Friday Mar 15, 2013

Exalogic Virtual - Creating a vServer using LVM2 for the root file-system

For a customer Proof of Concept - demonstrating the benefits of Oracle Fusion Middleware on Exalogic Virtual - we decided to build a custom base template. All vServers created by using this custom base template enable some customer specific configuration settings, activation of additional services and yields flexibility for the file-system layout.

We decided to use Logical Volume Management LVM2 to achieve the goal of file-system flexibility. This can easily be implemented, as the Base vServer Template, delivered by Oracle, already has all the necessary rpm's installed. The Default Gemini and Navstar vServer Templates come with a fixed partition and file-system layout. To keep a simple layout we went for one logical volume for the root file-system and another volume for swap. By using an ext3 file-system on top of the logical volume for root we are now able to re-size it as needed during normal operation. So whenever logs are filling up /var, or pre-req checks fail due to a lack of space in /tmp we can easily correct this.
In this first blog I will describe how to build a vServer using LVM2. As I said before, for the PoC we planned to use this vServer as a new custom base template. In a second blog post I will show the steps needed to create a vServer template out of this vServer.
This is very similar to what my colleague Andrew Hopkinson has already blogged about here, but needs a few extra steps because of the LVM2 usage.

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About

The primary contributors to this blog are comprised of the Exalogic and Cloud Application Foundation contingent of Oracle's Fusion Middleware Architecture Team, fondly known as the A-Team. As part of the Oracle development organization, The A-Team supports some of Oracle's largest and most strategic customers worldwide. Our mission is to provide deep technical expertise to support various Oracle field organizations and customers deploying Oracle Fusion Middleware related products. And to collect real world feedback to continuously improve the products we support. In this blog, our experts and guest experts will focus on Exalogic, WebLogic, Coherence, Tuxedo/mainframe migration, Enterprise Manager and JDK/JRockIT performance tuning. It is our way to share some of our experiences with Oracle community. We hope our followers took away something of value from our experiences. Thank you for visiting and please come back soon.

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