

Benchmark Description

SPECsfs2008 is the latest version of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC) benchmark suite measuring file server throughput and response time, providing a standardized method for comparing performance across different vendor platforms. SPECsfs2008 results summarize the server's capabilities with respect to the number of operations that can be handled per second, as well as the overall latency of the operations. The suite is a follow-on to the SFS97_R1 benchmark, adding a CIFS workload, an updated NFSv3 workload, support for additional client platforms, and a new test harness and reporting/submission framework.

 

See Also

Disclosure Statement

SPEC and SPECsfs are registered trademarks of Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). Results as of September 10, 2013, for more information see www.spec.org. Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-2 Appliance 210,535 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec, 1.12 msec ORT, NetApp FAS6240 190,675 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.17 msec ORT, EMC Celerra VG8 Server Failover Cluster, 2 Data Movers (1 stdby) / Symmetrix VMAX 135,521 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.92 msec ORT, EMC Celerra Gateway NS-G8 Server Failover Cluster, 3 Datamovers (1 stdby) / Symmetrix V-Max 110,621 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 2.32 msec ORT. NetApp FAS3270 101,183 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.66 msec ORT. NetApp FAS3250 100,922 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.76 msec ORT.

Wednesday Jun 12, 2013

SPARC T5-4 Produces World Record Single Server TPC-H @3000GB Benchmark Result

Oracle's SPARC T5-4 server delivered world record single server performance of 409,721 QphH@3000GB with price/performance of $3.94/QphH@3000GB on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark. This result shows that the 4-chip SPARC T5-4 server is significantly faster than the 8-chip server results from IBM (POWER7 based) and HP (Intel x86 based).

This result demonstrates a complete data warehouse solution that shows the performance both of individual and concurrent query processing streams, faster loading, and refresh of the data during business operations. The SPARC T5-4 server delivers superior performance and cost efficiency when compared to the IBM POWER7 result.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server with four SPARC T5 processors is 2.1 times faster than the IBM Power 780 server with eight POWER7 processors and 2.5 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with eight x86 processors on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark. The SPARC T5-4 server also delivered better performance per core than these eight processor systems from IBM and HP.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server with four SPARC T5 processors is 2.1 times faster than the IBM Power 780 server with eight POWER7 processors on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server costs 38% less per $/QphH@3000GB compared to the IBM Power 780 server with the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server took 2 hours, 6 minutes, 4 seconds for data loading while the IBM Power 780 server took 2.8 times longer.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server executed the first refresh function (RF1) in 19.4 seconds, the IBM Power 780 server took 7.6 times longer.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server with four SPARC T5 processors is 2.5 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with the same number of cores on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server took 2 hours, 6 minutes, 4 seconds for data loading while the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server took 4.1 times longer.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server executed the first refresh function (RF1) in 19.4 seconds, the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server took 8.9 times longer.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server delivered 6% better performance than the SPARC Enterprise M9000-64 server and 2.1 times better than the SPARC Enterprise M9000-32 server on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark.

Performance Landscape

The table lists the leading TPC-H @3000GB results for non-clustered systems.

TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems
System
Processor
P/C/T – Memory
Composite
(QphH)
$/perf
($/QphH)
Power
(QppH)
Throughput
(QthH)
Database Available
SPARC T5-4
3.6 GHz SPARC T5
4/64/512 – 2048 GB
409,721.8 $3.94 345,762.7 485,512.1 Oracle 11g R2 09/24/13
SPARC Enterprise M9000
3.0 GHz SPARC64 VII+
64/256/256 – 1024 GB
386,478.3 $18.19 316,835.8 471,428.6 Oracle 11g R2 09/22/11
SPARC T4-4
3.0 GHz SPARC T4
4/32/256 – 1024 GB
205,792.0 $4.10 190,325.1 222,515.9 Oracle 11g R2 05/31/12
SPARC Enterprise M9000
2.88 GHz SPARC64 VII
32/128/256 – 512 GB
198,907.5 $15.27 182,350.7 216,967.7 Oracle 11g R2 12/09/10
IBM Power 780
4.1 GHz POWER7
8/32/128 – 1024 GB
192,001.1 $6.37 210,368.4 175,237.4 Sybase 15.4 11/30/11
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560
8/64/128 – 512 GB
162,601.7 $2.68 185,297.7 142,685.6 SQL Server 2008 10/13/10

P/C/T = Processors, Cores, Threads
QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better)
$/QphH = the Price/Performance metric in USD (smaller is better)
QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity
QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity

The following table lists data load times and refresh function times during the power run.

TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems
Database Load & Database Refresh
System
Processor
Data Loading
(h:m:s)
T5
Advan
RF1
(sec)
T5
Advan
RF2
(sec)
T5
Advan
SPARC T5-4
3.6 GHz SPARC T5
02:06:04 1.0x 19.4 1.0x 22.4 1.0x
IBM Power 780
4.1 GHz POWER7
05:51:50 2.8x 147.3 7.6x 133.2 5.9x
HP ProLiant DL980 G7
2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560
08:35:17 4.1x 173.0 8.9x 126.3 5.6x

Data Loading = database load time
RF1 = power test first refresh transaction
RF2 = power test second refresh transaction
T5 Advan = the ratio of time to T5 time

Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org.

Configuration Summary and Results

Hardware Configuration:

SPARC T5-4 server
4 x SPARC T5 processors (3.6 GHz total of 64 cores, 512 threads)
2 TB memory
2 x internal SAS (2 x 300 GB) disk drives

External Storage:

12 x Sun Storage 2540-M2 array with Sun Storage 2501-M2 expansion trays, each with
24 x 15K RPM 300 GB drives, 2 controllers, 2 GB cache
2 x Brocade 6510 Fibre Channel Switches (48 x 16 Gbs port each)

Software Configuration:

Oracle Solaris 11.1
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition

Audited Results:

Database Size: 3000 GB (Scale Factor 3000)
TPC-H Composite: 409,721.8 QphH@3000GB
Price/performance: $3.94/QphH@3000GB
Available: 09/24/2013
Total 3 year Cost: $1,610,564
TPC-H Power: 345,762.7
TPC-H Throughput: 485,512.1
Database Load Time: 2:06:04

Benchmark Description

The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB, 10000GB, 30000GB and 100000GB) are not allowed by the TPC.

TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system.

The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric (QphH@SF, where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). QphH@SF is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multiple user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of the total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance to the QphH. A secondary metric is the storage efficiency, which is the ratio of total configured disk space in GB to the scale factor.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • Twelve of Oracle's Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays with Sun Storage 2501-M2 expansion trays were used for the benchmark. Each contains 24 15K RPM drives and is connected to a single dual port 16Gb FC HBA using 2 ports through a Brocade 6510 Fibre Channel switch.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server achieved a peak IO rate of 33 GB/sec from the Oracle database configured with this storage.

  • Oracle Solaris 11.1 required very little system tuning.

  • Some vendors try to make the point that storage ratios are of customer concern. However, storage ratio size has more to do with disk layout and the increasing capacities of disks – so this is not an important metric when comparing systems.

  • The SPARC T5-4 server and Oracle Solaris efficiently managed the system load of two thousand Oracle Database parallel processes.

  • Six Sun Storage 2540-M2/2501-M2 arrays were mirrored to another six Sun Storage 2540-M2/25001-M2 arrays on which all of the Oracle database files were placed. IO performance was high and balanced across all the arrays.

  • The TPC-H Refresh Function (RF) simulates periodical refresh portion of Data Warehouse by adding new sales and deleting old sales data. Parallel DML (parallel insert and delete in this case) and database log performance are a key for this function and the SPARC T5-4 server outperformed both the IBM POWER7 server and HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server. (See the RF columns above.)

See Also

Disclosure Statement

TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH are trademarks of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). For more information, see www.tpc.org, results as of 6/7/13. Prices are in USD. SPARC T5-4 www.tpc.org/3288; SPARC T4-4 www.tpc.org/3278; SPARC Enterprise M9000 www.tpc.org/3262; SPARC Enterprise M9000 www.tpc.org/3258; IBM Power 780 www.tpc.org/3277; HP ProLiant DL980 www.tpc.org/3285. 

Tuesday Mar 26, 2013

SPARC T5-8 Delivers Oracle OLAP World Record Performance

Oracle's SPARC T5-8 server delivered world record query performance with near real-time analytic capability using the Oracle OLAP Perf Version 3 workload running Oracle Database 11g Release 2 on Oracle Solaris 11.

  • The maximum query throughput on the SPARC T5-8 server is 1.6x higher than that of the 8-chip Intel Xeon E7-8870 server. Both systems had sub-second response time.

  • The SPARC T5-8 server with the Oracle Database demonstrated the ability to support at least 600 concurrent users querying OLAP cubes (with no think time), processing 2.93 million analytic queries per hour with an average response time of 0.66 seconds per query. This performance was enabled by keeping the entire cube in-memory utilizing the 4 TB of memory on the SPARC T5-8 server.

  • Assuming a 60 second think time between query requests, the SPARC T5-8 server can support approximately 49,450 concurrent users with the same 0.66 sec response time.

  • The SPARC T5-8 server delivered 4.3x times the maximum query throughput of a SPARC T4-4 server.

  • The workload uses a set of realistic BI queries that run against an OLAP cube based on a 4 billion row fact table of sales data. The 4 billion rows are partitioned by month spanning 10 years.

  • The combination of the Oracle Database with the Oracle OLAP option running on a SPARC T5-8 server supports live data updates occurring concurrently with minimally impacted user query executions.

Performance Landscape

Oracle OLAP Perf Version 3 Benchmark
Oracle cube base on 4 billion fact table rows
10 years of data partitioned by month
System Queries/
hour
Users* Average Response
Time (sec)
0 sec think time 60 sec think time
SPARC T5-8 2,934,000 600 49,450 0.66
8-chip Intel Xeon E7-8870 1,823,000 120 30,500 0.19
SPARC T4-4 686,500 150 11,580 0.71

Configuration Summary and Results

SPARC T5-8 Hardware Configuration:

1 x SPARC T5-8 server with
8 x SPARC T5 processors, 3.6 GHz
4 TB memory
Data Storage and Redo Storage
1 x Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array (with 80 FMODs)
Oracle Solaris 11.1
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.3) with Oracle OLAP option

Sun Server X2-8 Hardware Configuration:

1 x Sun Server X2-8 with
8 x Intel Xeon E7-8870 processors, 2.4 GHz
512 GB memory
Data Storage and Redo Storage
3 x StorageTek 2540/2501 array pairs
Oracle Solaris 10 10/12
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.2) with Oracle OLAP option

SPARC T4-4 Hardware Configuration:

1 x SPARC T4-4 server with
4 x SPARC T4 processors, 3.0 GHz
1 TB memory
Data Storage
1 x Sun Fire X4275 (using COMSTAR)
2 x Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array (each with 80 FMODs)
Redo Storage
1 x Sun Fire X4275 (using COMSTAR with 8 HDD)
Oracle Solaris 11 11/11
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.3) with Oracle OLAP option

Benchmark Description

The Oracle OLAP Perf Version 3 benchmark is a workload designed to demonstrate and stress the ability of the OLAP Option to deliver fast query, near real-time updates and rich calculations using a multi-dimensional model in the context of the Oracle data warehousing.

The bulk of the benchmark entails running a number of concurrent users, each issuing typical multidimensional queries against an Oracle cube. The cube has four dimensions: time, product, customer, and channel. Each query user issues approximately 150 different queries. One query chain may ask for total sales in a particular region (e.g South America) for a particular time period (e.g. Q4 of 2010) followed by additional queries which drill down into sales for individual countries (e.g. Chile, Peru, etc.) with further queries drilling down into individual stores, etc. Another query chain may ask for yearly comparisons of total sales for some product category (e.g. major household appliances) and then issue further queries drilling down into particular products (e.g. refrigerators, stoves. etc.), particular regions, particular customers, etc.

While the core of every OLAP Perf benchmark is real world query performance, the benchmark itself offers numerous execution options such as varying data set sizes, number of users, numbers of queries for any given user and cube update frequency. Version 3 of the benchmark is executed with a much larger number of query streams than previous versions and used a cube designed for near real-time updates. The results produced by version 3 of the benchmark are not directly comparable to results produced by previous versions of the benchmark.

The near real-time update capability is implemented along the following lines. A large Oracle cube, H, is built from a 4 billion row star schema, containing data up until the end of last business day. A second small cube, D, is then created which will contain all of today's new data coming in from outside the world. It will be updated every L minutes with the data coming in within the last L minutes. A third cube, R, joins cubes H and D for reporting purposes much like a view might join data from two tables. Calculations are installed into cube R. The use of a reporting cube which draws data from different storage cubes is a common practice.

Query users are never locked out of query operations while new data is added to the update cube. The point of the demonstration is to show that an Oracle OLAP system can be designed which results in data being no more than L minutes out of date, where L may be as low as just a few minutes. This is what is meant by near real-time analytics.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • Update performance of the D cube was optimized by running update processes in the FX class with a priority greater than 0. The maximum lag time between updates to the source fact table and data availability to query users (what was referred to as L in the benchmark description) was less than 3 minutes for the benchmark environment on the SPARC T5-8 server.

  • Building and querying cubes with the Oracle OLAP option requires a large temporary tablespace. Normally temporary tablespaces would reside on disk storage. However, because the SPARC T5-8 server used in this benchmark had 4 TB of main memory, it was possible to use main memory for the OLAP temporary tablespace. This was done by using files in /tmp for the temporary tablespace datafiles.

  • Since typical BI users are often likely to issue similar queries, either with the same, or different, constants in the where clauses, setting the init.ora parameter "cursor_sharing" to "force" provides for additional query throughput and a larger number of potential users.

  • Assuming the normal Oracle initialization parameters (e.g. SGA, PGA, processes etc.) are appropriately set, out of the box performance for the OLAP Perf workload should be close to what is reported here. Additional performance resulted from (a)using memory for the OLAP temporary tablespace (b)setting "cursor_sharing" to force.

  • For a given number of query users with zero think time, the main measured metrics are the average query response time and the query throughput. A derived metric is the maximum number of users the system can support, with the same response time, assuming some non-zero think time. The calculation of this maximum is from the well-known "response-time law"

      N = (rt + tt) * tp

    where rt is the average response time, tt is the think time and tp is the measured throughput.

    Setting tt to 60 seconds, rt to 0.66 seconds and tp to 815 queries/sec (2,934,000 queries/hour), the above formula shows that the SPARC T5-8 server will support 49,450 concurrent users with a think time of 60 seconds and an average response time of 0.66 seconds.

    For more information about the "response-time law" see chapter 3 from the book "Quantitative System Performance" cited below.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

Copyright 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. Results as of 03/26/2013.

SPARC T5-2 Achieves ZFS File System Encryption Benchmark World Record

Oracle continues to lead in enterprise security. Oracle's SPARC T5 processors combined with the Oracle Solaris ZFS file system demonstrate faster file system encryption than equivalent x86 systems using the Intel Xeon Processor E5-2600 Sequence chips which have AES-NI security instructions.

Encryption is the process where data is encoded for privacy and a key is needed by the data owner to access the encoded data.

  • The SPARC T5-2 server is 3.4x faster than a 2 processor Intel Xeon E5-2690 server running Oracle Solaris 11.1 that uses the AES-NI GCM security instructions for creating encrypted files.

  • The SPARC T5-2 server is 2.2x faster than a 2 processor Intel Xeon E5-2690 server running Oracle Solaris 11.1 that uses the AES-NI CCM security instructions for creating encrypted files.

  • The SPARC T5-2 server consumes a significantly less percentage of system resources as compared to a 2 processor Intel Xeon E5-2690 server.

Performance Landscape

Below are results running two different ciphers for ZFS encryption. Results are presented for runs without any cipher, labeled clear, and a variety of different key lengths. The results represent the maximum delivered values measured for 3 concurrent sequential write operations using 1M blocks. Performance is measured in MB/sec (bigger is better). System utilization is reported as %CPU as measured by iostat (smaller is better).

The results for the x86 server were obtained using Oracle Solaris 11.1 with performance bug fixes.

Encryption Using AES-GCM Ciphers

System GCM Encryption: 3 Concurrent Sequential Writes
Clear AES-256-GCM AES-192-GCM AES-128-GCM
MB/sec %CPU MB/sec %CPU MB/sec %CPU MB/sec %CPU
SPARC T5-2 server 3,918 7 3,653 14 3,676 15 3,628 14
SPARC T4-2 server 2,912 11 2,662 31 2,663 30 2,779 31
2-Socket Intel Xeon E5-2690 3,969 42 1,062 58 1,067 58 1,076 57
SPARC T5-2 vs x86 server 1.0x 3.4x 3.4x 3.4x

Encryption Using AES-CCM Ciphers

System CCM Encryption: 3 Concurrent Sequential Writes
Clear AES-256-CCM AES-192-CCM AES-128-CCM
MB/sec %CPU MB/sec %CPU MB/sec %CPU MB/sec %CPU
SPARC T5-2 server 3,862 7 3,665 15 3,622 14 3,707 12
SPARC T4-2 server 2,945 11 2,471 26 2,801 26 2,442 25
2-Socket Intel Xeon E5-2690 3,868 42 1,566 64 1,632 63 1,689 66
SPARC T5-2 vs x86 server 1.0x 2.3x 2.2x 2.2x

Configuration Summary

Storage Configuration:

Sun Storage 6780 array
4 CSM2 trays, each with 16 83GB 15K RPM drives
8x 8 GB/sec Fiber Channel ports per host
R0 Write cache enabled, controller mirroring off for peak write bandwidth
8 Drive R0 512K stripe pools mirrored via ZFS to storage

Sun Storage 6580 array
9 CSM2 trays, each with 16 136GB 15K RPM drives
8x 4 GB/sec Fiber Channel ports per host
R0 Write cache enabled, controller mirroring off for peak write bandwidth
4 Drive R0 512K stripe pools mirrored via ZFS to storage

Server Configuration:

SPARC T5-2 server
2 x SPARC T5 3.6 GHz processors
512 GB memory
Oracle Solaris 11.1

SPARC T4-2 server
2 x SPARC T4 2.85 GHz processors
256 GB memory
Oracle Solaris 11.1

Sun Server X3-2L server
2 x Intel Xeon E5-2690, 2.90 GHz processors
128 GB memory
Oracle Solaris 11.1

Switch Configuration:

Brocade 5300 FC switch

Benchmark Description

This benchmark evaluates secure file system performance by measuring the rate at which encrypted data can be written. The Vdbench tool was used to generate the IO load. The test performed 3 concurrent sequential write operations using 1M blocks to 3 separate files.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • ZFS encryption is integrated with the ZFS command set. Like other ZFS operations, encryption operations such as key changes and re-key are performed online.

  • Data is encrypted using AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) with key lengths of 256, 192, and 128 in the CCM and GCM operation modes.

  • The flexibility of encrypting specific file systems is a key feature.

  • ZFS encryption is inheritable to descendent file systems. Key management can be delegated through ZFS delegated administration.

  • ZFS encryption uses the Oracle Solaris Cryptographic Framework which gives it access to SPARC T5 and Intel Xeon E5-2690 processor hardware acceleration or to optimized software implementations of the encryption algorithms automatically.

  • On modern computers with multiple threads per core, simple statistics like %utilization measured in tools like iostat and vmstat are not "hard" indications of the resources that might be available for other processing. For example, 90% idle may not mean that 10 times the work can be done. So drawing numerical conclusions must be done carefully.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

Copyright 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. Results as of March 26, 2013.

Thursday Nov 08, 2012

SPARC T4-4 Delivers World Record Performance on Oracle OLAP Perf Version 2 Benchmark

Oracle's SPARC T4-4 server delivered world record performance with subsecond response time on the Oracle OLAP Perf Version 2 benchmark using Oracle Database 11g Release 2 running on Oracle Solaris 11.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server achieved throughput of 430,000 cube-queries/hour with an average response time of 0.85 seconds and the median response time of 0.43 seconds. This was achieved by using only 60% of the available CPU resources leaving plenty of headroom for future growth.

Performance Landscape

Oracle OLAP Perf Version 2 Benchmark
4 Billion Fact Table Rows
System Queries/
hour
Users* Response Time (sec)
Average Median
SPARC T4-4 430,000 7,300 0.85 0.43

* Users - the supported number of users with a given think time of 60 seconds

Configuration Summary and Results

Hardware Configuration:

SPARC T4-4 server with
4 x SPARC T4 processors, 3.0 GHz
1 TB memory
Data Storage
1 x Sun Fire X4275 (using COMSTAR)
2 x Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array (each with 80 FMODs)
Redo Storage
1 x Sun Fire X4275 (using COMSTAR with 8 HDD)

Software Configuration:

Oracle Solaris 11 11/11
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.3) with Oracle OLAP option

Benchmark Description

The Oracle OLAP Perf Version 2 benchmark is a workload designed to demonstrate and stress the Oracle OLAP product's core features of fast query, fast update, and rich calculations on a multi-dimensional model to support enhanced Data Warehousing.

The bulk of the benchmark entails running a number of concurrent users, each issuing typical multidimensional queries against an Oracle OLAP cube. The cube has four dimensions: time, product, customer, and channel. Each query user issues approximately 150 different queries. One query chain may ask for total sales in a particular region (e.g South America) for a particular time period (e.g. Q4 of 2010) followed by additional queries which drill down into sales for individual countries (e.g. Chile, Peru, etc.) with further queries drilling down into individual stores, etc. Another query chain may ask for yearly comparisons of total sales for some product category (e.g. major household appliances) and then issue further queries drilling down into particular products (e.g. refrigerators, stoves. etc.), particular regions, particular customers, etc.

Results from version 2 of the benchmark are not comparable with version 1. The primary difference is the type of queries along with the query mix.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • Since typical BI users are often likely to issue similar queries, with different constants in the where clauses, setting the init.ora prameter "cursor_sharing" to "force" will provide for additional query throughput and a larger number of potential users. Except for this setting, together with making full use of available memory, out of the box performance for the OLAP Perf workload should provide results similar to what is reported here.

  • For a given number of query users with zero think time, the main measured metrics are the average query response time, the median query response time, and the query throughput. A derived metric is the maximum number of users the system can support achieving the measured response time assuming some non-zero think time. The calculation of the maximum number of users follows from the well-known response-time law

      N = (rt + tt) * tp

    where rt is the average response time, tt is the think time and tp is the measured throughput.

    Setting tt to 60 seconds, rt to 0.85 seconds and tp to 119.44 queries/sec (430,000 queries/hour), the above formula shows that the T4-4 server will support 7,300 concurrent users with a think time of 60 seconds and an average response time of 0.85 seconds.

    For more information see chapter 3 from the book "Quantitative System Performance" cited below.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

Copyright 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. Results as of 11/2/2012.

Thursday Apr 19, 2012

Sun ZFS Storage 7420 Appliance Delivers 2-Node World Record SPECsfs2008 NFS Benchmark

Oracle's Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance delivered world record two-node performance on the SPECsfs2008 NFS benchmark, beating results published on NetApp's dual-controller and 4-node high-end FAS6240 storage systems.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance delivered a world record two-node result of 267,928 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec with an Overall Response Time (ORT) of 1.31 msec on the SPECsfs2008 NFS benchmark.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance delivered 1.4x higher throughput than the dual-controller NetApp FAS6240 and 2.6x higher throughput than the dual-controller NetApp FAS3270 on the SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 benchmark at less than half the list price of either result.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance required 10 percent less rack space than the dual-controller NetApp FAS6240.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance had 3 percent higher throughput than the 4-node NetApp FAS6240 on the SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 benchmark.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance required 25 percent less rack space than the 4-node NetApp FAS6240.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance has 14 percent better Overall Response Time than the 4-node NetApp FAS6240 on the SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 benchmark.

Performance Landscape

SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Performance Chart (in decreasing SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec order)

Sponsor System Throughput
(Ops/sec)
Overall Response
Time (msec)
Nodes Memory (GB)
Including Flash
Disks Rack Units –
Controllers
+Disks
Oracle 7420 267,928 1.31 2 6,728 280 54
NetApp FAS6240 260,388 1.53 4 2,256 288 72
NetApp FAS6240 190,675 1.17 2 1,128 288 60
EMC VG8 135,521 1.92 280 312
Oracle 7320 134,140 1.51 2 4,968 136 26
EMC NS-G8 110,621 2.32 264 100
NetApp FAS3270 101,183 1.66 2 40 360 66

Throughput SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec — the Performance Metric
Overall Response Time — the corresponding Response Time Metric
Nodes — Nodes and Controllers are being used interchangeably

Complete SPECsfs2008 benchmark results may be found at http://www.spec.org/sfs2008/results/sfs2008.html.

Configuration Summary

Storage Configuration:

Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance in clustered configuration
2 x Sun ZFS Storage 7420 controllers, each with
4 x 2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E7-4870 processors
1 TB memory
4 x 512 GB SSD flash-enabled read-cache
2 x 10GbE NICs
12 x Sun Disk shelves
10 x shelves with 24 x 300 GB 15K RPM SAS-2 drives
2 x shelves with 20 x 300 GB 15K RPM SAS-2 drives and 4 x 73 GB SAS-2 flash-enabled write-cache

Server Configuration:

4 x Sun Fire X4270 M2 servers, each with
2 x 3.3 GHz Intel Xeon E5680 processors
144 GB memory
1 x 10 GbE NIC
Oracle Solaris 10 9/10

Switches:

1 x 24-port 10Gb Ethernet Switch

Benchmark Description

SPECsfs2008 is the latest version of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC) benchmark suite measuring file server throughput and response time, providing a standardized method for comparing performance across different vendor platforms. SPECsfs2008 results summarize the server's capabilities with respect to the number of operations that can be handled per second, as well as the overall latency of the operations. The suite is a follow-on to the SFS97_R1 benchmark, adding a CIFS workload, an updated NFSv3 workload, support for additional client platforms, and a new test harness and reporting/submission framework.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

SPEC and SPECsfs are registered trademarks of Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). Results as of April 18, 2012, for more information see www.spec.org. Sun ZFS Storage 7420 Appliance 267,928 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec, 1.31 msec ORT, NetApp Data ONTAP 8.1 Cluster-Mode (4-node FAS6240) 260,388 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.53 msec ORT, NetApp FAS6240 190,675 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.17 msec ORT. NetApp FAS3270 101,183 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.66 msec ORT.

Nodes refer to the item in the SPECsfs2008 disclosed Configuration Bill of Materials that have the Processing Elements that perform the NFS Processing Function. These are the first item listed in each of disclosed Configuration Bill of Materials except for EMC where it is both the first and third items listed, and HP, where it is the second item listed as Blade Servers. The number of nodes is from the QTY disclosed in the Configuration Bill of Materials as described above. Configuration Bill of Materials list price for Oracle result of US$ 423,644. Configuration Bill of Materials list price for NetApp FAS3270 result of US$ 1,215,290. Configuration Bill of Materials list price for NetApp FAS6240 result of US$ 1,028,118. Oracle pricing from https://shop.oracle.com/pls/ostore/f?p=dstore:home:0, traverse to "Storage and Tape" and then to "NAS Storage". NetApp's pricing from http://www.netapp.com/us/media/na-list-usd-netapp-custom-state-new-discounts.html.

Sunday Apr 15, 2012

Sun ZFS Storage 7420 Appliance Delivers Top High-End Price/Performance Result for SPC-2 Benchmark

Oracle's Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance delivered leading high-end price/performance on the SPC Benchmark 2 (SPC-2).

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance delivered a result of 10,704 SPC-2 MB/s at $35.24 $/SPC-2 MB/s on the SPC-2 benchmark.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance beats the IBM DS8800 result by over 10% on SPC-2 MB/s and has 7.7x better $/SPC-2 MB/s.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance achieved the best price/performance for the top 18 posted unique performance results on the SPC-2 benchmark.

Performance Landscape

SPC-2 Performance Chart (in decreasing performance order)

System SPC-2
MB/s
$/SPC-2
MB/s
ASU
Capacity
(GB)
TSC Price Data
Protection
Level
Date Results
Identifier
HP StorageWorks P9500 13,148 $88.34 129,112 $1,161,504 RAID-5 03/07/12 B00056
Sun ZFS Storage 7420 10,704 $35.24 31,884 $377,225 Mirroring 04/12/12 B00058
IBM DS8800 9,706 $270.38 71,537 $2,624,257 RAID-5 12/01/10 B00051
HP XP24000 8,725 $187.45 18,401 $1,635,434 Mirroring 09/08/08 B00035
Hitachi Storage Platform V 8,725 $187.49 18,401 $1,635,770 Mirroring 09/08/08 B00036
TMS RamSan-630 8,323 $49.37 8,117 $410,927 RAID-5 05/10/11 B00054
IBM XIV 7,468 $152.34 154,619 $1,137,641 RAID-1 10/19/11 BE00001
IBM DS8700 7,247 $277.22 32,642 $2,009,007 RAID-5 11/30/09 B00049
IBM SAN Vol Ctlr 4.2 7,084 $463.66 101,155 $3,284,767 RAID-5 07/12/07 B00024
Fujitsu ETERNUS DX440 S2 5,768 $66.50 42,133 $383,576 Mirroring 04/12/12 B00057
IBM DS5300 5,634 $74.13 16,383 $417,648 RAID-5 10/21/09 B00045
Sun Storage 6780 5,634 $47.03 16,383 $264,999 RAID-5 10/28/09 B00047
IBM DS5300 5,544 $75.33 14,043 $417,648 RAID-6 10/21/09 B00046
Sun Storage 6780 5,544 $47.80 14,043 $264,999 RAID-6 10/28/09 B00048
IBM DS5300 4,818 $93.80 16,383 $451,986 RAID-5 09/25/08 B00037
Sun Storage 6780 4,818 $53.61 16,383 $258,329 RAID-5 02/02/09 B00039
IBM DS5300 4,676 $96.67 14,043 $451,986 RAID-6 09/25/08 B00038
Sun Storage 6780 4,676 $55.25 14,043 $258,329 RAID-6 02/03/09 B00040
IBM SAN Vol Ctlr 4.1 4,544 $400.78 51,265 $1,821,301 RAID-5 09/12/06 B00011
IBM SAN Vol Ctlr 3.1 3,518 $563.93 20,616 $1,983,785 Mirroring 12/14/05 B00001
Fujitsu ETERNUS8000 1100 3,481 $238.93 4,570 $831,649 Mirroring 03/08/07 B00019
IBM DS8300 3,218 $539.38 15,393 $1,735,473 Mirroring 12/14/05 B00006
IBM Storwize V7000 3,133 $71.32 29,914 $223,422 RAID-5 12/13/10 B00052

SPC-2 MB/s = the Performance Metric
$/SPC-2 MB/s = the Price/Performance Metric
ASU Capacity = the Capacity Metric
Data Protection = Data Protection Metric
TSC Price = Total Cost of Ownership Metric
Results Identifier = A unique identification of the result Metric

Complete SPC-2 benchmark results may be found at http://www.storageperformance.org.

Configuration Summary

Storage Configuration:

Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance in clustered configuration
2 x Sun ZFS Storage 7420 controllers, each with
4 x 2.0 GHz Intel Xeon X7550 processors
512 GB memory, 64 x 8 GB 1066 MHz DDR3 DIMMs
16 x Sun Disk shelves, each with
24 x 300 GB 15K RPM SAS-2 drives

Server Configuration:

1 x Sun Fire X4470 server, with
4 x 2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E7-4870 processors
512 GB memory
8 x 8 Gb FC connections to the Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance
Oracle Solaris 11 11/11

2 x Sun Fire X4470 servers, each with
4 x 2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E7-4870 processors
256 GB memory
8 x 8 Gb FC connections to the Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance
Oracle Solaris 11 11/11

Benchmark Description

SPC Benchmark-2 (SPC-2): Consists of three distinct workloads designed to demonstrate the performance of a storage subsystem during the execution of business critical applications that require the large-scale, sequential movement of data. Those applications are characterized predominately by large I/Os organized into one or more concurrent sequential patterns. A description of each of the three SPC-2 workloads is listed below as well as examples of applications characterized by each workload.

  • Large File Processing: Applications in a wide range of fields, which require simple sequential process of one or more large files such as scientific computing and large-scale financial processing.
  • Large Database Queries: Applications that involve scans or joins of large relational tables, such as those performed for data mining or business intelligence.
  • Video on Demand: Applications that provide individualized video entertainment to a community of subscribers by drawing from a digital film library.

SPC-2 is built to:

  • Provide a level playing field for test sponsors.
  • Produce results that are powerful and yet simple to use.
  • Provide value for engineers as well as IT consumers and solution integrators.
  • Is easy to run, easy to audit/verify, and easy to use to report official results.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

SPC-2, SPC-2 MB/s, $/SPC-2 MB/s are registered trademarks of Storage Performance Council (SPC). Results as of April 12, 2012, for more information see www.storageperformance.org. Sun ZFS Storage 7420 Appliance http://www.storageperformance.org/results/benchmark_results_spc2#b00058; IBM DS8800 http://www.storageperformance.org/results/benchmark_results_spc2#b00051.

Monday Feb 27, 2012

Sun ZFS Storage 7320 Appliance 33% Faster Than NetApp FAS3270 on SPECsfs2008

Oracle's Sun ZFS Storage 7320 appliance delivered outstanding performance on the SPECsfs2008 NFS benchmark, beating results published on NetApp's fastest midrange platform, the NetApp FAS3270, and the EMC Gateway NS-G8 Server Failover Cluster.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7320 appliance delivered 134,140 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec with an Overall Response Time (ORT) of 1.51 msec on the SPECsfs2008 NFS benchmark.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7320 appliance has 33% higher throughput than the NetApp FAS3270 on the SPECsfs2008 NFS benchmark.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7320 appliance required less than half the rack space of the NetApp FAS3270.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7320 appliance has 9% better Overall Response Time than the NetApp FAS3270 on the SPECsfs2008 NFS benchmark.

Performance Landscape

SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Performance Chart (in decreasing SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec order)

Sponsor System Throughput
(Ops/sec)
Overall Response
Time (msec)
Memory
(GB)
Disks Exported
Capacity (TB)
Rack Units
Controllers+Disks
EMC VG8 135,521 1.92 280 312 19.2
Oracle 7320 134,140 1.51 288 136 37.0 26
EMC NS-G8 110,621 2.32 264 100 17.6
NetApp FAS3270 101,183 1.66 40 360 110.1 66

Throughput SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec = the Performance Metric
Overall Response Time = the corresponding Response Time Metric

Complete SPECsfs2008 benchmark results may be found at http://www.spec.org/sfs2008/results/sfs2008.html.

Configuration Summary

Storage Configuration:

Sun ZFS Storage 7320 appliance in clustered configuration
2 x Sun ZFS Storage 7320 controllers, each with
2 x 2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E5620 processors
144 GB memory
4 x 512 GB SSD flash-enabled read-cache
6 x Sun Disk shelves
4 x shelves with 24 x 300 GB 15K RPM SAS-2 drives
2 x shelves with 20 x 300 GB 15K RPM SAS-2 drives and 4 x 73 GB SAS-2 flash-enabled write-cache

Server Configuration:

3 x Sun Fire X4270 M2 servers, each with
2 x 2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E5620 processors
12 GB memory
1 x 10 GbE connection to the Sun ZFS Storage 7320 appliance
Oracle Solaris 10 8/11

Benchmark Description

SPECsfs2008 is the latest version of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC) benchmark suite measuring file server throughput and response time, providing a standardized method for comparing performance across different vendor platforms. SPECsfs2008 results summarize the server's capabilities with respect to the number of operations that can be handled per second, as well as the overall latency of the operations. The suite is a follow-on to the SFS97_R1 benchmark, adding a CIFS workload, an updated NFSv3 workload, support for additional client platforms, and a new test harness and reporting/submission framework.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

SPEC and SPECsfs are registered trademarks of Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). Results as of February 22, 2012, for more information see www.spec.org. Sun ZFS Storage 7320 Appliance 134,140 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/sec, 1.51 msec ORT, NetApp FAS3270 101,183 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 1.66 msec ORT, EMC Celerra Gateway NS-G8 Server Failover Cluster, 3 Datamovers (1 stdby) / Symmetrix V-Max 110,621 SPECsfs2008_nfs.v3 Ops/Sec, 2.32 msec ORT.

Monday Oct 03, 2011

Sun ZFS Storage 7420 Appliance Doubles NetApp FAS3270A on SPC-1 Benchmark

Oracle's Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance delivered outstanding performance and price/performance on the SPC Benchmark 1, beating results published on the NetApp FAS3270A.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance delivered 137,066.20 SPC-1 IOPS at $2.99 $/SPC-1 IOPS on the SPC-1 benchmark.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance outperformed the NetApp FAS3270A by 2x on the SPC-1 benchmark.

  • The Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance outperformed the NetApp FAS3270A by 2.5x on price/performance on the SPC-1 benchmark.

Performance Landscape

SPC-1 Performance Chart (in decreasing performance order)

System SPC-1
IOPS
$/SPC-1
IOPS
ASU
Capacity
(GB)
TSC Price Data
Protection
Level
Date Results
Identifier
Huawei Symantec S6800T 150,061.17 $3.08 43,937.515 $461,471.75 Mirroring 08/31/11 A00107
Sun ZFS Storage 7420 137,066.20 $2.99 23,703.035 $409,933 Mirroring 10/03/11 A00108
Huawei Symantec S5600T 102,471.66 $2.73 35,945.185 $279,914.53 Mirroring 08/25/11 A00106
Pillar Axiom 600 70,102.27 $7.32 32,000.000 $513,112 Mirroring 04/19/11 A00104
NetApp FAS3270A 68,034.63 $7.48 21,659.386 $509,200.79 RAID DP 11/09/10 AE00004
Sun Storage 6780 62,261.80 $6.89 13,742.218 $429,294 Mirroring 06/01/10 A00094
NetApp FAS3170 60,515.34 $10.01 19,628,500 $605,492 RAID-DP 06/10/08 A00066
IBM V7000 56,510.85 $7.24 14,422.309 $409,410.86 Mirroring 10/22/10 A00097
IBM V7000 53,014.29 $7.52 24,433.592 $389,425.11 Mirroring 03/14/11 A00103

SPC-1 IOPS = the Performance Metric
$/SPC-1 IOPS = the Price/Performance Metric
ASU Capacity = the Capacity Metric
Data Protection = Data Protection Metric
TSC Price = Total Cost of Ownership Metric
Results Identifier = A unique identification of the result Metric

Complete SPC-1 benchmark results may be found at http://www.storageperformance.org.

Configuration Summary

Storage Configuration:

Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance in clustered configuration
2 x Sun ZFS Storage 7420 controllers, each with
4 x 2.0 GHz Intel Xeon X7550 processors
512 GB memory, 64 x 8 GB 1066 MHz DDR3 DIMMs
4 x 512 GB SSD flash-enabled read-cache
12 x Sun Disk shelves
10 x shelves with 24 x 300 GB 15K RPM SAS-2 drives
2 x shelves with 20 x 300 GB 15K RPM SAS-2 drives and 4 x 73 GB SAS-2 flash-enabled write-cache

Server Configuration:

1 x SPARC T3-2 server
2 x 1.65 GHz SPARC T3 processors
128 GB memory
6 x 8 Gb FC connections to the Sun ZFS Storage 7420 appliance
Oracle Solaris 10 9/10

Benchmark Description

SPC Benchmark-1 (SPC-1): is the first industry standard storage benchmark and is the most comprehensive performance analysis environment ever constructed for storage subsystems. The I/O workload in SPC-1 is characterized by predominately random I/O operations as typified by multi-user OLTP, database, and email servers environments. SPC-1 uses a highly efficient multi-threaded workload generator to thoroughly analyze direct attach or network storage subsystems. The SPC-1 benchmark enables companies to rapidly produce valid performance and price/performance results using a variety of host platforms and storage network topologies.

SPC1 is built to:

  • Provide a level playing field for test sponsors.
  • Produce results that are powerful and yet simple to use.
  • Provide value for engineers as well as IT consumers and solution integrators.
  • Is easy to run, easy to audit/verify, and easy to use to report official results.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

SPC-1, SPC-1 IOPS, $/SPC-1 IOPS are registered trademarks of Storage Performance Council (SPC). Results as of October 2, 2011, for more information see www.storageperformance.org. Sun ZFS Storage 7420 Appliance http://www.storageperformance.org/results/benchmark_results_spc1#a00108; NetApp FAS3270A http://www.storageperformance.org/results/benchmark_results_spc1#ae00004.

SPARC T4-4 Produces World Record Oracle OLAP Capacity

Oracle's SPARC T4-4 server delivered world record capacity on the Oracle OLAP Perf workload.

  • The SPARC T4-4 server was able to operate on a cube with a 3 billion row fact table of sales data containing 4 dimensions which represents as many as 70 quintillion aggregate rows (70 followed by 18 zeros).

  • The SPARC T4-4 server supported 3,500 cube-queries/minute against the Oracle OLAP cube with an average response time of 1.5 seconds and the median response time of 0.15 seconds.

Performance Landscape

Oracle OLAP Perf Benchmark
System Fact Table
Num of Rows
Cube-Queries/
minute
Median Response
seconds
Average Response
seconds
SPARC T4-4 3 Billion 3,500 0.15 1.5

Configuration Summary and Results

Hardware Configuration:

SPARC T4-4 server with
4 x SPARC T4 processors, 3.0 GHz
1 TB main memory
2 x Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array

Software Configuration:

Oracle Solaris 10 8/11
Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition with Oracle OLAP option

Benchmark Description

OLAP Perf is a workload designed to demonstrate and stress the Oracle OLAP product's core functionalities of fast query, fast update, and rich calculations on a dimensional model to support Enhanced Data Warehousing. The workload uses a set of realistic business intelligence (BI) queries that run against an OLAP cube.

Key Points and Best Practices

  • The SPARC T4-4 server is estimated to support 2,400 interactive users with this fast response time assuming only 5 seconds between query requests.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

Copyright 2011, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. Results as of 10/3/2011.

Friday Sep 30, 2011

SPARC T4-2 Server Beats Intel (Westmere AES-NI) on ZFS Encryption Tests

Oracle continues to lead in enterprise security. Oracle's SPARC T4 processors combined with Oracle's Solaris ZFS file system demonstrate faster file system encryption than equivalent systems based on the Intel Xeon Processor 5600 Sequence chips which use AES-NI security instructions.

Encryption is the process where data is encoded for privacy and a key is needed by the data owner to access the encoded data. The benefits of using ZFS encryption are:

  • The SPARC T4 processor is 3.5x to 5.2x faster than the Intel Xeon Processor X5670 that has the AES-NI security instructions in creating encrypted files.

  • ZFS encryption is integrated with the ZFS command set. Like other ZFS operations, encryption operations such as key changes and re-key are performed online.

  • Data is encrypted using AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) with key lengths of 256, 192, and 128 in the CCM and GCM operation modes.

  • The flexibility of encrypting specific file systems is a key feature.

  • ZFS encryption is inheritable to descendent file systems. Key management can be delegated through ZFS delegated administration.

  • ZFS encryption uses the Oracle Solaris Cryptographic Framework which gives it access to SPARC T4 processor and Intel Xeon X5670 processor (Intel AES-NI) hardware acceleration or to optimized software implementations of the encryption algorithms automatically.

Performance Landscape

Below are results running two different ciphers for ZFS encryption. Results are presented for runs without any cipher, labeled clear, and a variety of different key lengths.

Encryption Using AES-CCM Ciphers

MB/sec – 5 File Create* Encryption
Clear AES-256-CCM AES-192-CCM AES-128-CCM
SPARC T4-2 server 3,803 3,167 3,335 3,225
SPARC T3-2 server 2,286 1,554 1,561 1,594
2-Socket 2.93 GHz Xeon X5670 3,325 750 764 773

Speedup T4-2 vs X5670 1.1x 4.2x 4.4x 4.2x
Speedup T4-2 vs T3-2 1.7x 2.0x 2.1x 2.0x

Encryption Using AES-GCM Ciphers

MB/sec – 5 File Create* Encryption
Clear AES-256-GCM AES-192-GCM AES-128-GCM
SPARC T4-2 server 3,618 3,929 3,164 2,613
SPARC T3-2 server 2,278 1,451 1,455 1,449
2-Socket 2.93 GHz Xeon X5670 3,299 749 748 753

Speedup T4-2 vs X5670 1.1x 5.2x 4.2x 3.5x
Speedup T4-2 vs T3-2 1.6x 2.7x 2.2x 1.8x

(*) Maximum Delivered values measured over 5 concurrent mkfile operations.

Configuration Summary

Storage Configuration:

Sun Storage 6780 array
16 x 15K RPM drives
Raid 0 pool
Write back cache enable
Controller cache mirroring disabled for maximum bandwidth for test
Eight 8 Gb/sec ports per host

Server Configuration:

SPARC T4-2 server
2 x SPARC T4 2.85 GHz processors
256 GB memory
Oracle Solaris 11

SPARC T3-2 server
2 x SPARC T3 1.6 GHz processors
Oracle Solaris 11 Express 2010.11

Sun Fire X4270 M2 server
2 x Intel Xeon X5670, 2.93 GHz processors
Oracle Solaris 11

Benchmark Description

The benchmark ran the UNIX command mkfile (1M). Mkfile is a simple single threaded program to create a file of a specified size. The script ran 5 mkfile operations in the background and observed the peak bandwidth observed during the test.

See Also

Disclosure Statement

Copyright 2011, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. Results as of December 16, 2011.

About

BestPerf is the source of Oracle performance expertise. In this blog, Oracle's Strategic Applications Engineering group explores Oracle's performance results and shares best practices learned from working on Enterprise-wide Applications.

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